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Contents: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection


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111 recordings found for your search

Recordings 1-111
Interviewee: Liam Archer (b. 1931) Liam Archer (b. 1931)
Interview location: Clontarf, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-001
Subject: Archer, Liam (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 74:00
Track 1: Liam Archer details his father Liam Archer’s family background and his work as a sorter in the Telegraph Office in the GPO prior to the Rising in 1916. He provides an account of his father’s movements as a Section Leader before the Rising, his time in the Four Courts during the conflict and also an account of his uncle, Edward Archer. Both brothers were members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and they later joined the Volunteers. Track 2: Liam Archer’s injury inflicted during the Rising, and his subsequent treatment at Richmond Hospital, are discussed. Liam refers to his father Liam Archer’s diaries and discusses his orders to set Jameson’s Distillery on fire. Track 3: Contains a description of Liam Archer’s involvement in the War of Independence, working as an Intelligence Agent for Michael Collins, and a description of how the messages he deciphered from morse code were handed to Collins. The character of Liam Archer is recalled by his son, who grew up in Portobello Barracks. Track 4: The Civil War years and Liam Archer’s involvement in the Signals Corps in the Irish Army, being appointed Chief of Staff in 1958, are recalled. During the Emergency he became an advisor to Éamon de Valera, and was Director of G2 Intelligence. His sister married Dermot O’Hegarty, whose roles included Chief Clerk of the First Dáil, and Director of Organisation, IRA, 1920. Track 5: Contains a discussion on Liam Archer’s diaries which he began to write in 1937, and readings from same. The 1966 Commemorations and the pageantry at that time are recalled. Liam’s views on Irish history during the early period of the 20th century, as filtered through his father’s diaries, are described. Track 6: An introduction to “Cawstle Cawtholics” is included in this track, as is a discussion on the strict security in place at the GPO between 1916 and 1922. Liam Archer recalls coming into ownership of his father’s papers in the 1960s, and he describes his reaction to the contents.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 8.12 MB, 7.36 MB, 9.42 MB, 10.39 MB, 12.11 MB, 20.39 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Eileen Quinn (b. 1931) Eileen Quinn (b. 1931)
Interview location: Dalkey, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-002
Subject: Ashe, Tomás (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 52:31
Track 1: This track contains an outline of the background of the Ashe family of Kinard, Co. Kerry, and of her father, Gregory Ashe’s childhood there. His emigration to America at the age of 17 is mentioned where he was to learn of the death of his brother, Tomás. Track 2: The tradition of teaching in the Ashe family, and Tomás Ashe’s love of music, particularly pipe-playing, and of the Irish language and culture, are discussed. Eileen Quinn recalls being present on the occasion of the burial of Peadar Kearney (who wrote the National Anthem), for which the grave of Tomás Ashe was opened. Track 3: The roles Gregory Ashe played in the War of Independence and the Civil War, following his return from America, are recalled. He lived with his sister, Nora Ashe, in Dublin during the War of Independence, where he met his future wife, Bríd Clare. The funeral of Tomás Ashe, in September 1917 in Dublin, is described by Eileen Quinn, as the details were related to her by her mother, Bríd, who was in attendance. Track 4: A discussion follows on the battle of Ashbourne. Eileen Quinn recalls being told of an invitation issued by Tomás Ashe to Roger Casement to come to Corduff School where Ashe taught, to discuss his adventures in Africa. A description is given of the way in which Gregory Ashe, while a member of the local IRA Brigade, saved Burnham House in Dingle from burning during the Civil War. The reasons why the Ashe family moved from Kinard on the Dingle Peninusla, to Straffan, Co. Kildare, are explored. Track 5: The meeting of Gregory Ashe with Ernie O’Malley, during which the latter recorded the former on his activities during the 1916-1923 period, is recalled. Eileen Quinn’s regret at the sale of family memorabilia some years ago is described, as is her pride in retaining family correspondence between her father, Gregory Ashe, and his brother Tomás and other family members. Track 6: Excerpts are read from a letter written by Gregory Ashe to his sister, Nora, dated 3 November 1917, following the death of their brother Tomás.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 10.69 MB, 6.67 MB, 9.68 MB, 7.78 MB, 9.37 MB, 3.94 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Kevin Barry (b. 1941) Kevin Barry (b. 1941)
Interview location: Hacketstown, Co. Carlow
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-003
Subject: Barry, Kevin (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 67:58
Track 1: The Barry family home near Hacketstown in Co. Carlow is described in detail, as is the Fenian connection to the Barrys. Track 2: The interviewee’s father, Michael Barry, and his two aunts, Kate and Sheila Barry, together with their republican affinities, are recalled. The capture of Kevin Barry in September 1920, his sentence to death in Mountjoy Jail and his execution, are described. Some of his personal belongings, such as his prayer book which was on his person when he died, are displayed. The interviewee’s father, Michael Barry, was also very active in the republican movement, and his activities are described. Track 3: Michael Barry was arrested at his home near Hacketstown in December 1920, and this event is recalled by his son, as are the executions carried out during the Civil War. Track 4: The difficulties experienced by Michael Barry in readjusting to normal farming and family life, following years on the run, are examined. Some literature and posters, printed for propaganda purposes prior to and during the years of the Civil War, are displayed and discussed. Track 5: Features a discussion on the Old IRA, comparing the organisation to its counterpart of more recent decades. Track 6: The interviewee’s membership of Fianna Fáil is discussed, and a secret passageway in the Barry home, which was used by revolutionaries on the run over the generations, is examined. Track 7: The funeral of Kevin Barry, and his later reinterment, are discussed, as are the great sacrifices endured by the Barry family, due to the strong republican stance to which they adhered. The refusal of a state pension by Kevin Barry’s mother, who lived in a flat in Molesworth Street in Dublin, and who died in the Bon Secours hospital in Glasnevin, is discussed.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 5.35 MB, 13.31 MB, 4.10 MB, 14.32 MB, 7.63 MB, 9.76 MB, 7.84 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: John Beazley (b. 1966) John Beazley (b. 1966)
Interview location: Killarney, Co. Kerry
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-004
Subject: Béaslaí, Piaras (Interviewee’s second cousin)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 68:46
Track 1: The background of the Beazley family from the vicinity of Killarney, Co. Kerry is discussed, and John Beazley’s connection to poet and writer, Piaras Béaslaí, who was born and reared in Liverpool, is described. While there, Béaslaí became a member of the Gaelic League and was later invited, by Cathal Brugha, to join the IRB in Dublin. Track 2: Piaras Béaslaí’s use of his writing talents to further the cause of Irish nationalism is explored. John Beazley explains that his information on his relative was gleaned from his own research, from which he discovered that Béaslaí was angered by the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin MacNeill, and that during the Rising, he was second in command to Ned Daly, based in Church Street and North King Street. Track 3: Contains an exploration of Piaras Beaslaí’s terms of imprisonment in Portland and Lewes jails, and his return to Killarney on many visits in the following years, keeping in close contact with the Irish Volunteers there. Track 4: Béaslaí’s election to the First Dáil as Sinn Féin member for East Kerry is recalled, and John Beazley’s discovery, early in his life, of the legacy of his cousin which had been downplayed by his family, is explained. The family resemblance between the interviewee and his cousin, Piaras Béaslaí, is commented upon. Track 5: The background to the 1926 publication of Piaras Béaslaí’s two volume biography of Michael Collins: Michael Collins and the Making of a New Ireland, is discussed. Also explained is Béaslaí’s pro-Treaty stance and details are provided about an important speech he made at the time, which served to influence many people. Track 6: Following the signing of the Treaty, Piaras Béaslaí travelled to America to speak in support of its terms, while his fellow countyman, Austin Stack, simultaneously spoke there against the Treaty. During the Civil War, Béaslaí worked as an Irish Army press censor, and this work is discussed. The position of Seán Maguire, son of Lily Merin, at the funeral of Piaras Béaslaí in 1965, is discussed in detail, together with an outline of the work of Lily Merin in identifying British agents prior to Bloody Sunday, 21 November 1920, and her close friendship with Piaras Béaslaí. The deposit of the Piaras Béaslaí Archive in the National Library of Ireland is also mentioned. Track 7: John Beazley describes the background to the Victorian house he occupies in Killarney, which was once owned by Col. Leahy.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.10 MB, 8.82 MB, 5.26 MB, 9.69 MB, 6.95 MB, 17.97 MB, 8.26 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Joseph Bevan (b. 1932) Joseph Bevan (b. 1932)
Interview location: Miltown Rd., Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-005
Subject: Bevan, Charles (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 52:54
Track 1: Charles Bevan’s career as a compositor, joining the Irish Volunteers, and his involvement in the Howth gun-running, are described. Rose Costello, Charles Bevan’s future wife, who was born in America of Cavan parents, is recalled. She was a member of Cumann na mBan under the command of May Gibney, Track 2: The events of Easter Week are described. The fact that Charles Bevan was the first man into the Four Courts on Easter Monday 1916, under the command of Ned Daly, is emphasised. Charles’s younger brother, Jim Bevan, was a messenger, his father, another brother, Tommy, and two sisters were also involved in the Rising. Charles Bevan worked with the Irish Press. His job as a compositor working with a Monotype hot-metal typesetting machine meant that he, who had a good knowledge of Irish, set the print for the Irish Constitution (1937), as gaeilge. Track 3: The courtmartial of Charles Bevan is recalled, as is his imprisonment in various English jails. The reasons why he wrote his account of the immediate aftermath of Easter Week 1916 during the 1950s, and the reasons why he did not become involved in the Civil War, are set out. Track 4: The visit to Kilmainham Jail made by Joseph Bevan with his father Charles, on the day of the official Commemoration at Easter1966, is recalled. Charles Bevan’s career as a compositor and then proofreader with the Irish Press newspaper, until the 1960s, is described. Track 5: Accounts given to Joseph Bevan by his father of incidents during the reign of the Black and Tans in Ireland are retold. Track 6: The misgivings, and a slight feeling of disapproval towards Free State personnel held by Charles Bevan are described, although he resigned from the IRA a few weeks before the outbreak of hostilities, being, as he said “unwilling and unable to take up arms” against his former comrades.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 7.89 MB, 8.41 MB, 8.75 MB, 5.90 MB, 11.64 MB, 5.89 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 1 Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 1
Interview location: Sutton, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-006
Subject: Boland, Gerald and Boland, Harry (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 73:41
Track 1: Harry Boland discusses his family background, his grandfather James Boland, his father, Gerald, and his uncles, Harry and Edmund Boland. Harry Boland was responsible for the introduction of Michael Collins to the IRB and the interviewee recalls his father, Gerald, always distrusted Collins. Track 2: Harry Boland speaks of his family’s involvement in the 1916 Rising – due to the Countermanding Order by Eoin MacNeill, his father, Gerald, had gone home, and could get back into the city only as far as Jacob’s. Harry’s uncles were in the Metropole. Reminiscences about his schooldays, being educated by the Christian Brothers, and the 1916 Commemorations in his school in 1966, are also described by Harry Boland. Track 3: A discussion follows on the original letters written by the interviewee’s uncle, Harry, to Kitty Kiernan. The interviewee describes his memories of his father’s involvement in organising the Fianna Fáil party, being one of the key people in the party at that time. Track 4: The interviewee reflects on Arthur Griffith’s response to the signing of the Treaty, the influence exerted by Frank Aiken over Éamon de Valera during the Emergency, and the visit paid by de Valera to the Boland home when Gerald Boland was dying. An unexpected visit to the Boland home by Richard Mulcahy, who had been Minister for Defence in the Free State Government, is recalled. Harry Boland reads excerpts from letters written by Gerald Boland during his time in Mountjoy Prison, and he points out that some further letters still remain with the Department of Justice. Track 5: Details of the killing of Harry Boland during the Civil War, and memories of the character of Gerald Boland, are recalled. The reasons why Gerald Boland left the IRB after the 1916 Rising are explained. Track 6: Harry Boland describes the funeral of his uncle, Harry Boland, the attendance, and the iconic painting of the funeral by Jack Butler Yeats, RHA. The next generation, and the taking on of the mantle in political life, are discussed. The invitation by Harry Boland (interviewee) to Charles Haughey to join Fianna Fáil when in UCD, and his subsequent candidacy for election, are discussed. Gerald Boland’s military medals, and their importance within the Boland family, are mentioned. Track 7: Harry Boland speaks about his aunt, Kathleen Boland, a member of Cumann na mBan. The funeral of Gerald Boland and the people who attended are recalled. The Arms Trial is mentioned, along with the interviewee’s views of the new and the old IRA and the politics of today. (The arms trials of 1970 constituted a series of trials following the dismissal by Taoiseach Jack Lynch of Charles Haughey and Neil Blaney.)
