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Recordings 1-10 of 56 Next Last
Interviewee: William Geary (1899-2004) (Part 2) William Geary (1899-2004) (Part 2)
Interview location: Bayside, New York, USA
Audio series: Witnesses to Independence
Product ID: CD1916-08
Subject: Emigration to New York in 1928
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date: 2004
Length: 40:22
Track 1: William Geary recalls his journey to America on the SS Baltic, arriving in New York on 5 December 1928, and boarding in the Bronx with Mary Ellen Keane who had previously worked for his family. His first job was with the Edison Company, and in 1932 he joined the American Post Office as a collector of bills. Track 2: He recalls a number of people who lived in the Bronx at that time. Track 3: William married Margaret Rooskey, originally from Roscommon. He joined the American Air Force, was assigned to Administration in Nashville and later in Memphis, Tennessee. Track 4: He describes his memories of Cahirciveen in 1919 during the Troubles. He recalls the local weavers, the fishing and the wakes and he also recalls the challenge of learning Morse code in the Wireless School. Track 5: The introduction of formal uniform for the Garda Siochána in the early days is remembered. Track 6: William perused old photographs including one of himself and his family outside their family home, Cloonee Cottage, Ballyagran, taken in 1905. Track 7: He provides a description of his experiences at night school in America, where he studied for four years. Track 8: William Geary discusses the 75 long years he spent attempting to clear his name of the wrongful accusation that led to his dismissal from the Gardaí. He finally received a full pardon in 2002.
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Number of files: 1
File size(s): 36.89 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: William Geary (1899-2004), part 4 William Geary (1899-2004), part 4
Interview location: Bayside, New York, USA
Audio series: Witnesses to Independence
Product ID: CD1916-10
Subject: An early member of the Garda Siochána and his battle for justice
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date: 2004
Length:
In June 2004, I was invited by the Irish American Historical Society in New York to come to the city to address them on my work involving the recording and archiving of local history and folklore. The Society also suggested that I record the memories of William Geary from Ballyagran, Co. Limerick who lived in New York. I was very pleased to be afforded the opportunity to meet this fascinating man, who had lived in three centuries - his young manhood lived in an Ireland in the grip of appalling turmoil. I made my way to Bayside, New York and met William Geary, and his story held such fascination for me, I returned to record him a second time during that week. At that time he was 105 years old, and was to die peacefully less than six months later. William began his life in Ballyagran. He was born in 1899, into a strong farming family. Following schooling locally he travelled to Caherciveen, Co. Kerry in 1918 to train as a wireless operator at the Atlantic Wireless School. Principal Maurice Fitzgerald awarded him a First Class Honour on his graduation. For a year he travelled the world as a ship's wireless operator, and then decided to return home, where he became involved in drilling the local Volunteers in Co. Limerick. In May 1922 he joined the new Garda Siochána and served initially in Newbridge, Co Kildare. He was on duty in Dublin Castle along with many colleagues from Kildare on the day the British flag was lowered and "... the British marched out and we marched in." Later he was on sentry duty by night at the Castle and remembers rifle fire "... all over the city." He was promoted to Acting Inspector and transferred to Clones, Co Monaghan, and later Templemore, Co Tipperary where two Gardaí were dismissed for their failure to arrest an armed IRA man as the standard of discipline within the Garda force was extremely rigid. On 10th June 1926 he was transferred to Kilrush, Co Clare as Superintendent. The IRA was active in the area, being involved in general harassment such as the burning of farmers' hay, though William contended that compensation was sometimes sought from the Government for hay which was otherwise set alight! On 14th June 1928 he was summoned to the Old Ground Hotel in Ennis, in uniform, to meet Commissioner Eoin O'Duffy and Chief Superintendent of Detectives David Neligan. He was accused of accepting a £100 bribe from the IRA and was dismissed from the GardaSiochána on 25th June 1928. He was devastated at this turn of events and returned home to Limerick. He made the decision to emigrate to New York, as he now had no prospects in Ireland, so shortly thereafter he booked his passage and sailed to New York, where he boarded for some time with his former nanny from Ballyagran, Miss Mary Ellen Keane. He took various employments over the years and during the Second World War he joined the US Air Force. He married and reared a family, but always endeavoured to clear his name by writing to consecutive Ministers for Justice in Ireland. For all of seventy years he and his friends at home in Ireland never faltered in their efforts to get justice for him, and to have him fully exonerated. Finally, in 2002 John O'Donoghue, Minister for Justice, restored his honour and travelled to New York to meet William Geary personally. After all the long and bitter years of battling for exoneration Mr Geary was elated and relieved and he lived out his final days in peace until his death in late 2004