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 5.55 MB, 8.85 MB, 8.56 MB, 7.63 MB, 8.67 MB, 12.50 MB, 15.77 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 2 Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 2
Interview location: Sutton, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-007
Subject: Boland, Gerald and Boland, Harry (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 64:22
Track 1: Harry Boland discusses the Fenian membership of his grandfather, James Boland, and the great passion for Irish freedom which he passed on to his children; Gerald, who was born in Manchester, Harry, Edmund and Kathleen. Gerald Boland’s time in Jacob’s during the 1916 Rising is discussed, and interviewee Harry Boland’s own visit to Jacob’s as a student, is recalled. Track 2: Details are provided about the reasons why Éamon de Valera sent a delegation, which included Gerald Boland, to Russia in 1924. Gerald Boland’s involvement in the formation of the Fianna Fáil party and his stance on the Boundary Commission are also discussed. Track 3: Interviewee Harry Boland discusses his introduction of Maureen Lemass to Charles Haughey while both were B.Comm. students in UCD. The setting up of the Haughey Boland accountancy business (now Deloitte Ireland) is explained. Bunny Carr, a friend of the Bolands, is mentioned and an anecdote involving the LDF is told. Track 4: The interviewee, Harry Boland, describes his introduction of Charles Haughey into politics. Track 5: The Fianna Fáil Tomás O’Cléirigh Cumann in Dublin is recalled, as are the people associated with it. It later divided and one section became known as the Harry Boland Cumann. The reasons for the interviewee’s later resignation are discussed, as is TACA, the successful fundraising group established to support the Fianna Fáil organisation at general elections. Track 6: Contains a discussion on The Arms Trial and the people associated therewith. The split in the Fianna Fáil party is described and the change in personality in Charles Haughey during his political life are explored. Track 7: Interviewee Harry Boland’s views on the ethos of the Fianna Fáil party during his father Gerald Boland’s time are described, and he also discusses his feelings of responsibility to support the organisation because of his family connections, though he feels that his continued support is now very much in doubt.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 8.75 MB, 6.43 MB, 8.88 MB, 6.56 MB, 13.35 MB, 9.68 MB, 5.36 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Eileen Barrington (b. 1929) Eileen Barrington (b. 1929)
Interview location: Monkstown, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-008
Subject: Boland, Kathleen and O’Donovan, Seán (Interviewee’s parents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 58:03
Track 1: Eileen Barrington, daughter of Kathleen Boland, recalls her mother’s descriptions of her family’s involvement in the preparations for, and the aftermath of the 1916 Rising. Kathleen Boland’s fundraising trip to America with Hanna Sheehy Skeffington is described. (Hanna Sheehy Skeffington was the widow of Francis Sheehy Skeffington who was shot illegally in Portobello Barracks by Captain Bowen-Colthurst at the beginning of the Rising.) She also gives an account of her paternal family. Track 2: Contains a description of the initial meeting of her mother with her future huband, Seán O’Donovan, who had attended the same school as Michael Collins at Lisavaird, Clonakilty, Co. Cork. Track 3: The story of the Russian Crown Jewels is explained in detail, with contributions from Eileen’s husband, Donal Barrington. Track 4: Kathleen Boland’s friends from the 1916 period are recalled, as is her father’s great interest in the Irish language. The military medals awarded to members of the Boland family, together with their whereabouts, are mentioned. Track 5: Kathleen Boland and Seán O’Donovan’s involvement in the Civil War is recalled, as are Eileen’s maternal and paternal families, and their involvement in republicanism. A Certificate of Appointment as the first Irish Ambassador from the Revolutionary Republic to the United States of America, given to Harry Boland, Kathleen’s brother, is mentioned. Eileen also describes the effects of the Civil War on her parents. Track 6: Eileen reads from a family record written by her father in 1971, detailing his education, his entry into the Irish Volunteers, his involvement in the War of Independence, the Civil War and his personal and working life.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 4.58 MB, 8.45 MB, 6.95 MB, 11.92 MB, 10.67 MB, 10.64 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Seán Boylan (b. 1943) Seán Boylan (b. 1943)
Interview location: Dunboyne, Co. Meath
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-009
Subject: Boylan, Seán (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 61:55
Track 1: The involvement in the 1916 Rising of the four Boylan brothers, Seán, Ned, Joe and Peter, is described by Seán Boylan. He also describes the capture of his uncle, Peter Boylan, in Canada in 1915, when he was carrying despatches for the IRB. The background to the Boylan family in Dunboyne, Co. Meath, and their support of Charles Stewart Parnell, is also discussed. Track 2: The Boylan family’s involvement in the Rising, including that of his aunt, Mary Jane Boylan, is discussed. Seán recounts stories about the events of Easter Week as they were told to him by his father, Seán, and other family members. Track 3: Contains a description of the injury from explosives suffered by Seán Boylan Senior in 1919, during the War of Independence, his testimony to the Bureau of Military History and his dissatisfaction with this process. Seán Boylan recounts an anecdote told to him by a comrade of his father’s on the occasion of Seán Boylan’s removal following his death. Track 4: The reasons why the Boylan family took the Free State side following the signing of the Treaty, and the request to Seán Boylan Senior, by the Irish Army, for his assistance at the Curragh Camp in 1922, are explained. The interviewee describes his discovery, during the 1966 Commemorations, of the importance of his father’s role in Irish history. Tracks 5-7: Contains a discussion on the many family connections to the 1916 Rising which Seán encountered during his schooldays at Belvedere College in Dublin. His views on his father’s role in Irish history are discussed, as is the reason why the interviewee was called ‘Camillus’, being named after the Capuchin priest who attended his father on the night before his planned execution, which was later commuted.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.71 MB, 10.50 MB, 6.24 MB, 5.10 MB, 10.55 MB, 9.78 MB, 7.89 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Edward Brennan (b. 1931) Edward Brennan (b. 1931)
Interview location: Tallaght, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-010
Subject: Brennan, Edward; Brennan, Francis and Brennan, Eugene (Interviewee’s father and uncles respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 59:43
Track 1: Edward Brennan outlines the British Army ranks of the three Dublin Brennan brothers in 1916, and explains that his father, Edward Brennan, served with the Irish Guards, and fought in France in 1915 to 1918. His uncle, Francis Brennan, served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and another uncle, Eugene Brennan, was in the Royal Irish Rifles, serving in France in 1914 and 1915. The Brennan family background in Usher’s Island in Dublin is explained. Track 2: Eighteen-year old Francis Brennan, who was stationed in Dublin during the 1916 Rising with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was fatally wounded in Ellis Quay by the Irish Volunteers under Seán Heuston in the Mendicity Institution, and this is discussed by Edward Brennan, whose grandfather, Charles Brennan, was employed on the railways. Track 3: The interviewee’s aunt, Elizabeth Brennan, witnessed the British forces leaving Dublin in 1921, and she was recorded by her grandson. Edward Brennan discusses this recording. An excerpt from the recording is played, and the complete recording forms part of the Irish Life and Lore 1916 Rising Oral History collection. Track 4: Contains an explanation of the strong reaction of a family who had shared a tenement in Chapelizod with the Brennan family, when the latter family were rehoused in 1938. Edward Brennan’s uncle, Eugene Brennan, who served with the Royal Irish Rifles in WWI, was present at Christmas in 1914 when the British and the German troops ceased fire for the duration in a well-documented event in history. A short time later, Eugene Brennan was killed in France. Track 5: The interviewee explains that it was not until after his father’s death that he discovered that his uncle, Francis Brennan, was killed during the Rising. Tracks 6-7: Edward Brennan explains that his mother, Mary Marshall, was orphaned as a child and was placed in the South Dublin Union, from where she was later boarded out. Brennan family memorabilia is displayed and discussed.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 4.83 MB, 5.83 MB, 7.15 MB, 2.87 MB, 8.73 MB, 9.91 MB, 15.39 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Attracta Maher (b. 1930) and Sr. Joanna (Phyllis) Brennan-Whitmore (b. 1927) Attracta Maher (b. 1930) and Sr. Joanna (Phyllis) Brennan-Whitmore (b. 1927)
Interview location: Blackrock, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-011
Subject: Brennan-Whitmore, William J. (Interviewees’ father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 58:52
Track 1: The background to the Brennan-Whitmore name is explained by Attracta Maher (née Brennan-Whitmore), and her sister, Sr. Joanna, as are details of William Brennan-Whitmore’s family circumstances. He was stationed in India with the British Army as a young man, where he met his mentor and friend, Fr. Mullen, who introduced him to Irish nationalism. Track 2: Due to ill health, Brennan-Whitmore resigned from the army, and in 1910 he joined Sinn Féin and began to train Irish Volunteers in Wexford. His lack of awareness of the existence of the IRB is discussed, as is his admiration for James Connolly. His preference for guerrilla warfare over the stand taken by the revolutionaries in 1916, and the blood sacrifice involved therewith, is explored. During the Rising, he was Officer Commanding in the North Earl Street area. Track 3: This track contains details of the promise made by Brennan-Whitmore to his comrades in Frongoch Camp, North Wales, following the Rising, that he would utilise his journalistic skills to write a book detailing their experiences there. This book, With the Irish in Frongoch, was published in 1917. A discussion follows on the circumstances surrounding his decision to write his second book, Dublin Burning. Track 4: The effects of the Civil War on Commandant W. J.Brennan-Whitmore are discussed, as is his purchase of a farm near Gorey, Co. Wexford, from the Land Commission, where he reared his family. His friendship with Michael Collins is explored. A discussion follows on the shooting at Béal na Bláth, and Brennan-Whitmore’s assertion that the responsibility for Collins’s death lay with his own side. Track 5: W. J. Brennan-Whitmore’s support of Eoin O’Duffy is recalled, though he was never a member of the Blueshirts. His attempts to set up an Occupational Guild System of National Government are explained. His strongly-held belief that guerrilla warfare, instead of a Rising in 1916, would have had a more successful outcome, and his writing of a pamphlet on this subject at the time, is discussed. His daughters further discuss his retirement from the Irish Army in 1926, and his views on politics during his lifetime. Track 6: The 1966 Commemorations are recalled, as is W. J. Brennan-Whitmore’s reluctance to attend. Military medals, family records and pensions are discussed. Track 7: Reference is made to Brennan-Whitmore’s closest friends, and his work on the production of The Echo newspaper in Gorey, Co. Wexford.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.28 MB, 7.66 MB, 7.72 MB, 6.29 MB, 13.68 MB, 6.89 MB 5.44 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Déirdre Stuart (b. 1946) Déirdre Stuart (b. 1946)
Interview location: Dundrum, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-012
Subject: Brugha, Cathal and MacSwiney, Terence (Interviewee’s grandfathers)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 42:47
Track 1: The fact that both her grandfathers, Cathal Brugha and Terence MacSwiney, gave their lives for Irish freedom is discussed by Déirdre Stuart. She also recalls her normal and balanced upbringing. The family’s connection to An Ghráig, Ballyferriter in Kerry, and its importance to her parents, is also discussed. Track 2: The connections Déirdre had during her childhood with other children with family connections to those involved in the 1916 Rising are mentioned. Déirdre recalls an interview given by her father, Ruairí Brugha, to RTÉ relating to his father’s death. Also recalled is footage filmed by her father of his mother, Caitlín Brugha. Track 3: Déirdre Stuart recalls her grand-aunt Eithne MacSwiney’s demeanour and personality and also the fact that her mother, Máire Brugha, did not discuss aspects of her family background pertaining to her mother, Muriel, until quite late in her life. Track 4: The widows of the men of 1916 and the connections and support they maintained between one another is discussed. Déirdre recalls her education at the Sacred Heart Convent in Leeson Street, Dublin. Track 5: Déirdre’s father Ruairí Brugha’s tolerant and peaceful character, and his work behind the scenes in the Northern Ireland peace negotiations during his political career, are recalled. Track 6: Déirdre Stuart stresses her admiration of the ability of her widowed grandmother, Caitlín Kingston, to raise a large family in the absence of a pension. Her father’s lack of interest in military medals, or recognition of any kind for his life’s work is discussed, as is the background to the Burgess (Brugha) family.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 7.76 MB, 6.82 MB, 7.52 MB, 6.75 MB, 5.18 MB, 5.20 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Cathal Brugha (b. 1949) Cathal Brugha (b. 1949)
Interview location: UCD, Belfield, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-013
Subject: Brugha, Cathal (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 53:34
Track 1: The background to the Brugha and the MacSwiney families is explored by Cathal Brugha and he discusses his feelings on the reasons why his grandfather changed his name from Charles Burgess to the Irish version – Cathal Brugha. He discusses his grandfather’s role in the 1916 Rising, and he describes his efforts to bring order and discipline to bear during the War of Independence. Also mentioned is his grandfather’s admiration for Roger Casement and Seán MacDiarmada. Track 2: The interviewee’s views on the Rising are recorded, as are his impressions of his grandmother, Caitlín Kingston, who raised six children following the death of her husband, Cathal. The interviewee’s account of the killing of his grandfather following the occupation of The Four Courts in 1922, and the assistance provided by the British from Enniskillen in the attack on the building at that time, is outlined. The attempts by Cathal Brugha to bring an end to the fighting – attempts which led to his death – are also described. Track 3: The interviewee recounts the election of his grandfather to the First Dáil, his fluency in the Irish language and its use by him in documentation. He discusses the reasons why his grandfather voted in favour of his and Éamon de Valera’s non-attendance at the Treaty negotiations in London in 1921. The death of the interviewee’s father, Ruairí Brugha, and the assistance afforded to his grandmother following her husband Cathal Brugha’s death is also recalled. Track 4: Cathal Brugha’s term in the First Dáil, and his proposition, adopted in 1919, on the taking of an Oath of Allegiance to the Irish Republic, are discussed. The fact that the interviewee’s grandfather was the first Irish Minister to be shot in the 1922-1923 period is also mentioned. The Brugha family’s decision to always refuse Government pensions and military medals, and the reasons for this decision, are explored. The interviewee recalls some anecdotes relating to his education at Gonzaga College in Ranelagh, Dublin, and the attendance there of descendants of other Irish revolutionaries.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 20.57 MB, 7.89 MB, 12.51 MB, 8.13 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Jeanne Bulfin (b. 1931) Jeanne Bulfin (b. 1931)
Interview location: Rathgar, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-014
Subject: Bulfin, Éamon (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 53:00
Track 1: Jeanne Bulfin’s grandfather, William Bulfin, emigrated from Ireland to Argentina in the late 1800s, where his son Éamon was born in 1883. The family returned to Ireland in 1902 and later Éamon attended Newbridge College in Co. Kildare. Track 2: Éamon Bulfin later attended St. Enda’s, where he became a favourite pupil of principal P. H. Pearse, explains Jeanne Bulfin. He later became a teacher at the school. His passion for history and learning is described. The fact that his two uncles, Frank and Joe Bulfin, were active in the Land War and were members of the IRB, is recalled by Jeanne. Track 3: Éamon Bulfin’s involvement with munitions at St. Enda’s is described. His presence on the rooftop of the GPO during the week of the Rising is recalled. An anecdote told by her father about the involvement of Cumann na mBan, is recounted by Jeanne Bulfin. Track 4: The two flags raised on the roof of the GPO during Easter Week 1916 are discussed. The bond formed between Éamon Bulfin and Michael Collins in Frongoch Camp in Wales, following the Rising, is discussed, as is Éamon’s devastation on learning of the death of Collins in August 1922. Track 5: The deportation of Éamon Bulfin by the British to Argentina after his release from Durham Jail in May 1919, and the efforts of his uncle, Frank Bulfin are recalled, as the latter attempted to change the decision of the Authorities on the matter. Track 6: Éamon Bulfin’s response to the events of the Civil War on his return to Ireland at the end of 1922, is discussed. Track 7: Éamon’s appointment by de Valera as Consul to Angentina in 1919, are discussed, as is the reason for this decision by de Valera. The career of Éamon Bulfin as a rate collector for Offaly is also recalled. Nora Brick from Tralee, Co. Kerry, who had worked for Kerry republican, Austin Stack, became Éamon’s wife. She is recalled by her daughter, Jeanne, who reads from a letter written by her father to her mother about the horrors of the Civil War. The visits of Éamon Bulfin’s compatriots to the family home are recalled, as is his deep love for Ireland.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 10.73 MB, 2.81 MB, 5.78 MB, 9.28 MB, 2.81 MB, 5.78 MB, 9.28 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Éanna de Búrca (b. 1930) Éanna de Búrca (b. 1930)
Interview location: Foxrock, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-015
Subject: Burke, Frank (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 71:23