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File size(s): 34.08 MB
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Interviewee: Des and Pam Cooke Des and Pam Cooke
Interview location: Tralee, Co. Kerry
Audio series: Witnesses to Independence
Product ID: CD1916-21
Subject: A Protestant family during the Troubles
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date: 2004
Length: 42:00
Track 1: Des Cooke and his wife Pam recall the background to the Cooke family in Kerry. In 1909, Des’s father, Charles, was employed as chauffeur at the Crosbie estate in Ballyheigue, and he later set up a hackney business at 33 Upper Castle Street, Tralee. Des remembers his brother-in-law, Harry Flower, who set up what is now Kerry Motor Works in Tralee. Pam tells the story of how her father-in-law, Charles, was caught up in the Rising while on honeymoon in Dublin. Both Des and Pam recall the death threats sent to Pam’s brother Harry, and to Des’s father Charles during the Civil war, ordering them to leave Ireland for their own safety. Pam still retains these original letters. Track 2: Des reminisces about other motor works in the town of Tralee and the variety of businesses there in earlier days. Pam recalls her involvement with leisure pursuits in the town. And Des recalls his brothers Jack and Roger, who were killed on active service with the RAF during WWII. A third brother, Peter, also in the RAF, survived.
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Number of files: 1
File size(s): 38.00 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Dan Donovan (part 1) Dan Donovan (part 1)
Interview location:
Audio series: Cork city, first series
Product ID: CDCKCY01-01
Subject:
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date:
Length:
Dan Donovan was born in Ballincollig in 1926. His father was an ex-Royal Irish Constabulary man from Glandore in west Cork and his mother was a teacher who came from a family with a very strong teaching tradition. Dan Donovan went to school in Presentation College in Cork, and later taught there. In first recording, Dan speaks about his involvement with the Irish Dramatic Society, about joining the Local Defence Force during the Emergency period and organising the production of plays in the school each year with the students. He fondly recalls Dermot Breen and the growth of the drama festival from the 1940s onwards which evolved into the Everyman Theatre. He also speaks about how his perspective changed after 1959 following the setting up of a company which worked with John B. Keane on the production of ‘Sive’.
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Number of files: 1
File size(s): 68.45 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Mary Rohan (part 3) Mary Rohan (part 3)
Interview location:
Audio series: Cork city, first series
Product ID: CDCKCY01-13
Subject:
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date:
Length:
This recording begins with Mary Rohan’s account of the political situation in Ireland after the formation of the Free State and her career in secondary teaching in the Ursuline Convent in Limerick city. She discusses how difficult it was at that time for a lay person to get a teaching job because of the great number of teaching nuns. Mary describes her happy social life enjoyed in the company of her best friend, Eithne Brennan (mother of politicians Mary O’Rourke and the late Brian Lenihan Senior). Her next position as a teacher was at the Presentation Convent in Thurles, where she had the good fortune to meet GAA founder, Dr Croke. Her next place of employment was in Clontarf, in North County Dublin for most of the 1930s, at the beginning of World War II. She gives a very interesting account of her own interpretation of the personalities of Hitler and Churchill at that time.
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Number of files: 1
File size(s): 63.21 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Mary Rohan (part 4) Mary Rohan (part 4)
Interview location:
Audio series: Cork city, first series
Product ID: CDCKCY01-14
Subject:
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date:
Length:
Mary Rohan arrived back in Cork city with her husband, John Rohan, during the Emergency period, provided much fascinating information about the management of domestic affairs at that time, and the careful utilisation of everyday items. She recalls her husband’s work in a chemist’s shop in Oliver Plunkett Street, later managing it and eventually becoming its owner. It was interesting to record stories about the ‘glimmerman’, whose job it was to look out for the illegal use of the gas supply. She recalled her visits regularly to the Opera House, which provided great entertainment and was a distraction from mundane everyday life. She recalls the garden allotments which were allocated to neighbours in Montenotte for the growing of vegetables where the size of the plot was proportionate to the number in the family. This recording brought to an end an incredible and most valuable collection of memories from Mary Rohan, a truly wonderful lady.