Track 1: Éanna de Búrca describes his father Frank Burke’s background and his education at St. Enda’s. Frank Burke later worked as a teacher at the school. Track 2: Frank Burke joined the Irish Volunteers in 1913, having previously been a member of Fianna Éireann. (Fianna Éireann was a republican youth movement founded by Countess Markievicz and Bulmer Hobson in 1909 in Dublin.) Éanna describes his father’s introduction by Con Colbert (who was executed after the Rising) into the IRB, the preparations for the Rising and his father’s movements during the Rising. Frank Burke was stationed on the roof of the GPO for the duration. (The St. Enda’s boys were stationed on the roof.) His meeting with his future wife, Angela Curran, while he was in Stafford Jail in England, is also described by their son. Track 3: Frank Burke’s days in Frongoch Camp in North Wales are described, including the activities there and the teaching of military tactics. His emotional meeting with his sister, Aoife, on his return to Carbury, Co. Kildare, following his release, is described. His return to teaching and later joining the staff of St. Enda’s in 1919 during the War of Independence are discussed. (St. Enda’s, or Scoil Éanna, was established by P. H. Pearse in September 1908. A bilingual school, it accommodated boarders and day pupils.) Track 4: Contains a description of Frank Burke’s hurling and football skills and his fine successes in both codes. On Bloody Sunday, he was marking Michael Hogan of Tipperary, who was shot and killed by the Black and Tans while playing for his team against Dublin at Croke Park in November 1920. (Bloody Sunday: On 21 November 1920, Collins’s Squad assassinated fourteen British Intelligence agents in Dublin. Later that day, Black and Tans entered Croke Park and shot a number of spectators and one player, Michael Hogan.) Track 5: Éanna de Búrca recalls his aunt Aoife Burke who was a nurse. He relates an anecdote involving his father and an RIC officer at a checkpoint during the War of Independence. He shares his memories of his father’s associates from 1916, and from Frongoch, who would later visit his father at the family home. Frank Burke’s brief tenure as one of Collins’s Twelve Apostles (also known as the Squad) is mentioned, and his feelings towards Collins after the signing of the Treaty are described. (The Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed at 2.10 a.m. on 6 December 1921 in London.) Track 6: Details of Frank Burke’s appointment as Headmaster at St. Enda’s, and his career there, are discussed, as is his and his wife Angela’s support for Fianna Fáil. Éanna de Búrca recalls asking his father why he supported the party, and his reply was that de Valera’s policies and ideals were closest to those of P. H. Pearse. Track 7: Éanna de Búrca was a godson of Margaret Pearse, mother of P. H. Pearse, and he recalls living in the bungalow specially built by her to accommodate the Headmaster and Assistant Headmaster at St. Enda’s. Track 8: Éanna de Búrca gives his views on the 1916 Rising and on the Treaty, and a discussion ensues on a photograph taken in 1916 and a photograph of the same people again taken in 1966. The effects of the Civil War in Ireland and the wounds created at that time are also described. Contains a description of St. Enda’s School and a discussion on its use as a grenade factory before the Rising. The friendship which developed between Frank Burke and P. H. Pearse is explored.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 7.33 MB, 6.94 MB, 7.34 MB, 9.47 MB, 7.92 MB, 4.78 MB, 4.02 MB, 17.61 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Mary Gallagher (b. 1954) Mary Gallagher (b. 1954)
Interview location: Rathfarnham, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-016
Subject: Ceannt, Éamonn (Interviewee’s granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 62:25
Track 1: Mary Gallagher discusses a photograph taken in 1908 featuring her grandfather, Michael Kent, and his siblings including Éamonn Ceannt and his wife Áine. Memories of the various commemorations of 1916 which Mary Gallagher attended, and her enduring love of history, are discussed. Track 2: Diaries which were begun in 1911, handed down to Mary Gallagher from her grandfather, Michael Kent, giving a descriptive account of the Rising, are described. Track 3: Mary Gallagher reads from those diaries which provide an insider’s view of the young lives of her grandfather and her granduncle, Éamonn, including mention of their love of music and the Irish language. Track 4: The closeness of the Kent family at that time is explained and their nationalism is also discussed. Track 5: Éamonn Ceannt’s widow, Áine, is recalled and her harassment by the Black and Tans and later by Free State soldiers, is also mentioned. Track 6: Mary Gallagher reads from a letter written by Éamonn Ceannt on 22 April 1916, two days before the Rising began, which was pasted into her grandfather’s diary. Track 7: Mention is made of Bill Kent, brother of Éamonn, who had served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers since the Boer War and was killed in WWI. The recording of this tragedy in the diary is noted. Áine Ceannt, widow of Éamonn, and her active role in fundraising for needy families of the men killed and imprisoned after the Rising is discussed. A detailed and carefully worded entry from her grandfather’s diary, written on the eve of his brother’s execution, is read by Mary Gallagher. The entry for 7 May 1917 detailing the death of Bill Kent, brother of Éamonn Ceannt, who was killed in action with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers during WWI, is read.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 7.67 MB, 8.83 MB, 5.26 MB, 7.82 MB, 3.98 MB, 5.18 MB, 15.23 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Sr. Íde (Hanora) Woulfe (b.1915) Sr. Íde (Hanora) Woulfe (b.1915)
Interview location: Belfast
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-017
Subject: Colbert, Con (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 67:18
Track 1: Sr. Íde (Hanora) Woulfe’s mother was Catherine Colbert, sister of Con Colbert. Sister Íde explains that following Catherine’s mother’s death in Athea, Co. Limerick, she went to live in Ranelagh in Dublin, where her two sisters and her brother, Con, joined her. Following her marriage Catherine and her husband, Richard Woulfe, moved to Abbeyfeale, Co. Limerick where, during the War of Independence, Richard Woulfe spent a long period on the run. Prior to the 1916 Rising, Sr. Íde’s uncle, Con Colbert, did not discuss his IRB connections with his siblings, she explains. Track 2: Growing up in Abbeyfeale, Sr. Íde recalls the boycotting of her father’s pharmacy by the local people during the Civil War. She also recalls hearing of the involvement of her uncle, Con Colbert, in Fianna Éireann and his love of teaching Irish. Track 3: Contains Sr. Íde’s memories of the old Colbert home in Athea, her mother’s maternal family from Co. Clare, and anecdotes about the Black and Tans in Co. Clare. Track 4: Sr. Íde’s life as a missionary sister is described. Track 5: Sr. Íde recalls the night the Black and Tans raided her family home in Abbeyfeale in search of her father. She mentions the group of women, relatives of men on the run during the Civil War, who would gather to say the Rosary at The Square in Abbeyfeale, and the local response to this. She recalls the confusion she felt as a child on her father’s return home after his years on the run. Track 6: Views on the English establishment, garnered during her time as a teacher in England, are provided by Sr. Íde. She gives an account of her family’s circumstances in former times. Track 7: Sr. Íde’s education, entering the Sisters of St. Louis, her missionary work as a nurse in Ghana, and the colonial system there before the advent of Communism, are all explored.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 7.39 MB, 7.67 MB, 4.85 MB, 2.91 MB, 11.23 MB, 8.92 MB, 18.72 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Con Colbert (b. 1937) Con Colbert (b. 1937)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-018
Subject: Colbert, Con (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 38:52
Track 1: The Colbert family of West Limerick is described by Con Colbert, and he recalls his childhood visits to the family farm in Athea. He also provides details of his uncle Con Colbert’s movements during the 1916 Rising, along with details of his early influences. Track 2: The arrest of Con Colbert and his sentence to be shot in Kilmainham Jail are recalled. His nephew reads from two letters written to his family by Con Colbert while he was awaiting execution. Con Colbert (interviewee) recalls his father, Jim Colbert’s imprisonment at the Curragh Camp and his escape therefrom. He also remembers his mother, Tuam native Rose Ryan, who was imprisoned in Kilmainham Jail during the Civil War. Track 3: Extracts from a report written by a Capuchin priest, present at the execution of Con Colbert in Kilmainham, are read, and the interviewee stresses the importance of the Colbert name to him personally. Jim Colbert, father of the interviewee, was a Sinn Féin TD (later Fianna Fáil TD) for Limerick, elected in 1923. His support for Éamon de Valera is recalled, as is the interviewee’s mother’s views about him. Track 4: A story told to him by his mother is recalled, describing the visit of Countess Markievicz to Athea in 1917. He also recalls the 1916 commemorations through the years, particularly those which occurred in 1966.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 7.18 MB, 10.78 MB, 12.86 MB, 4.80 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Michael Collins Powell (b.1936) Michael Collins Powell (b.1936)
Interview location: Cork City
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-019
Subject: Collins, Michael (Interviewee’s granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 44:08
Track 1: Michael Collins Powell describes his family background and discusses his father, Seán Collins Powell, who was Michael Collins’s nephew. Track 2: A discussion ensues on Michael Collins, his time in England before the 1916 Rising, joining the IRB and his part in the Rising. Details on IRA tactics during the War of Independence are given, and mention is made of the letters written by Michael Collins to his family at home in West Cork during the period 1916 to 1922. Track 3: Michael Collins Powell gives his views on the signing of the Treaty and his granduncle’s understanding of the British mind. The reasons why de Valera was not alerted to the signing of the Treaty are examined. His father, Seán Collins Powell’s belief that Michael Collins had not been properly written into history is discussed. Track 4: The ambush at Beal na Bláth in August 1922, during which Michael Collins was shot, is discussed. A query is raised about the reasons why the medical report following the shooting, compiled by Dr. Oliver St. John Gogarty, was never published. Track 5: The years of the Civil War are examined, including the executions at that time and the breakdown of law and order. A discussion follows on the fact that his father, Seán Collins Powell, served in the Irish Army under the command of his uncle, Michael Collins, during the Civil War. Michael Collins Powell talks about his own early childhood years at the Curragh, where his father was based. An anecdote is told about the taking by the RIC of young Seán Collins Powell’s bicycle when he was attempting to deliver a message in his capacity as a runner for the IRA. The lack of bitterness between the Collins and the de Valera families after the 1916-1923 period is discussed. The scant recognition given to Michael Collins in Cork during the 1966 Commemorations and the family’s subsequent feelings of disappointment are explored.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 6.02 MB, 13.67 MB, 6.10 MB, 7.24 MB, 7.42 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Michael Collins (b. 1925) Michael Collins (b. 1925)
Interview location: Ferrybank, Waterford
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-020
Subject: Collins, Michael (Interviewee’s uncle) (recording courtesy of the Collins Powell family)
Recorded by: Unknown
Recording date: 1997
Length: 59:21
Track 1: The Limerick background of the Collins family in the 1660s is described, as is their relocation to West Cork and the childhood of Michael Collins. His education at Lisavaird school and the great influence brought to bear on him by his teacher, Mr. Lyons, and the local blacksmith, Jim Santry, are explored. His job in the British Civil Service from the age of 16 is also discussed. Track 2: The week of the Rising spent by Michael Collins in the GPO, his arrest, the period at the Rotunda and the march to the North Wall for transportation to Frongoch Camp in North Wales, are all described by the interviewee. He also relates that his mother, Nancy O’Brien, a cousin of Michael Collins, (their grandmothers were sisters), spoke to Collins during this march. Their conversation is detailed. Track 3: The fact that Michael Collins became head of Prisoners’ Aid is mentioned, and another conversation with Nancy O’Brien is detailed, in which Collins discusses his idea of taking on the British through guerrilla warfare. Track 4: The National Loan devised by Michael Collins, which was eventually to raise £287,000, is discussed, as is the inner circle surrounding him, and the Cairo Gang sent from Britain to combat them during the War of Independence. The interviewee recalls carrying the coffins of eight of Collins’s Squad in later years. Track 5: The interviewee recalls a meeting with Dan Breen, who told him that he reported back to Michael Collins following the ambush at Soloheadbeg, Co. Tipperary, on 21 January 1919. (This ambush is often described as the opening ambush of the War of Independence.) Track 6: The nineteen-month period spent in America by Éamon de Valera during the War of Independence, is discussed, as is his visit to London prior to the Treaty negotiations, during which he had a personal meeting with Lloyd George. The interviewee reflects on the Treaty negotiations in London, de Valera’s insistence that Collins be part of the Irish Delegation, and Collins’s reluctance to comply until Batt O’Connor, under orders from de Valera, persuaded him to become part of the Delegation.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 16.65 MB, 5.69 MB, 8.76 MB, 5.87 MB, 10.34 MB, 7.09 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: James Connolly Heron (b. 1949) James Connolly Heron (b. 1949)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-021
Subject: Connolly, James (Interviewee’s great-grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 40:38
Track 1: James Connolly Heron is a great-grandson of James Connolly. His grandmother was Ina Connolly, James Connolly’s daughter, who married Archie Heron. He describes the importance to him of his family history, his great-grandfather’s initial involvement in republicanism and his grandmother’s regret at not being allowed to visit her father while he was awaiting execution in Kilmainham Jail after the 1916 Rising. Track 2: The relationship between James Connolly and P. H. Pearse is discussed, as is the coming together of all the individual groups involved in the Rising. Connolly’s input in the writing of the 1916 Proclamation, and the handing over of his command to a young Volunteer, Seán McLoughlin, towards the end of Easter Week, are also discussed. Track 3: Contains a description of the sacrifices endured by the Connolly family following the Rising, and the support offered by their friends and neighbours. Track 4: James Connolly Heron discusses the refusal of a State pension by his grandfather Archie Heron, who was a bodyguard to Michael Collins during the War of Independence. Track 5: Contains a description of James Connolly the man – his moods, his demeanour and mannerisms. Track 6: The women in the Connolly family down through the generations are recalled, and the family memorabilia is discussed. Track 7: Nora Connolly, James Connolly Heron’s grandaunt, is recalled. She remained a staunch republican throughout her life. She was imprisoned in Kilmainham during the Civil War in 1923 and she was later involved in the restoration of the Jail. James Connolly Heron shares his memories of his grandmother, Ina, and he stresses his belief that her silence regarding her father’s fate is evidence of the huge hurt still felt within the Connolly family.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 7.33 MB, 6.39 MB, 3.97 MB, 3.61 MB, 3.88 MB, 6.37 MB, 5.71 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Niamh O’Sullivan (b. 1948) Niamh O’Sullivan (b. 1948)
Interview location: Connolly Park, Tralee, Co. Kerry
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-022
Subject: Connolly, Seán (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 51:39
Track 1: The Gloucester Street, Dublin, background to the Connolly family is explained. Margaret Connolly, Niamh O’Sullivan’s mother, was one of three children born to Seán and Christina Connolly. A brief outline is provided on the days prior to the Rising and Seán Connolly’s captaincy in the Irish Citizen Army. His fatal shooting in City Hall during the Rising is also discussed. Track 2: Niamh O’Sullivan recalls in detail her grandmother’s stories about her husband Seán, his personality, their initial meeting, their first home in Inchicore in Dublin, and their relocation to No. 3 Mountjoy Square, Dublin, at the invitation of Walter Cole, where Niamh’s mother, Margaret, and her two siblings grew up. Track 3: Contains a description of the activities of Christina Connolly during the War of Independence, and the sending of her children, Margaret, Kevin and Aidan, to Spiddal in Galway for the duration. The burning of the house in which the children lived in Spiddal, by the Black and Tans, is also discussed. Track 4: A description is provided of Margaret Connolly’s childhood recollections of Arthur Griffith, whom she loved. Margaret remembered sitting on Michael Collins’s knee and being thrown up in the air and caught again. On the other hand, the austere nature of Éamon de Valera somewhat overwhelmed her. Track 5: Niamh O’Sullivan recounts her grandmother’s discussions with her regarding her support for the signing of the Treaty following years of conflict, and her assertion that de Valera did not support the signing due to a fit of pique. Walter Cole’s sheltering of her grandmother, following the shooting of her husband Seán, is recalled, as is the great work of the women of Cumann na mBan (Women’s League). The feelings of Christina Connolly on the morning of the departure of her husband, Seán, to take part in the Rising, as she described them to her granddaughter, are related. Her journey to the morgue, to identify and remove her husband’s body, is also described. She was told that, for a fee of 6d, she could take any of the bodies away. It is explained that Seán Connolly was a friend of W. B. Yeats and Maude Gonne, and was a member of the Abbey Theatre.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 10.71 MB, 4.97 MB, 7.36 MB, 9.68 MB, 14.61 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Harry Coyle (b. 1941) Harry Coyle (b. 1941)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-023
Subject: Coyle, Harry (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 38:28