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Number of files: 1
File size(s): 60.10 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Joe O'Driscoll Joe O'Driscoll
Interview location:
Audio series: Cork city, first series
Product ID: CDCKCY01-23
Subject:
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date:
Length:
Joe O’Driscoll has been in the boat-building business for all of his working life, as was his father before him. In this recording, Joe recalls that his father began work in a boatyard in Baltimore, and later moved into management of the Naval Dockyard at Haulbowline. He explains that the craft in earlier days were all wooden-framed. During the Second World War, Joe’s father purchased the ‘Ice Sail’, a three-masted sail training ship, and formed the South of Ireland Shipping Company. Through working with his father, Joe grew to love the trade of boat-building and later set up his own business in Ringaskiddy. Also, in this recording Joe talks about the drawing-loft, and the great Cork boat builders who served their time with himself and his father. Joe went on to manage a boatyard in Crosshaven, employing 45 people until 1973, and he speaks at great length about the Air India crash in the 1980s and recalls that the remains of the passengers and the debris were brought to another of his boatyards, the O’Driscoll Boat Building Company in Baltimore, which had been hired by the government for this purpose.
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Number of files: 1
File size(s): 64.55 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Betty Murphy (Part 2) Betty Murphy (Part 2)
Interview location: Wilton, Cork city
Audio series: Cork Theatrical Collection
Product ID: CDCKCY02-06
Subject: Music, song and dance
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date: 2009
Length: 55:11
Track 1: While looking through old memorabilia, she discusses some of the actors and actresses who performed in Cork down through the years. Track 2: The people who worked to make the Gilbert and Sullivan shows in Cork a success. Track 3: Other performances at different venues around the city and the dress designers. Track 4: Betty’s recollections of the Emergency period in Cork City and her family’s tannery business. Track 5: Other businesses in the city. Track 6: A discussion on the talent of James Stack and his driving force, and some additional family stories, to do with wartime experiences and sport.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 19.63 MB, 8.70 MB, 4.83 MB, 14.53 MB, 5.77 MB, 9.75 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Madoline O’Connell (née Horgan) Madoline O’Connell (née Horgan)
Interview location: Cork City
Audio series: Cork Theatrical Collection
Product ID: CDCKCY02-32
Subject: Lady medical doctor
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date: 2010
Length: 72:20
Track 1: Tracing her father’s ancestors, and growing up in the 1910s and 1920s in the Big House. Her mother’s untimely death when Madoline was five years old. She traces her mother’s side of the family, and her education, boarding school and UCC in the 1930s are recalled. Track 2: Her interest in anatomy and her graduation in medicine. Track 3: Emigration to England in 1940, soon after the outbreak of war. Travelling to Worcester. Meeting her husband-to-be. Her medical work. Track 4: Returning to Ireland in 1950 and starting work as an orthopaedic surgeon in St Finbarr’s Hospital, Cork. Track 5: Social life in Cork City in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Track 6: A discussion on the Economic War in the 1930s and how it affected the O’Connell’s farm in Macroom. Track 7: Family photograph albums, and a discussion on Madoline’s family home. Track 8: Madoline traces her family connections to the Somervilles.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 13.83 MB, 19.44 MB, 10.24 MB, 4.92 MB, 11.59 MB, 5.14 MB, 7.59 MB, 10.13 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Denis Hayes (part 1) Denis Hayes (part 1)
Interview location: Kilkenny
Audio series: Cork Theatrical Collection
Product ID: CDCKCY02-35
Subject: Memories of west Cork and the Forestry Commission
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Recording date: 2011
Length: 74:01
Track 1: Denis was born in 1915 in Glandore, west Cork. He discusses the maternal side of his family, the O’Sullivans, who had a public house in the village, which also sold hardware and groceries. His father was a naval officer in the First World War. He describes his days in the National School for Industry, in Leap. Track 2: A discussion on the Ascendancy families in the area, and the relationship between Protestants and Catholics in the area. Track 3: Anecdotal stories about the Black and Tans, the fishing, farming and mining families in the locality. Track 4: In 1936, joining the Forestry Service, after his short teaching career in Dunmanway. Track 5: The different locations he was transferred to during the Emergency period. Track 6: Recalling the family-run sawmills in the midlands, the cutting and carting of large trees from the estates of landed gentry and the planting of fire trees in the 1950s. He recalls a meeting in Shannonbridge held by the Land Commission, attended by Oliver Flanagan. Finally, he discusses his memories of the Eucharistic Congress in 1932, and de Valera’s visit to West Cork.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 9.41 MB, 13.03 MB, 8.40 MB, 15.10 MB, 18.02 MB, 10.03 MB, 10.81 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Recordings 1-10 of 56 Next Last

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