Track 1: The circumstances surrounding the fatal shooting of Harry Coyle in Dublin during the week of the Rising in 1916 are described by his grandson, who also explains that, at that time, his grandmother was heavily pregnant with her son, Harry, the interviewee’s father. The background to the Coyle family, who were slaters in Dublin, is explained. Track 2: Thomas Coyle, the interviewee’s granduncle, was seriously injured while stationed at City Hall during the Rising. An iconic postcard, showing Thomas Coyle in his hospital bed in the Infirmary at Dublin Castle, is displayed and discussed. Thomas was later interned in Frongoch Camp in North Wales. Track 3: Harry Coyle describes his grandmother, originally from Hanover Street in Dublin, and a staunch republican. The close friendship between the O’Rahilly and the Coyle families, following the death of Harry Coyle while trying to assist the dying O’Rahilly at the end of Easter Week, is described. The roll, which contained drafts of the 1916 Proclamation, discovered by the interviewee’s father, Harry Coyle, in the Coyle home in later years, is discussed. Tracks 4-5: Contains a discussion on the thesis written by the interviewee’s son on the experiences of his great-grandfather during the week of the Rising, and excerpts are read from contemporaneous newspaper articles kept by the interviewee’s grandmother. Her decision to decline the offer to have her husband’s remains re-interred in the Republican Plot in Glasnevin Cemetery is also discussed. Track 6: The interviewee’s grandmother’s second marriage, to Joshua Coughlan, who had fought with the British army in WWI, is recalled.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 7.07 MB, 8.56 MB, 14.79 MB, 4.83 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Carol Mullan (b. 1938) Carol Mullan (b. 1938)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-024
Subject: Dalton, Charlie (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 33:12
Track 1: This track details the Dalton family background and the fact that Charlie Dalton was born in Dublin and his older brother, Emmet, was born in the United States. Carol Mullan’s father’s bout of post-traumatic stress disorder in 1923 is also discussed, as is his book With the Dublin Brigade. Track 2: Charlie Dalton’s attempt at the age of 12, to join the IRA, is discussed. His position as one of Michael Collins’s Twelve Apostles, during the War of Independence, is recalled. The great support provided by Charlie’s wife, Tess Morgan, daughter of an RIC officer, during his illness in later years is also recalled. The split between the brothers, Charlie and Emmet Dalton is explained. Emmet’s plan to buy Ardmore Studios later in his life is also explored. Track 3: There follows a discussion on the shooting of Michael Collins at Béal na Bláth in August 1922. The fact that Carol Mullan’s father acted as pall-bearer at Collins’s funeral is recalled. His daughter mentions the great bond Charlie Dalton had with his fellow soldiers, and his role in the attempted jail-break of Seán McKeon from Mountjoy Jail is further mentioned. Track 4: Carol Mullan recalls her father’s character, maintaining that he was not the kind of person who would normally become involved in violence, but he had complete loyalty to Michael Collins, and was fired by love of his country and the cause of freedom. She also explains her own feelings of sadness and regret that no proper treatment for her father’s subsequent illness was available, and she pays tribute to her mother for her incredible courage and support of her husband. The new lease of life provided to Charlie Dalton by Joe McGrath at the Irish Hospital Sweepstakes, where Charlie had previously worked, is also recalled. The legacy of the Daltons is examined and discussed.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 4.57 MB, 7.97 MB, 5.86 MB, 12.03 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Mairéad de hÓir (b. 1927), Part 1 Mairéad de hÓir (b. 1927), Part 1
Interview location: North Circular Road, Limerick
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-025
Subject: Daly, Nora and de hÓir, Éamon (Interviewee’s parents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 43:21
Track 1: Mairéad de hÓir outlines the background of the Dore and the Daly families of Limerick, the meeting of her parents on the Limerick to Dublin train while making their way to participate in the 1916 Rising, and the harassment of the Daly family during the War of Independence. Growing up with stories of events during the 1916-1923 period is recalled. The orders received in Dublin by her mother Nora and her aunt Laura, to travel to Cork and Limerick during the Rising to meet with the Volunteers there, are described. Track 2: Mairéad discusses her father’s ill-health which had its origin in Frongoch Camp in Wales, where he was imprisoned after the Rising. She describes the Daly family bakery business in Limerick, set up by her granduncle, John Daly, and later run by her parents. Long conversations between Mairéad’s father and Éamon de Valera in the 1950s are recalled, as are the 1966 Commemorations when Telefís Éireann recorded her parents. Track 3: Each commemoration down through the years was attended by Éamon de hÓir and his wife, Nora. The wide division which was evident between republicans and Free State members at those events is described. The hurt carried by her mother, Nora Daly, following the execution of her brother, Edward Daly, and her brother-in-law, Thomas Clarke, after the Rising is also recalled. Track 4: The fact that the Daly bakery was always a meeting point for old comrades in later years is explained, as is her mother’s great antipathy towards the Blueshirts. The reasons for the refusal of the Volunteer pension by her parents and a story about the refusal of absolution to her father by the Catholic church in Limerick, prior to the Rising, is described. Track 5: Childhood memories of life spent over the Daly bakery in William St, Limerick, and later at Sarsfield Street, where the landmark building was painted in green, white and gold, are recounted.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 7.90 MB, 12.55 MB, 3.06 MB, 6.13 MB, 10.10 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Mairéad de hÓir (b. 1927), Part 2 Mairéad de hÓir (b. 1927), Part 2
Interview location: North Circular Road, Limerick
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-026
Subject: Daly, Nora and de hÓir, Éamon (Interviewee’s parents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 41:08
Track 1: Mairéad de hÓir describes the consequences of the harassment of her maternal Daly family by the Black and Tans, and she recalls her aunt, Madge Daly, the businesswoman of the family, who was very generous to her extended clan. Track 2: During her youth, the family home in North Circular Road in Limerick was visited by many of those involved in the Rising and its aftermath. Maireád recalls visits by Tom Barry, Frank Shouldice, Frank Burke and Éamon Martin. Track 3: The treatment by the people of Limerick of the Daly family after the Rising and during the Civil War is described, and the sale of the landmark bakery building in Sarsfield Street in 1972 is recalled. Track 4: Contains a discussion on the Dore family of Glin, Co. Limerick, and an anecdote relating to the Knight of Glin is recounted. Track 5: Mairéad recalls visits by the artist Seán Ó Súilleabháin to the Daly home in Limerick to paint portraits of her mother and her aunt, Madge.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 13.30 MB, 7.70 MB, 6.71 MB, 3.97 MB, 5.93 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Mary Dawson (b. 1926) Mary Dawson (b. 1926)
Interview location: Skerries, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-027
Subject: Davis, Brigid (Interviewee’s mother)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 71:03
Track 1: Mary Dawson describes her mother’s Davis family background. Brigid Davis was a nurse who worked with Dr. Kathleen Lynn, a member of the Irish Citizen Army and their Chief Medical Officer during the 1916 Rising. Dr. Lynn founded St. Ultan’s Hospital for Infants in Dublin in 1919. (The Irish Citizen Army was founded by James Connolly and James Larkin during the Dublin Lockout of 1913, to protect workers from attacks by the Dublin Metropolitan Police.) Brigid Davis’s early involvement in the Lockout in 1913 and her subsequent involvement in the Rising are examined. Her friendship with socialist and Citizen Army member, Rosie Hackett, is also described. Track 2: The background to the Davis family in Portrane, Co. Dublin, is explored and Mary Dawson’s grandparents, schoolteachers in St. Margaret’s, who later made their home in a building opposite the Four Courts in Dublin, are recalled. The meeting of Brigid Davis and her future husband, Patrick Duffy, who fought under the command of Michael Mallin in 1916, is described. Brigid Davis witnessed the shooting of Seán Connolly, Commander of the City Hall garrison in 1916, and this event is discussed. Track 3: Rosie Hackett is fondly remembered as a small woman who ran a tobacconist shop attached to Liberty Hall. The character and religious beliefs of Brigid Davis are described by her daughter, who was told that the Citizen Army were very well prepared by James Connolly, and by the women, with medical equipment and supplies. Her mother’s clear recollection of the night she spent in Liberty Hall, prior to the start of the Rising, is described. Track 4: Provides a description of the prevailing mood in Dublin following the Rising. Brigid Davis’s disillusionment about the events of the Civil War is described, as is her husband’s army captaincy while he was stationed at the Curragh. Track 5: The great conversations about old times enjoyed by Brigid Davis and Rosie Hackett later in their lives are described. Brigid Davis took part in just one 1916 commemoration, in 1942, when she marched proudly with her green and gold band in an event clearly recalled by her daughter. Also recalled is the fact that Brigid Davis occupied the cell below P. H. Pearse and others in Kilmainham Jail following the Rising, and the effect of this experience on her later life is explained. Track 6: Mary Dawson recalls her father, Patrick Duffy, and his working life. Track 7: Dr. Kathleen Lynn’s personality and her close friendship with Brigid Davis is discussed. Mary Dawson’s meeting with Nurse Elizabeth O’Farrell, who came to visit Brigid Davis at her home in later years, is recalled.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.46 MB, 10.69 MB, 12.27 MB, 4.34 MB, 9.41 MB, 9.64 MB, 12.31 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Liam Deasy (b. 1937) Liam Deasy (b. 1937)
Interview location: Bandon, Co. Cork
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-028
Subject: Deasy, Liam (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 59:30
Track 1: The Deasy family background in Kilmacsimon Quay near Bandon is discussed. Liam Deasy’s grandfather, Liam Deasy, who served in the Royal Navy and was demobbed in 1902, subsequently serving with the Royal Navy Reserve, is recalled. The interviewee’s father, Jim Deasy, and his uncle, Liam Deasy, both worked as draper’s clerks in Bandon. The brothers joined the Gaelic League and the GAA, and enrolled in the Irish Volunteers in 1917. Track 2: The organisational skills of the interviewee’s uncle, Liam Deasy, in building up the West Cork Brigades are discussed, as is the fact that he did not get recognition for this. The unveiling of the monument to Michael Collins at Sam’s Cross in the 1970s, and the attendance on the platform on that occasion of Liam Deasy and Tom Barry, is described. Mention is made of Liam Deasy’s brothers, Jack and Pat. Jack escaped from his imprisonment at Spike Island by swimming to Cobh, and Pat was killed at the Kilmichael Ambush, at the age of 16, in November 1920. The differing views of Liam Deasy and Éamon de Valera, and their meeting at Sweeney’s house the night before the shooting of Michael Collins in August 1922, is discussed. Track 3: Contains a discussion on the reasons why Liam Deasy supported the republican side, and also a discussion on why the interviewee feels that Michael Collins was “railroaded” into his position in the Free State Army. He also mentions the fact that his uncle, Liam Deasy, revealed to him the identity of the person he felt was responsible for the killing of Collins at Béal na Bláth. The interviewee describes being present during the recording of audio tapes, compiled by Fr. John Chisolm with members of the West Cork IRA. Track 4: The reasons why Liam Deasy agreed to the surrender towards the end of the Civil War are discussed in detail, as is the huge effect of this on the Deasy family in the following years. Tracks 5-6: Liam Deasy’s book Towards Ireland Free is discussed, along with the audio recordings compiled by Fr. Chisolm with West Cork IRA personnel, Ned Young, Tommy Kelleher, Jack O’Sullivan and Paddy O’Brien. The interviewee provides his views on the content of these recordings.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 10.88 MB, 8.34 MB, 5.45 MB, 9.91 MB, 6.86 MB, 13.09 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Grattan de Courcy-Wheeler Grattan de Courcy-Wheeler
Interview location: Carbury, Co. Kildare
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-029
Subject: de Courcy-Wheeler, Captain Henry (Interviewee’s granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 53:17
Track 1: Grattan de Courcy-Wheeler describes the Grattan family background and his family connection to Drummin House and estate in Co. Kildare. Track 2: The Irish patriot, Henry Grattan, is recalled by Grattan de Courcy-Wheeler who is a great admirer. He discusses his grandfather, Dr. Robert de Courcy-Wheeler, known as ‘Diamond’ to his friends, who had a medical practice at Monkstown, Co. Dublin, and who owned Drummin House. Track 3: Cecil de Courcy-Wheeler, Grattan’s father, is described, as is Grattan’s own education. Track 4: Grattan’s grandfather, Robert, was Chief Medical Officer with the British Army at Malta during WWI. His granduncle, Henry de Courcy-Wheeler, was appointed Staff Officer to General Officer in Command W. H. M. Lowe, a position he held during the 1916 Rising in Dublin. Countess Markievicz was Henry’s wife’s distant kinswoman, and Henry took her surrender after the Rising. During the War of Independence, Drummin House was billeted by republican forces. Track 5: Grattan de Courcy-Wheeler discusses the actions taken by his granduncle, Captain Henry de Courcy-Wheeler, during and after the 1916 Rising. Also discussed is the caretaking of Drummin House which was left to his grandmother, Mabel, in later years when her husband had his practice in Monkstown, Co. Dublin. Track 6: Contains a description of the disappointment of the de Courcy-Wheeler family at their effective exclusion from honorary positions of trust in the administration of the country, following the signing of the Treaty. Prior to the setting up of Bord na Móna, Henry de Courcy-Wheeler was very involved in promoting the extraction of peat and, in this context, came to know Éamon de Valera very well. Grattan discusses this, and also the surrender of P. H. Pearse after the 1916 Rising. He also gives his views on the Economic War of the 1930s.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 19.74 MB, 4.61 MB, 5.75 MB, 4.35 MB, 4.43 MB, 9.97 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Dorothea Findlater (b.1909), Part 1 Dorothea Findlater (b.1909), Part 1
Interview location: Foxrock, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-030
Subject: de Courcy-Wheeler, Captain Henry (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 60:00
Track 1: Dorothea Findlater is the daughter of Captain Henry de Courcy-Wheeler, Staff Officer to General Officer Commanding W. H. M. Lowe, commander of the British forces in Dublin at Easter 1916. Also heard in the recording are her cousin, Grattan de Courcy Wheeler, and her son, Alex Findlater. She describes early memories of Robertstown House in Kildare, and from 1914, memories of life at the Curragh, recalling pastimes such as hockey and tennis, and the air force base located there. Track 2: Dorothea Findlater speaks of the surrender of P. H. Pearse, who was accompanied by Nurse O’Farrell, to General Lowe and her father, Henry de Courcy-Wheeler. Her father, accompanied by Nurse O’Farrell, also took the surrender from other republican leaders in Dublin. Dorothea recalls climbing to the top of the water tower at the Curragh with her mother and nanny, and witnessing the flames glowing from Dublin city during the Rising. Artefacts relating to the Rising in Dublin, kept in the de Courcy-Wheeler home for many years, are described. Track 3: Contains a description of Dorothea Findlater’s education at the Curragh, memories of the Civil War while living at Robertstown House, the prevailing tension, the threats received and the standoff. A raid on the house by the Free State Army while pursuing republicans on the run is also mentioned. Track 4: Dorothea speaks about the maternal side of the family, the pursuits enjoyed by her parents and grandparents, the sale of Robertstown House and the move to Foxrock. Track 5: The early years of the Free State are discussed and the setting up of Bord na Móna. She describes her father’s character, the domestic staff at Robertstown House, and her memories of military funerals at the Curragh. Track 6: Dorothea’s meetings with several Governors of Northern Ireland, through her involvement with the Empire Theatre of Varieties in Belfast, are recalled. Track 7: The Land Commission and ground rents in Co. Kildare are discussed. Track 8: Contains a discussion on WWII and memories of aircraft landing at Leopardstown from which Dorothea brought documents to the British embassy in Dublin. The burning in 1923 of Palmerstown House, the home of the Earl of Mayo, is recalled. Track 9: Details memories of Dorothea’s days at Trinity College and playing on the Irish hockey team.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 16.36 MB, 12.53 MB, 13.45 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Dorothea Findlater (b. 1909), Part 2 Dorothea Findlater (b. 1909), Part 2
Interview location: Curragh Camp, Co. Kildare
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-031
Subject: de Courcy-Wheeler, Captain Henry (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 46:14
Track 1: Recorded is the welcome afforded Dorothea Findlater by Col. Tom Aherne of the Irish Defence Forces, to Curragh Camp on her visit there to her childhood home where her father, Captain Henry de Courcy-Wheeler, was based with the British Army. At the Military Museum, she recalls the journey from their home at Robertstown House in Co. Kildare to the Army Service Corps Barracks at the Curragh at the outbreak of WWI. She also identifies areas at the Camp which were the sites of the tennis courts and the Royal Air Force landing strip in those days. Commandant Mick Moore, Development Officer at the Military Museum, comments on various aspects of Dorothea’s recollections of places, including the stables, the gardens, the bakery and the Barracks, known since 1928 as Clarke House. The funerals of the casualties of WWI, and the hospital on the site, are also recalled. Track 2: Moving to another section of the Museum which exhibits artifacts from the 1916-1923 period, Dorothea recalls her father’s meetings with Michael Collins and with Éamon de Valera, and describes her memories of living again at Robertstown House during the War of Independence, and the stand-off between her father and the IRA at the house at that time. The families who worked for her father at Robertstown House, her education by the local Rector and the popular mode of transport of the time, are also recalled. Track 3: Sergeant Michael Bookle of the Cavalry Unit at Curragh Camp explains the history of the Slievenamon, the armoured car on display, which was driven the short distance to Clarke House for the occasion. In her first return visit to Clarke House, formerly the residence of her family at the Curragh, Dorothea Findlater discusses the furnishings, the fittings, the usage of various rooms, the calling bells in each room, her father’s batman, the visiting governess, the nurse and the other staff from her childhood days.
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Number of files: 9
File size(s): 5.98 MB, 6.83 MB, 8.70 MB, 4.17 MB, 5.13 MB, 4.40 MB, 2.73 MB, 6.86 MB, 8.06 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Pádraigín Ní Dhubhluachra (b. 1945) Pádraigín Ní Dhubhluachra (b. 1945)
Interview location: Kilkenny City
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-032
Subject: de Loughry, Peter (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 56:07
Track 1: The Fenian background of the de Loughry family in Kilkenny city, and their public service, is described by Pádraigín Ní Dhubhluachra, who explains that her father, Richard de Loughry, served as an apprentice with McKenna’s hardware store in Listowel, Co. Kerry. Also explained is the fact that her grandfather, Peter de Loughry, died before statements to the Bureau of Military History had been taken. The preparedness of the Irish Volunteers in Kilkenny, prior to the Countermanding Order by Eoin MacNeill, is discussed, as is the arrest of Peter de Loughry following the Rising, and his internment in English prisons with his brother Larry. Track 2: The further arrest of her grandfather in 1918, following the “German Plot”, and his imprisonment in Lincoln Jail, is recalled by Pádraigín, and she displays and discusses his autograph book which contains inscriptions and illustrations by many of the inmates of Lincoln Jail. The family’s negative feelings towards Éamon de Valera are also recalled. Track 3: The key which was cut by Peter de Loughry in Lincoln Jail for use in the escape of Éamon de Valera, Seán Milroy and Seán McGarry in February 1919 is discussed, as is de Valera’s subsequent trip to America to maximise the propaganda to be gained from this escape. Track 4: Peter de Loughry’s experiences during the War of Independence, and his treatment by the Black and Tans, as described in his diaries, are discussed. Mayoman Ernie O’Malley, organiser of Volunteers, was arrested in Kilkenny during the War of Independence. The discovery on his person of a list of Kilkenny Volunteers is recalled. (O’Malley was an officer in the Irish Volunteers, and by 1921 was Divisional Commander of the Second Southern Division.) Pádraigín describes the character of her paternal grandmother, and her leadership of the members of Cumann na mBan in Kilkenny. Tracks 5-6: Contains an account of the stress endured by Pádraigín’s grandmother, Winifred, due to the memories evoked by the 1966 Commemorations, and her subsequent death. Her husband, Peter de Loughry, who was elected Cumann na nGaedheal TD for Carlow/Kilkenny in 1927, had died in 1931. The pensions accepted and refused by his widow are discussed.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 11.38 MB, 6.58 MB, 5.82 MB, 5.77 MB, 12.46 MB, 9.44 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Tom Derham (b. 1926) Tom Derham (b. 1926)
Interview location: Skerries, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-033
Subject: Derham, Joseph (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 45:32
Track 1: This interview commences with a brief synopsis of the background to Joseph Derham’s involvement in the 1916 Rising in Dublin. Track 2: Featured are memories of Tom Derham’s parents and their families, his uncle Matt Derham’s involvement in the 1916-1923 period, and the involvement of his aunt, Kathleen (Toddy) Derham, whose cottage in Skerries was used to store some of the arms from the Howth gun-running of July 1914. Track 3: Contains Joseph Derham’s description of the week of the Rising as he told it to his son, Tom. Joseph Derham was the `timekeeper’ in the GPO and attempted to quench the fires there. He was under the command of Joseph Plunkett and was sent to the GPO by Seán T. O’Kelly. An anecdote involving Michael Collins and Joseph Derham while imprisoned in Frongoch Camp in North Wales is told. (Michael Collins was aide de camp to Joseph Plunkett in the GPO during the Rising.) Track 4: Mention is made of drawings by Tom Murphy, given to Joseph Derham while in Frongoch Camp, which are now in Kilmainham Jail. Track 5: Joseph Derham’s life after the Rising is described as is his meeting with Michael Collins shortly before the latter’s death in 1922. Track 6: Tom Derham describes the initial meeting of his mother, Annie Fitzmaurice and his father, Joseph Derham, when she brought supplies to Frongoch Camp for the prisoners there. Track 7: Featured is the recitation of a poem penned by Tom Derham about his father. Tom’s own views on the men who took part in the Rising are described. Track 8: Tom Derham’s schooldays and education are featured. Track 9: A casualty of the first day of the Civil War is recalled and the reasons why Joseph Derham did not take the Free State side during the Civil War are explained.
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Number of files: 9
File size(s): 3.21 MB, 5.65 MB, 8.63 MB, 3.23 MB, 4.52 MB, 5.62 MB, 4.23 MB 4.82 MB 1.87 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Éamon Ó Cuiv (b. 1950), Part 1 Éamon Ó Cuiv (b. 1950), Part 1
Interview location: Kildare Street, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-034
Subject: de Valera, Éamon and de Valera, Sinéad (Interviewee’s grandparents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 62:54
Track 1: Éamon Ó Cuiv describes his early memories of his grandfather, his character and personality, and his own questioning as a child, of his grandmother Sinéad de Valera (née Flanagan), about the Rising. He describes his grandmother as a very strong-willed person who was committed to nationalism. Track 2: Contains Éamon de Valera’s own description of events in Boland’s Mills during the Rising as he recounted them to his grandson. Track 3: The First Dáil and its functions and successes are discussed. The sending of a delegation to Versailles and the signing of the Oath of Allegiance are also discussed. Track 4: A discussion follows on the arrest of his grandfather, the death sentence imposed on him and his later reprieve. The admiration felt by Éamon Ó Cuiv’s grandparents for Roger Casement, and the trip to America made by his grandfather during the War of Independence are discussed. (Roger Casement was the last of the 1916 leaders to be executed, in August 1916.) Track 5: The election of Éamon de Valera in East Clare in 1917, to a seat he was to hold until 1959, and his grandfather’s pride in his association with this constituency due to its connection to Daniel O’Connell, are recalled. An explanation follows of the 1918 “German Plot” and the subsequent arrest and imprisonment of his grandfather in Lincoln Jail. His escape from Lincoln Jail and his later delight in describing this escape to his grandchildren is recorded. His return visit to Lincoln Jail in 1951 is also mentioned. Track 6: Details about the negotiations in London in December 1921, the reasons why Éamon de Valera did not attend, and the signing of the Treaty, are discussed. The fact that the delegates were not arrested on their return to Dublin is also explored. Track 7: The friendship which existed between Éamon de Valera and Frank Aiken, and the shooting of Michael Collins, are recalled. Mention is made of Peter Golden, who played his part in attempting to negotiate peace during the Civil War, and the friendship which later existed between some members of the Collins family and Éamon and Sinéad de Valera. Tracks 8-9: The difficult years for Sinn Féin after 1923 are discussed and comparisons are made between the fortunes of Fianna Fáil today and of those earlier days. The birth of the Irish Press and Éamon de Valera’s intentions for the newspaper are explained.
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Number of files: 9
File size(s): 7.47 MB, 6.07 MB, 3.73 MB, 6.17 MB, 2.04 MB, 5.78 MB, 12.19 MB, 8.63 MB, 5.60 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Éamon Ó Cuiv (b. 1950) Éamon Ó Cuiv (b. 1950)
Interview location: Kildare Street, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-035
Subject: de Valera, Éamon (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 36:04 Part 2
Track 1: Éamon Ó Cuiv explains that his grandfather, Éamon de Valera, never encouraged him to enter politics, and similarly, that he personally never traded on his famous political name. Track 2: The 1942 executions while Fianna Fáil was in power are discussed. Éamon de Valera’s famous speech of May 1945 in response to that of Winston Churchill at the close of WWII, which he himself composed, is recalled. Éamon Ó Cuiv gives his interpretation of the various elements of this speech. Track 3: The seventeen years during which Éamon de Valera served as Taoiseach are described, and his grandson gives his views on this period. Track 4: A summary of the achievements of his grandfather, and the reasons why he is very proud of those achievements, are explained by Éamon Ó Cuiv. He maintains that the deep wounds inflicted by the Civil War no longer remain today.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 8.46 MB, 11.54 MB, 7.02 MB, 6.05 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Garrett FitzGerald (b. 1926) Garrett FitzGerald (b. 1926)
Interview location: Sandyford, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-036
Subject: FitzGerald, Desmond (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2008
Length: 55:39
Track 1: Desmond FitzGerald’s family background in London and family visits to West Kerry are recalled. Track 2: Garrett FitzGerald’s mother, Mabel McConnell, was a Northern Unionist, he explains, who became involved with the suffragette movement when she lived in London in 1909. Mabel was also involved with the central branch of the Gaelic League, where she met her future husband, Desmond FitzGerald. In 1913, the couple rented Ballintaggart House in Dingle, Co. Kerry, where they met The O’Rahilly, who invited Desmond to join the IRB. Two years later the FitzGeralds moved to Bray, Co. Wicklow, and later Desmond FitzGerald established the Irish Volunteers in West Kerry. Track 3: Garrett Fitzgerald explains that just before the Rising, The O’Rahilly sent Desmond FitzGerald to meet Eoin MacNeill in an attempt to have the MacNeill’s Countermanding Order countermanded. During Easter Week, Garrett’s father’s role in the GPO was to take charge of food supplies. Garrett recounts a story told to him by his father about his return home directly after the Rising. He was arrested at his home and transported to Frongoch Camp in North Wales. His release and further arrest in later years, as a result of the “German Plot”, is described. Track 4: Desmond FitzGerald’s inclusion as a public relations officer with the Irish Delegation to London prior to the Treaty, is described, as is his wife’s strong opposition to the signing of the Treaty. Garrett FitzGerald explains that he was “a child of reconciliation” between his parents in 1926. Track 5: Desmond FitzGerald’s position in politics during the years from 1919 to 1938 is described, as is his work at the League of Nations, and his title of Senior Minister of the Crown in the Commonwealth in 1930 – a title which amused him greatly, says his son. The impact on Desmond FitzGerald of the shooting of Kevin O’Higgins in 1927 is explored, as is Garrett’s memory of his attendance, with his mother, at the 1941 commemorations of 1916 in the GPO. The Curragh Mutiny, and Desmond FitzGerald’s strong views on this event are also described, as is his disappointment at the refusal of Éamon de Valera to be part of the Irish Delegation to the Treaty negotiations in 1921. Tracks 6-7: Contains Garrett FitzGerald’s recollection of his father’s security detail in Bray after the O’Higgins murder, and of his love of holidaying in South Kerry. An anecdotal account follows of the decision arrived at regarding Garrett’s training in law, and there is also a description of his early career in Aer Lingus.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 7.33 MB, 4.40 MB, 6.99 MB, 3.65 MB, 10.94 MB, 8.46 MB, 9.23 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Peter Gaffney (b. 1937) and Josephine ‘Babs’ Doyle (b. 1931) Peter Gaffney (b. 1937) and Josephine ‘Babs’ Doyle (b. 1931)
Interview location: Lusk, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-037
Subject: Gaffney, Peter and Devine, John (Interviewee’s father and Interviewee’s adoptive father respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 43:57
Track 1: Josephine Doyle discusses the early death of her mother, Alice Nolan, and her subsequent adoption by Johnny Devine and his wife, Josie, who lived in Lusk, Co. Dublin. She also explains that Johnny Devine fought in the battle of Ashbourne and had been a member of Tomás Ashe’s pipe band, along with his brother, Frank Devine. Peter Gaffney, whose family came from Balruddery, Co. Dublin, discusses his father, Peter Gaffney’s activities during the period 1919-1923, particularly his involvement with the local Flying Column during the War of Independence. He also discusses the Battle of Ashbourne, and he explains the reasons why his father was not involved in that conflict. Track 2: The splits which occurred in many local families following the signing of the Treaty are recalled by Peter Gaffney, and Josephine Devine displays and discusses a photograph taken at Frongoch Camp in North Wales after the Rising, which includes Johnny Devine and other local men. She also recalls Johnny’s mother’s premonition about the return home of her son, Johnny, who was imprisoned in Frongoch Camp. Track 3: Letters written by Johnny during his imprisonment in Frongoch Camp are described by Josephine Doyle, and she and Peter Gaffney recall the setting up of the Fingal Old IRA Men’s Welfare Society in later years. The musical legacy of Tomás Ashe and the musicians of The Black Raven Pipe Band are described. The visit of Éamon de Valera to Lusk, during the 1966 Commemorations, is recalled. Track 4: Peter Gaffney discusses his own involvement in raising funding for the Fingal Old IRA Men’s Welfare Society, as also did Johnny Devine, and the local families’ adoption of opposite stances during the Civil War. The work of his father, Peter, in training and breaking horses for farmers is recalled by Peter Gaffney, and Josephine Doyle describes her father Johnny Devine’s working life with Dublin Co. Council.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 7.29 MB, 8.63 MB, 12.51 MB, 11.85 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Ann Gallagher (b. 1933) Ann Gallagher (b. 1933)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-038
Subject: Gallagher, Frank (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 50:07
Track 1: Frank Gallagher’s early life in Cork City as a member of a large family, and as a journalist with the Cork Free Press, is described. Ann Gallagher details the period in Cork City before the Rising in 1916, explaining that her father moved to Dublin in 1917 where he met Erskine Childers and Éamon de Valera and became involved with the Irish Bulletin. Her mother also became involved with the Bulletin which was first produced in November 1919. Frank Gallagher’s War of Independence book, Days of Fear, and its production, is also described. Track 2: Ann Gallagher explains that she and her sister were adopted by Frank and Cecilia Gallagher, and she recalls her father’s disciplined and organised personality and his attendance at Mass daily. She also conveys the views held by her father on the signing of the Treaty. Track 3: Frank Gallagher was involved with Éamon de Valera in setting up The Irish Press newspaper in 1931. He was subsequently appointed Deputy Director of Radio Éireann in 1936, and in 1939, Director of the Government Information Bureau. These appointments are discussed by his daughter, who also recalls her father’s visit to America in 1939 to meet President Roosevelt to discuss Ireland’s neutrality. Track 4: Ann Gallagher recounts an anecdote relating to her father’s time with the Irish Bulletin. She also explains the final destination of her father’s papers and military medals. She further recalls the story of her uncle, Jim Gallagher, who was killed by friendly fire during the War of Independence. Her views on her father’s legacy are provided, as is a description of his prolific writings. She reads from an original letter to Frank and Cecilia Gallagher, written by Frank’s great friend, Erskine Childers, on the eve of the latter’s execution in 1922. (Erskine Childers was Secretary to the Irish Delegation at the Treaty negotiations, and Frank Gallagher’s book, Days of Fear, was dedicated to him.)
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 8.91 MB, 9.02 MB, 8.29 MB, 19.68 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth (b. 1950), Part 1 Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth (b. 1950), Part 1
Interview location: Yorkshire, England.
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-039
Subject: Gore-Booth, Constance – Countess Markievicz (Interviewee’s great-aunt)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 44:07
Track 1: Details of the 400 years of life at Lissadell, as lived by the Gore-Booth family, are set out. Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth’s first visit to Lissadell House in Co. Sligo, at the age of 17, is described. Track 2: Sir Josslyn describes his first meeting with his father at Lissadell. He also reflects on being Anglo-Irish and what this means to him. Track 3: Sir Josslyn’s grandfather, who was similarly named, is described. He was a reforming landlord who felt a strong obligation to his tenants. Track 4: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth provides his views on Constance Gore-Booth’s republican beliefs and revolutionary ideals. Her sister Eva’s involvement in the suffragette movement in England, and its effects on the family, are mentioned. Track 5: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth speaks about the arrest of Countess Markievicz following the surrender in 1916, and her correspondence of that time, which he later discovered at Lissadell. Track 6: Sir Josslyn’s views on the Countess’s involvement in the Rising are explained, together with the effect of this involvement on him personally. (Countess Markievicz was second in command to Michael Mallin at St. Stephen’s Green and in the College of Surgeons. She was initially sentenced to death.) Track 7: The Gore-Booth papers connected to the Countess, and Sir Josslyn’s deposit of those with the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland in Belfast are discussed. A set of handcuffs, probably given to the Countess following one of her arrests and retained by Sir Josslyn, are also mentioned. The reasons why the Countess chose not to return to Lissadell House during her lifetime are also explored.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.61 MB, 8.66 MB, 5.01 MB, 6.88 MB, 4.38 MB, 4.18 MB, 4.73 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth (b. 1950), Part 2 Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth (b. 1950), Part 2
Interview location: Yorkshire, England.
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-040
Subject: Gore-Booth, Constance – Countess Markievicz (Interviewee’s great-aunt)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 52:13
Track 1: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth recounts the background to the sale of Lissadell House in Co. Sligo, and the great responsibility which fell to him in making the decision to sell the property in 2003. Some historical family heirlooms which he decided not to sell with the property are mentioned. Track 2: Constance Gore-Booth’s relationship with her father during her youth at Lissadell, and her involvement with the local people, are discussed. Track 3: The Gore-Booth family connections with the British diplomatic service and Sir Josslyn’s involvement with charitable organisations are described. Track 4: Sir Josslyn’s strong attachment to Ireland and his ancestral roots are discussed. A clarification is provided of an inaccurate account relating to a ship which sank en route to Canada, having been funded by the Gore-Booth family during the Famine.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 22.62 MB, 12.91 MB, 2.82 MB, 9.50 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Fr. Éanna Henderson (b. 1925), Part 1 Fr. Éanna Henderson (b. 1925), Part 1
Interview location: Roscrea, Co. Tipperary
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-041
Subject: Henderson, Frank (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 68:14
Track 1: Explains the Fenian background of the Henderson family and of Fr. Éanna Henderson’s maternal Brennan family – his mother was involved in 1916. Track 2: The period from the Lockout in 1913 to the Rising in 1916 is discussed. Fr. Éanna explains that his father told him that James Connolly was the person involved in the Rising whom he most admired. Mention is made of Dick McKee who was also involved in the Rising and who remained friendly with Frank Henderson. McKee was killed during the War of Independence. Track 3: Frank Henderson’s home in Sherrard St., Dublin, is described, together with the use of the house as a centre for republican planning. Track 4: Fr. Éanna recalls the visit to Mount Saint Joseph Cistercian Monastery in Roscrea of Nurse Elizabeth O’Farrell, and their discussion of the iconic photograph taken at the surrender of P. H. Pearse after the 1916 Rising. There follows an account of his father Frank Henderson’s time in the GPO during the Rising, of his mother’s visit there with food supplies, and the great responsibility Fr. Éanna has always felt about keeping the details of that time clear in his mind. Track 5: The surrender at the end of the Rising and its aftermath are described in detail, including the march up Henry Street and the night outside the Rotunda. Track 6: Fr. Éanna Henderson recalls his grandmother’s family from Armagh, and their connection to the Manchester Martyrs. He discusses his father’s support of de Valera, and his uncle Leo Henderson’s involvement in the Civil War. Tracks 7-8: Fr. Éanna shares his views on his father’s involvement in the 1916 Rising, his own opinions on Michael Collins, and memories of the testimony provided by Frank Henderson to Ernie O’Malley. He explains his own decision to deposit his and his family’s collection of historical memorabilia and papers in the Kilmainham Jail Archives.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 4.05 MB, 8.49 MB, 6.38 MB, 10.75 MB, 5.90 MB, 7.69 MB, 8.40 MB 10.88 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Fr. Éanna Henderson (b. 1925), Part 2 Fr. Éanna Henderson (b. 1925), Part 2
Interview location: Roscrea, Co. Tipperary
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-042
Subject: Henderson, Frank (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 24:15
Track 1: Fr. Éanna Henderson recalls childhood memories of the Eucharistic Congress in 1932 in Dublin. He speaks of his memories of the funeral of P. H. Pearse’s mother, his visit to Kilmainham Jail in the 1930s, and the commemorations of 1916 which he attended. Track 2: Fr. Éanna’s uncle, Leo Henderson, is recalled as is a detailed discussion they once had about the shooting of Seán Treacy (a prominent IRA member from Tipperary who was shot dead in Dublin in October 1920). Tracks 3-4: A discussion follows on Dick McKee’s violent death in Dublin Castle, details of which were told to Fr. Éanna by Dick McKee’s sister. He summarises his views of the Civil War and its aftermath.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 5.45 MB, 6.07 MB, 7.50 MB, 3.22 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: John Heuston (b. 1951) John Heuston (b. 1951)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-043
Subject: Heuston, Seán (Interviewee’s relative)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 45:20
Track 1: The Heuston family from Ardfinnan in Co. Tipperary is discussed; their trade as weavers, and their Fenian background, are also outlined. John Heuston explains that his grandfather emigrated to New York in 1898, joining the United States Army. Track 2: Seán Heuston was born in Gloucester Street in north inner city Dublin in 1891. John Heuston explains that his information on the Heuston family came from Seán’s brother, Michael Heuston, who was a Dominican priest. Having gained prior permission from his religious superiors, Michael Heuston went to Kilmainham Jail, at the request of his brother Seán, on the eve of his execution following the 1916 Rising. John Heuston explains that Seán Heuston’s grandfather joined the British Army in the years following the Famine. Track 3: Contains an explanation of the family circumstances of Seán Heuston – he had two sisters, Mary, who became a Dominican nun, and Teresa, who lived on in the family home in Fontenoy Street, off Dorset Street, Dublin. She held all the Heuston family papers until, in later years, she gave them to her neighbour, Mrs. Gilchrist, who later had them deposited in Kilmainham Jail. Track 4: The Heuston name and its meaning to him is described by John Heuston, who also mentions that Seán Heuston was one of the youngest participants in the Rising to be executed. A discussion follows on the naming of Heuston Railway Station in Dublin, and on a piece of furniture with connections to the patriot.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 11.01 MB, 16.53 MB, 5.43 MB, 8.58 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Camilla Mitchell Camilla Mitchell
Interview location: Castleconnell, Co. Limerick
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-044
Subject: Hobson, Bulmer (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 59:22
Track 1: Camilla Mitchell describes her early memories of her father, Bulmer Hobson, and of life at the family home in Rathfarnham in Dublin. This track also includes comments by Camilla’s husband, John Mitchell, including mention of the fact that Bulmer Hobson was on the British “wanted” list, and was regarded as the most dangerous man in Ireland in the period prior to the 1916 Rising. Track 2: Camilla’s mother, Claire Regan from Carlow, is recalled, and her parents’ complex relationship, separation and divorce is discussed. Her own bond with her father was close, she explains. Track 3: The background of the Hobson family of Belfast is depicted. The turbulence which existed within the family due to Bulmer’s republican idealism and actions is discussed. The visitors to their home in Castleconnell, where Bulmer Hobson resided in his later years, included Denis McCullough, James Delargy and Jack O’Leary. They are recalled by John Mitchell, who explains that he assisted Bulmer Hobson to write his autobiography. Track 4: The comparative ostracisation of her father by some sections of the public during the years following the Rising, and its effect on him, are recalled by Camilla Mitchell. Track 5: Bulmer Hobson’s antipathy towards Éamon de Valera, and the absence of any mention of Michael Collins by Hobson, are explored. Track 6: Bulmer Hobson’s feelings of neutrality during the Civil War are recalled, as is an occasion in 1966 when Radio Telefís Éireann recorded him on his memories of the period of the Rising. This recording forms part of this Irish Life and Lore 1916 Rising Collection. John Mitchell recalls his father-in-law’s reaction to the executions during the Civil War. Track 7: The personality and character of Bulmer Hobson is recalled by his daughter, Camilla, who states that he was a pacifist, lacking in aggression, and a great organiser. The meeting and marriage of her parents is also discussed. Track 8: Contains details of the funeral of Bulmer Hobson in Roundstone in Co. Wicklow, and the attendance at this event. Track 9: John Mitchell recounts an anecdote told to him in Philadelphia relating to a motor car occupied by Bulmer Hobson and Pat McCartan. Camilla Mitchell describes an extraordinary link to history through her paternal Belfast grandmother, who would relate stories told to her by her own grandmother about the fear engendered locally by the threat of invasion by Napoleon’s army.
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Number of files: 9
File size(s): 5.13 MB, 4.37 MB, 9.14 MB, 5.72 MB, 3.89 MB, 8.41 MB, 6.57 MB 6.10 MB 5.10 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Bulmer Hobson (b. 1883) Bulmer Hobson (b. 1883)
Interview location: Castleconnell, Co. Limerick
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-045
Subject: Hobson, Bulmer (recording courtesy of the Mitchell family)
Recorded by: RTÉ
Recording date: 1966
Length: 23:32
Track 1: Bulmer Hobson sets out the reasons why his interest in politics was sparked at an early age while attending school in Belfast, and his family’s response to his republican ideals. He recalls joining the Gaelic League where he met Denis McCullough, Peter Murphy and others. Track 2: Contains a discussion on Bulmer Hobson’s membership of the GAA in 1902 in Co. Antrim, and his setting up of a branch of Fianna Éireann (a republican youth movement founded in Dublin in 1909) before joining the IRB, the structure of which he set out to reorganise. He moved to Dublin in 1907 and edited the weekly newspaper, The Republic. His belief, prior to the Rising, that the insurrection was completely impractical, and his reasoning that passive resistance, or guerrilla warfare, would be preferable, are explained. He declares that nobody would listen to his arguments, and he goes on to discuss the setting up of the Ulster Volunteer Force in the North by Edward Carson, and the aftermath thereof. The period during which he edited The Irish Freedom publication, and his elevation to the Supreme Council of the IRB in 1911, are recalled. Also recalled is the occasion at the Rotunda Rink (Room 1) when approximately 3,000 people came to join the Irish Volunteers. Track 3: Some of the leaders of the Irish Volunteers are discussed, including Eoin MacNeill, whom he describes as being more than a figurehead; The O’Rahilly is described as being very active, though not taking a leading role; Seán MacDiarmada, who, because of his physical condition, did not play an active role; P. H. Pearse is described as a dreamer, sworn into the IRB by Bulmer Hobson (interviewee), who says that he was not a practical person and was not involved in building up the organisation. Bulmer Hobson explains that he left the Quaker religious movement as its beliefs did not coincide with his activities in the Irish Volunteers. Also explained is the misrepresentation in the press of the aftermath of the Howth gun-running in 1914, with regard to Mary Spring-Rice and Pádraig Cullen.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 6.60 MB, 7.32 MB, 7.66 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Brigid Hogan O’Higgins (b. 1932) Brigid Hogan O’Higgins (b. 1932)
Interview location: Loughrea, Co. Galway
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-046
Subject: Hogan, Patrick; Hogan, James and Hogan, Michael (Interviewee’s father and uncles respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 74:42
Track 1: Brigid Hogan O’Higgins explains the historical significance of her home, Kilrickle House in Loughrea, Co. Galway, which was partially burned during the Civil War. A description is given of her two uncles, James and Michael Hogan from the Clare Brigade, who had intended, before the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin MacNeill, to become involved in the 1916 Rising. Track 2: Brigid Hogan O’Higgins recalls that her father, Patrick (Paddy) Hogan, a solicitor who set up a practice in Loughrea, Co. Galway and who was elected TD for the First Dáil, was killed in a motor accident in 1936. She tells us that her mother, Mona Farrell, had been previously married to Michael Davitt, who died in 1927. He was the son of patriot Michael Davitt, agrarian agitator and founder member of the Land League. The round-up of agitators, including her father, Joe McGrath, Paddy McGilligan and Tom O’Higgins, by the British during the War of Independence is recalled, along with their imprisonment in Ballykinlar Camp in Co. Down. Track 3: Mention is made of the fact that Thomas MacDonagh (executed leader of 1916) taught Brigid Hogan O’Higgins’ mother, Mona Farrell, and her aunt Mary Hogan. The partial burning during the Civil War of Kilrickle House in Loughrea, owned by the Hogan family, is recalled. Brigid’s grandmother, her mother Mona and her five children, one of whom was Brigid’s step-brother Michael Davitt, lived at the house following her father’s death, and she recalls the fate of her father’s papers. Track 4: The pro-Treaty debates and her father’s role are discussed, as is his tenure in Government, including his time as Minister for Agriculture, his role in establishing the Sugar Company, in ACC Bank and in other establishments. The friendship which existed between Paddy Hogan, Kevin O’Higgins, Desmond FitzGerald and Michael Collins is recalled. The fact that Paddy Hogan was godfather to Maeve O’Higgins, daughter of Kevin O’Higgins, is revealed. The executions which took place during the Civil War, and other events of that fearful time, are discussed. Track 5: Mention is made of James Hogan, a first cousin of Brigid’s father, who was British Governor of Hong Kong. The deaths of Arthur Griffith and Michael Collins, and the consequences for the new Irish Government, are discussed. Nora Hogan, Brigid’s father’s sister, who was a missionary sister in China for many years, is recalled. Track 6: Provides a detailed description of the shooting of Kevin O’Higgins, and her father’s devastation as a result. The discovery of the identity of the killers and the consequences of this are explored. Track 7: At the age of 24, Brigid Hogan O’Higgins was elected Fine Gael TD for South Galway, and she describes her first day in the Dáil in 1957. A conversation with Dan Breen on that occasion is recalled, as are the high and low points of her career as a TD.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 7.77 MB, 7.58 MB, 12.78 MB, 5.55 MB, 9.00 MB, 7.02 MB, 18.78 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Helen Holland (b. 1925) Helen Holland (b. 1925)
Interview location: Chapelizod, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-047
Subject: Holland, Dan (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 54:31
Track 1: Helen Holland explains that her grandmother, Ellen Holland (née Cullen), was a recruiting agent and the “brains” behind much of the organisation which occurred prior to the 1916 Rising. Four of her sons were involved: Dan, Francis, Michael and Robert. The use of the Holland home for the making of grenades is discussed as is the fundraising trip to America made by her grandfather, Daniel Holland, before the Rising. Track 2: Helen’s upbringing at Inchicore in Dublin, and her father’s discharge from the Irish Army are recalled. Her father’s sudden death in the mid-1930s, and the family’s subsequent financial difficulties, are also recalled. Track 3: Helen’s grandmother, Ellen Holland, and her direction of operations in 1916 from her house in Inchicore, are described. Track 4: Sr. Philomena O’Daly, daughter of Paddy O’Daly, is present and she recalls Ellen Holland’s demeanour, her intelligence and her strength. (Paddy O’Daly was a member of Collins’s Squad and a prominent pro-Treaty figure.) Track 5: Helen Holland describes her early working life in Rowntree’s Factory and her later emigration to England. The strong bond which exists between the Holland and O’Daly families is emphasised, as is the memorabilia which survives from earlier times, and which is of great importance to both families. Track 6: Sr. Philomena O’Daly recalls a story relating to Dan Holland, who brought her brother, Paddy, into Mountjoy Jail to see their father during the War of Independence. She discusses her father’s escape from the prison and the visitors who would come to the O’Daly home in later years. Track 7: Helen Holland recounts her memories of her father, and recounts an anecdote relating to a car journey with her father and her siblings during her childhood in the 1930s. The Eucharistic Congress of 1932, and her family’s involvement therewith, are also recalled. Track 8: Helen discusses her own life in England following her emigration, and her feelings regarding the activities of her grandmother, father and uncles during the 1916-1923 period.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 9.37 MB, 9.81 MB, 2.52 MB, 4.21 MB, 4.81 MB, 3.69 MB, 9.03 MB, 6.59 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Richard Hurley (b. 1926) Richard Hurley (b. 1926)
Interview location: Loughshinny, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-048
Subject: Hurley, Patrick (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 46:49
Track 1: The Hurley family background in Drinagh, Co. Cork, and Patrick Hurley’s mother’s connections to the family of Michael Collins, are described. Patrick Hurley’s posting in 1922 to Balbriggan, Co. Dublin, as a member of the Free State Army is also discussed, as is his involvement in the attack on the Four Courts. Track 2: Richard Hurley describes events during the War of Independence in Balbriggan during which his mother, May Chute, and her two sisters, were terrorised by the Black and Tans. He also recounts stories of his father’s arrest of members of the local IRA during the Civil War. Track 3: The difficulties encountered by his father because of the arrests of the local IRA men, and the later healing of wounds due to his involvement with the Fingal Old IRA Men’s Welfare Society, are described. Track 4: The meeting of Richard Hurley’s parents, both of whom were members of the Gaelic League, is described, and his involvement in playing with The Pioneers GAA Club is also discussed. Tracks 5-6: 1916 Commemorations which Richard’s attended with his father, and his own involvement with work carried out on the 1916 memorial at Arbour Hill, prior to the 1966 Commemorations, are all described.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 7.45 MB, 5.99 MB, 4.54 MB, 5.30 MB, 7.53 MB, 12.09 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Jack Kelly (b. 1924) and Eileen Sweetman (b. 1937) Jack Kelly (b. 1924) and Eileen Sweetman (b. 1937)
Interview location: Rush, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-049
Subject: Kelly, Patrick (Interviewees’ father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 52:38
Track 1: Jack Kelly describes the Lusk, Co. Dublin, background to the Kelly family, who ran a grocery and bike shop in the village. Jack’s father, Pat Kelly, and his brothers, Joe and Mattie Kelly, were all involved in the Battle of Ashbourne in 1916. Jack describes the order given to his father, at the beginning of Easter Week, to travel into Dublin where he came under the command of Seán Heuston, at the Mendicity Institution. Track 2: Both Jack Kelly and Eileen Sweetman discuss Tomás Ashe’s pipe band in Lusk, The Black Raven Pipe Band, in which their father was a bagpiper. Memories of the War of Independence, and the brutal killing of Seán ‘Rover’ McCann by the Black and Tans, as told to Jack and Eileen by local women, are recounted. Track 3: Contains details of events following the signing of the Treaty, which resulted in the opening of a split in the Kelly family – Jack and Eileen’s uncle, Joseph Kelly, joined the Irish Free State Army and their father, Patrick, maintained his republican ideals. The family was later reconciled. The State pension, and Patrick Kelly’s involvement in identifying those who were entitled to it owing to their involvement in the Rising, are discussed. Track 4: The family business in Lusk in their younger days, together with their awareness and pride in their father’s involvement in Irish history, is discussed. Track 5: The legacy of Tomás Ashe, and the great respect accorded to his memory and to his legacy in the local area where he lived and worked, is explained. The Kelly family memorabilia is displayed and discussed, including an autograph book kept by Joseph Kelly while he was imprisoned in Frongoch Camp in North Wales in 1916, which includes illustrations and entries by many of those involved in the Rising.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 6.06 MB, 6.62 MB, 9.55 MB, 13.07 MB, 12.92 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Sheila Carden (b. 1934) Sheila Carden (b. 1934)
Interview location: Wicklow St., Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-050
Subject: Kelly, Tom (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 42:26
Track 1: Sheila Carden discusses her Kelly connections – her mother was Eileen Kelly, daughter of Alderman Tom Kelly, and she explains that it was while she was researching for her biography of her grandfather that she discovered his great involvement in the fight for Irish freedom. She also mentions his period of ill-health after his arrest and incarceration in Wormwood Scrubs Prison in 1919. Track 2: Tom Kelly’s nationalist views and his ambivalence towards plans for a Rising are discussed, as is his arrest at the end of the week of the Rising. Also discussed is his term as substitute Minister for Labour after Countess Markievicz’s arrest, subsequent to the Rising. Track 3: His reaction to the Treaty, his attempts to prevent the executions during the Civil War and the financial support provided by Michael Collins after Tom Kelly’s breakdown in prison in England in 1918, are all discussed. Also mentioned is his candidacy for election to the Dáil in 1933. Track 4: Sheila Carden describes her memories of her grandfather’s bookshop, his character and demeanour, and her own involvement in the creation of programmes for Telefís Éireann in 1966. Also discussed are other television programmes she worked on in earlier days at the station. Tracks 5-6: Contains an outline of the legacy of the work Alderman Tom Kelly undertook while an official of Dublin Corporation, which included his Chairmanship of the Housing Committee. He was also a major supporter of the Hugh Lane Gallery.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 6.62 MB, 10.05 MB, 1.81 MB, 5.26 MB, 12.22 MB, 2.95 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Raymond Keogh (b. 1947) Raymond Keogh (b. 1947)
Interview location: The National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-051
Subject: Keogh, Gerald (Interviewee’s step-granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 33:11
Track 1: The Fenian and United Irishman background to the Keogh family of Ranelagh, Dublin, is described, and family connections are discussed. Gerald Keogh was shot dead during the 1916 Rising. His brothers, Leo and Frank, acted as dispatch riders and another brother, Cyril, was in the GPO. Track 2: Contains a discussion on the circumstances surrounding the death of Gerald Keogh. The mission undertaken by Cyril Keogh to Philadelphia in 1918 is also discussed, and an explanation is given on the reasons why the Keogh home was under constant surveillance during the revolutionary period. Track 3: The research carried out by Raymond Keogh into his relative’s shooting outside Trinity College during the Rising, is discussed. Track 4: The involvement in the shooting of Gerald Keogh by Australian and New Zealand (ANZAC) soldiers is examined, as is their lack of profile in the narrative of the Rising. The wish of the Keogh family to have a plaque erected on the front façade of Trinity College in memory of Gerald Keogh is also mentioned, and reference is made to J. Augustus Keogh, a brother of Gerald Keogh, who was manager of the Abbey Theatre in 1916.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 8.66 MB, 10.53 MB, 6.71 MB, 4.53 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Liam Keogh (b. 1919) Liam Keogh (b. 1919)
Interview location: Walkinstown, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-052
Subject: Keogh, Ned (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 54:57
Track 1: Liam Keogh describes his family background, his father’s employment with the railways at Inchicore, his involvement in the 1913 Lockout, joining the Citizen Army in 1914 and his inclusion in the firing party over the grave of Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa in August, 1915. Track 2: Contains a description of events from the Saturday of Easter Week, when the Volunteers, including Ned Keogh, gathered at Liberty Hall; their march to St. Stephen’s Green under the command of Michael Mallin and their subsequent relocation to the College of Surgeons. Track 3: An excerpt is read from the testimony of Ned Keogh to the Bureau of Military History which illustrates his close friendship with Michael Mallin. Both men were members of a local pipe band. Liam Keogh recalls an election speech by Countess Markievicz, delivered from the back of a truck. Liam attended the Countess’s funeral procession in O’Connell Street on route to her burial at Glasnevin. Track 4: Describes memories of the Keogh family’s move from Dublin to the home of his mother’s people in Kilkenny while Ned Keogh was on the run, from 1919 to 1923. The day of Ned Keogh’s release and homecoming from Hare Park Camp at the end of the Civil War is recalled, as is the financial strain endured by his wife due to the lack of a State pension. The forming, by Ned Keogh, of the Liam Lynch Fianna Fáil Cumann in Drimnagh in South Dublin, is also described. Tracks 5-7: A linen handkerchief embroidered by Liam’s father, Ned Keogh, while he was imprisoned in Hare Park, is displayed and described by Liam Keogh. He also discusses his father’s involvement in helping the successful escape of other prisoners through tunnels dug from the inside of the prison.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 5.80 MB, 3.90 MB, 5.45 MB, 5.92 MB, 10.67 MB, 6.18 MB, 12.47 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Colm Lawless (b. 1926) Colm Lawless (b. 1926)
Interview location: Stillorgan, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-053
Subject: Lawless, Joseph and Lawless, Frank (Interviewee’s father and grandfather respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 51:56
Track 1: The Saucerstown, Fingal, Dublin background to the Lawless family is outlined. Colm Lawless recounts his father, Joseph Lawless’s story of events at Ashbourne in 1916, including an incident during which the interviewee’s grandfather, Frank Lawless, came close to shooting his son during the confusion of the conflict. Track 2: The bomb factory beneath a garage in Parnell Square in Dublin, in which Colm’s father was involved during the War of Independence, is discussed, as is the fact that his father was a driver of a hackney car used to transport the Volunteers at this time. His aunt, Evelyn Lawless, who was a secretary to Michael Collins in Harcourt Street, Dublin in 1919, is recalled, as is her later decision to enter a convent. Colm’s grandfather, Frank Lawless, was arrested and imprisoned in England following the “German Plot” of 1918. Colm’s father, Joseph Lawless, was also arrested and imprisoned in The Curragh, from which he later escaped. The events surrounding these arrests are discussed. Track 3: The anxiety of the Lawless family following the signing of the Treaty is explained – Joseph Lawless joined the Irish Free State Army, accepting the strongly held desire of his father that he do so. Track 4: The Lawless family and their service in the Irish Free State Army, and Michael Fleming, Colm’s maternal uncle who was among those involved in the burning of the Custom House, are recalled. Colm Lawless outlines his memories of growing up at the Curragh Camp, where his father was based with the Irish Army. Track 5: The 1966 Commemorations, and Joseph Lawless’s response to being presented with a Survivor’s Medal, is recalled. Track 6: Joseph Lawless’s army career, his demotion during a Fianna Fáil administration and his later re-instatement, are examined.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 10.37 MB, 6.23 MB, 7.47 MB, 10.67 MB, 3.79 MB, 9.08 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Maureen Haughey (b. 1925), Part 1 Maureen Haughey (b. 1925), Part 1
Interview location: Malahide, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-054
Subject: Lemass, Seán (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 74:30
Track 1: Maureen Haughey discusses the Lemass family business in Capel Street in Dublin, her grandfather, John, and grandmother, Frances, and their personalities. She describes the involvement of her father, Seán Lemass, and his brother Noel in the 1916 Rising. Both were stationed in the GPO and arrested but later released because of their extreme youth. Track 2: Maureen Haughey describes the events of June 1923 when Noel Lemass, an anti-Treaty IRA officer, was abducted in Dublin. His body was found later on the Dublin Mountains and his remains were identified by his best friend, the actor Jimmy O’Dea. She recalls her mother, Kathleen Hughes, who in 1924 married Seán Lemass, who rose through the Republican ranks. She remembers being told by Todd Andrews that her father had been one of Michael Collins’s Twelve Apostles. Her aunt would recall the week of the Rising “when the sun shone every day”. Track 3: Maureen Haughey recalls canvassing for her father as a young girl, her father as a family man, and his involvement in family life. She mentions her brother Noel whose school friend, Charlie Dalton, was the son of Emmet Dalton, a leading member of the Free State. She recounts an anecdote told by her father relating to his involvement with Paddy O’Brien, on a Volunteer march to Wexford under the command of Andrew McDonald, during which Paddy was shot dead. She recalls the 1966 Commemoration ceremonies and her pride in her father who was Taoiseach at this time. Track 4: Maureen Haughey discusses her father’s reluctance to speak of Michael Collins, The relationship between her father and Éamon de Valera is described. Mention is made of the Capuchins who occupied the upper floor of the Lemass family business in Capel Street. The Derry parents of her husband, Charles Haughey, are recalled. His mother was a member of Cumann na mBan, (the Women’s League, pledged to work for the establishment of an Irish Republic) launched at Wynn’s Hotel, Dublin, in April 1914. A majority of its members rejected the Treaty and many were imprisoned during the Civil War. Charles Haughey’s father took the Treaty side at this time. Track 5: Maureen recalls her schooldays at Muckross Park and studying Commerce at UCD where Charles Haughey was also a student. Track 6: Seán Lemass’s reading material for relaxation is recalled. Also recalled is an occasion during WWII (the Emergency) when a government purchased fishing vessel was blown up by a German submarine, and the evacuation of the Lemass children to Skerries at this time. Track 7: The Troubles in Northern Ireland are recalled, as is the Garda security at the family home. Also recalled is Hugh Earley, ministerial driver for her father and his friend from Civil War days. In 1965 Seán Lemass and economist T. K. Whittaker held a secret meeting in Stormont with Captain Terence O’Neill, Prime Minister of Northern Ireland, which is recalled. Track 8: The current location of family papers is discussed. Seán Lemass’s death in May 1971 and the State funeral afforded him are recalled.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 9.87 MB, 8.14 MB, 9.00 MB, 7.41 MB, 6.06 MB, 16.81 MB, 5.63 MB 932.00 KB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Maureen Haughey (b. 1925), Part 2 Maureen Haughey (b. 1925), Part 2
Interview location: Malahide, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-055
Subject: Lemass, Seán (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 74:07
Track 1: Maureen Haughey discusses the pastimes of her father, Seán Lemass, which included golf and fishing. Track 2: She recalls her father’s first Ministry in Industry and Commerce and the close friendships he maintained throughout his life. At an early stage in his political career he travelled with a delegation on a steamer to Ottawa, Canada. Included is a discussion on an autograph book in which her father wrote a short poem while in prison during the Civil War. Track 3: Maureen Haughey describes visits to her aunts, Alice Boland and Claire Lyle, at the family business in Capel Street, which their sister May managed for many years. Track 4: She recalls her father’s political career and mentions Joe Leyden, his private secretary for years. Track 5: Contains reminiscences of the Emergency, (1939-1945) including transport challenges, coupons, the “glimmer man”, the Blueshirts and compulsory tillage, at a time when her father was in charge of supplies from overseas. Track 6: Maureen Haughey describes visits to the Curragh Camp during the Emergency and playing tennis with the German internees. She recalls the shooting of her father’s friend, Paddy O’Brien. Paddy’s brother, a member of the Garda Siochána, was also shot by the IRA in the 1940s. Maureen reminisces about her father as a pipe smoker. She mentions meeting John F. Kennedy, Ronald Reagan, Terence O’Neill and Brian Faulkner. Her mother’s friendship with the mother of actress Maureen O’Hara is recalled. Track 7: Following the defeat of Fianna Fáil in 1948, her father became national organiser in Fianna Fáil headquarters in Mount Street, Dublin. The shared business interests of the Boland and Haughey families are described, as are the tensions between them which were a legacy of the Civil War.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 7.59 MB, 11.78 MB, 4.00 MB, 7.05 MB, 10.99 MB, 17.67 MB, 8.86 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Maureen Haughey (b. 1925), Part 3 Maureen Haughey (b. 1925), Part 3
Interview location: Malahide, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-056
Subject: Lemass, Seán (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 49:48
Track 1: Maureen Haughey explains how her father, Seán Lemass, was not a man to hold grudges following the Civil War and the killing of his brother, Noel. His total focus was on the future of the country, and in attempting to create prosperity for that future, she says. She also explains that during Lemass’s time in government, many state-owned companies were headed by old republican colleagues. As a child, Maureen recalls many social occasions at the Lemass home, attended by other serving politicians, and the attendance of Éamon de Valera at the celebration of her parents’ fortieth wedding anniversary at the Haughey home at Grangemore, Raheny, in Dublin. Track 2: The assistance afforded to Maureen by her father during her student days at UCD is recalled, as is a visit she and her husband, Charles Haughey, paid to Malahide Castle to meet the Talbot family when the decision was made to hand the castle over to the State. Track 3: Many prominent personalities, from home and abroad, are recalled, including people such as François Mitterand and Senator Ted Kennedy. Track 4: The political career of Maureen Haughey’s husband is discussed in detail. Track 5: Maureen Haughey’s qualification in commerce from UCD is recalled, as is her working career prior to her marriage to Charles Haughey. A fond anecdote is told relating to cycling trips to race meetings with her father and her sister to Phoenix Park and Leopardstown in earlier days, and her great friendship with Joe McGrath is recalled. The illnesses suffered by Maureen and her sister in young adulthood are mentioned. Tracks 6-7: Contains a discussion on the Arms Trial of the 1970s. Seán Lemass’s love of pipe-smoking is also recalled.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 11.43 MB, 4.86 MB, 7.97 MB, 5.28 MB, 7.58 MB, 6.68 MB, 1.86 MB
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Interviewee: Jimmy Leonard (b. 1939) and Clare Duffy (b. 1934) Jimmy Leonard (b. 1939) and Clare Duffy (b. 1934)
Interview location: Terenure, Dublin, and Dalkey, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-057
Subject: Leonard, Joseph (interviewees’ father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 54:54
Track 1: Jimmy Leonard discusses the Leonard family background. He explains that his father, Joseph Leonard, very seldom spoke of his experiences during the 1916-1923 period. Leonard was a member of Michael Collins’s Squad, and his son describes his father’s attempted jail-break of Seán McKeon from Mountjoy Jail. His time in Kerry with the Free State Army during the Civil War is also recalled. Track 2: Joe Leonard resigned from the army in 1926, and he maintained friendships with former colleagues, Paddy O’Daly and Dan Holland thereafter, his son explains. He also discusses his own discovery of guns and ammunition in the family home, many years after his father’s death. Track 3: Old photographs and letters are displayed and examined, and Jimmy Leonard discusses his own feelings about the atrocities carried out by both sides during the Civil War. Joe Leonard’s actions on the occasion of Ireland’s leaving the Commonwealth in 1949 are recalled. Track 4: Jimmy Leonard proudly displays his father’s military medals, and explains their value to him. An amusing anecdote is related regarding the attempted rescuing of Seán McKeon from Mountjoy Jail during the War of Independence by Joe Leonard and others. Track 5: Clare Duffy recalls her childhood in the Leonard household at Fortfield Road in Terenure, her father’s reluctance to discuss his experiences in 1916, and her reaction to the details of his involvement with Collins’s Twelve Apostles (also known as the Squad). Track 6: A visit by Richard Mulcahy to her father, during which the two men discussed the 1916-1923 period is recalled, as is her father’s demeanour, and his religious faith. Joe Leonard’s untimely death in the early 1960s, and the trauma he had previously suffered, are also recalled. Track 7: Johanna Crone, Clare Duffy’s mother, and her family, are recalled. Track 8: This track contains a discussion on the funeral of Joe Leonard, and the apprehension felt by his widow about the possibility of a demonstration on that occasion.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 7.26 MB, 3.58 MB, 5.48 MB, 6.85 MB, 6.00 MB, 7.30 MB, 5.72 MB, 8.15 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Dolores Lynch (b. 1928) Dolores Lynch (b. 1928)
Interview location: Courtown, Co. Wexford
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-058
Subject: Lynch, Diarmuid (Interviewee’s half-uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 62:48
Track 1: The Lynch family of Granig, Tracton, Co. Cork, and Diarmuid Lynch’s childhood, is described. His meeting with Michael Collins in London while working in the British Civil Service is mentioned, as is the group “Friends of Irish Freedom” which Diarmuid formed in America. His holding of a senior position in the IRB, Sinn Féin and the Irish Volunteers is also explained, and his work in New York in promoting the Irish language and culture, through his membership of the Gaelic League of New York, is recalled. Track 2: Contains details of Diarmuid Lynch’s negative views on the activities of Éamon de Valera relating to fundraising for the Irish cause in America in 1920. Lynch’s presence as Staff Captain with Thomas Clarke in the GPO during the Rising is described, as is the fact that he was the last Volunteer to leave the GPO after the surrender. Dolores’s father, Michael Lynch, a Volunteer in Cork, was well prepared to fight until the Countermanding Order was received. His feelings about the Order are described. She also explains that the 78historical information she has acquired came through her presence at visits to her half-uncle, Diarmuid Lynch, by historians and authors. Track 3: Dolores’s schooling at Coláiste Ciarán in Cork, while she lived in Granig, is described, along with a discussion on Diarmuid Lynch’s actions as Controller of Food for Sinn Féin in the First Dáil. Track 4: Contains details of Diarmuid Lynch’s deportation in 1918 to America, following his imprisonment in England after the Rising, and his arrangement for the transportation to Ireland of the remains of John Devoy. Diarmuid and Michael Lynch opposed the Treaty, though Michel Lynch was close to Michael Collins. It is explained that this stance created a split between the Lynch and the Coveney families, neighbours of long standing. Track 5: Diarmuid Lynch married Kathleen ‘Kit’ Quinn while he was imprisoned in Dundalk Jail in 1918. (His half-brother Michael married her sister Carmel Quinn.) Dolores provides details of the day of the wedding of Diarmuid and Kit. Track 6: Contains a description of the bitterness felt by Diarmuid Lynch at his ousting from Sinn Féin by Éamon de Valera, and recollections of his close friends, including Florence O’Donoghue and General Costello. Track 7: Dolores recalls that from 1936 to 1940, Diarmuid Lynch collected material from survivors of the Rising in an attempt to produce a factual account of events. She also explains that she spent her summer holidays at the Lynch home at Granig in Co. Cork in her young days, while her family was based in Co. Wicklow, where her father worked for the Land Commission.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 7.41 MB, 7.08 MB, 7.14 MB, 9.32 MB, 9.05 MB, 7.79 MB, 9.78 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Dr. Gearóid Lynch (b. 1932) Dr. Gearóid Lynch (b. 1932)
Interview location: Swords, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-059
Subject: Lynch, Fionán (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 43:34
Track 1: The Kerry background to the Lynch family is described by Dr. Gearóid Lynch, along with the family’s move to Dublin prior to 1916. Gearóid describes the involvement of Fionán Lynch with the Irish Volunteers, the week of the Rising, and stories told to him by his father relating to his death sentence, his reprieve and imprisonment in the Isle of Wight. Gearóid also recounts the visit of the BBC to the Lynch home in 1966 to record Fionán Lynch. (This recording is included in this Irish Life and Lore 1916 Rising Oral History Collection.) Track 2: Details of the shared accommodation of Fionán Lynch and Michael Collins in Harcourt Street, Dublin, during the War of Independence are provided. Fionán Lynch’s close friendship with Tomás Ashe and the effect of Tomás death on Fionán are described. Both Fionán Lynch and Bridget Slattery, parents of Gearóid Lynch, travelled with the Irish Delegation to London for the Treaty negotiations, and Gearóid’s views on the signing of the Treaty are provided. Track 3: Fionán Lynch’s time in the First Dáil and on the First Executive Council, where he was the only person to keep in touch with Éamon de Valera, is described, as is his time in the Irish Army in Kerry during the Civil War, and the emotional consequences resulting from that time. Track 4: Fionán Lynch retired from politics in 1944 and was appointed by Éamon de Valera as Circuit Court Judge to Donegal and Sligo, having graduated as a barrister during his tenure in Government. His son points out that he was advised by his father not to become involved in politics but, for a short time, Gearóid did become a member of the Fine Gael Cumann in Swords. Track 5: Explores the reasons why Fionán Lynch did not write his memoir but did give his testimony to the Bureau of Military History. The family pride in their immediate Lynch history is described.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 9.69 MB, 9.20 MB, 9.94 MB, 7.70 MB, 3.42 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Fionán Lynch (b. 1889) Fionán Lynch (b. 1889)
Interview location: Unknown
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-060
Subject: Lynch, Fionán (recording courtesy of the Lynch family)
Recorded by: BBC Radio
Recording date: 1966
Length: 55:52
Track 1: Fionán Lynch discusses his career in teaching, from his training days beginning in 1909 at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin. His friendship with Gearóid O’Sullivan is also mentioned, as is his joining of the Gaelic League (where he taught Irish), and the Irish Volunteers, F Company, First Battalion. Track 2: Fionán Lynch was Captain of F Company in the week before the Rising, during a period which he describes as “a week of rumours”. Mention is made of the O’Connor brothers, John and Tommy, of Sherrard Street, with whom Thomas Clarke stayed during this week. Track 3: On Good Friday 1916, Fionán Lynch, Shouldice and O’Hegarty were ordered to go to King Street and Church Street, where they were to be positioned during the week, Fionán Lynch explains. He also discusses the unsuccessful plan to bring wireless apparatus from Cahirciveen to Dublin, a trip in which he was initially meant to be involved. Track 4: Fionán Lynch recalls reading, with Gearóid O’Sullivan, the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin MacNeill in the Sunday Independent, following which they brought the newspaper to Seán McDiarmada at 44 Mountjoy Street, who was bitterly disappointed. Meetings of the Irish Volunteer leaders at the headquarters of the Keating Branch of the Gaelic League are recalled, as is the decision later that Sunday that the Rising would begin on the following day. Track 5: The arrival of the men at 44, Mountjoy Street to collect uniforms, guns and ammunition early on Easter Monday, is described. The later assembly at Blackhall Place, then North King Street and along to Church Street is also recalled. The quietness of the first three days of Easter Week are described, as is the heavy fire of Wednesday morning at North King Street, and the house to house fighting, resulting in many civilian casualties. Track 6: The events of Saturday are recalled, including the activities of a British armoured car which was causing much damage, and the retreat to the Four Courts where Fionán Lynch saw many British officers and soldiers being held. Track 7: The march to Richmond Barracks from The Rotunda Rink on the Sunday morning, and their arrival at Kilmainham Jail are recalled by Fionán Lynch. His transfer to Mountjoy Prison, and his later march to the North Wall, are also recalled. Track 8: The handing over of the arms of the Irish Volunteers after the surrender is described, and the character of The O’Rahilly is recalled. Fionán Lynch also details the journey to Portland Prison in England. The gentle nature of Michael Mallin and James Connolly’s lectures in street fighting, prior to the Rising, are discussed. Track 9: Fionán Lynch describes the reception afforded to the Volunteers on their release from prison and return to Ireland. His subsequent work in canvassing with Tomás Ashe in Clare is also recalled, as is his attendance at the first Roger Casement Commemoration in Tralee, Co. Kerry, in 1917. That year, he was arrested and sentenced to two years imprisonment in Mountjoy Jail, where he and others went on hunger strike, resulting in the death of Ashe. Fionán Lynch records the fact that he was the last person to speak to Ashe before his death.
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Number of files: 9
File size(s): 8.45 MB, 4.27 MB, 2.37 MB, 4.36 MB, 5.70 MB, 4.33 MB, 3.89 MB, 7.42 MB, 10.46 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Teresa McCann (b. 1920) Teresa McCann (b. 1920)
Interview location: Dundalk, Co. Louth
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-061
Subject: McCann, Jack ‘Rover’ (Interviewee’s father-in-law)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 60:50
Track 1: The Price family of Rush, Co. Dublin, is discussed, and the experience suffered by Teresa McCann’s father, John Price, prior to the Rising in 1916 is recalled. She also describes the meeting of her father with Jack ‘Rover’ McCann on the Friday night before Bloody Sunday (21 November 1920) and McCann’s subsequent arrest and execution by the Black and Tans. Track 2: Teresa McCann points out that her future husband, Seán McCann, was born two weeks following the killing of his father, Jack. Jack’s brother was killed during WWI in the Battle of the Somme in 1916, while fighting with the British Army some months after Jack had fought in the 1916 Rising. Track 3: The pain and suffering endured by Teresa’s mother-in-law, Annie McCann, following her husband’s death, was evident to everybody, explains Teresa. Track 4: Séan McCann and his working life in Malahide railway station is recalled by his widow, and she also discusses the memorial to Jack McCann in Fingal, and the fact that his widow, Annie McCann, did not attend any of the memorial ceremonies in the year after his death, or in the following years. Track 5: Teresa McCann recalls that her husband, Séan, would raise the tricolour at Malahide railway station each year during Easter week, to the concern of some of the local population. Mary Monks, who taught with Tomás Ashe in Corduff National School, is also recalled.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 13.98 MB, 6.13 MB, 7.42 MB, 14.47 MB, 13.74 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Domhnall McCullough (b. 1921) Domhnall McCullough (b. 1921)
Interview location: Terenure, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-062
Subject: McCullough, Denis (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 65:01
Track 1: Domhnall McCullough’s father, Denis McCullough, is recalled and his personality is described. Domhnall also recalls his paternal grandmother who lived in Belfast, and his father’s pride in being from Northern Ireland and being a nationalist at heart. Track 2: The communication between the Irish Volunteers in the North of Ireland and Seán MacDiarmada in Dublin, prior to the Rising, is described. Denis McCullough’s career in printing at this time is mentioned. Domhnall describes his father’s great disappointment at not being involved in the Rising. Track 3: Domhnall McCullough recalls his mother Agnes, a Belfast teacher who became involved in the Gaelic League where she met her future husband. (The Gaelic League was founded on 31 July 1893 by, among others, Douglas Hyde and Eoin MacNeill, in Dublin.) Track 4: A discussion follows on the decision made by the McCullough family to move from Belfast to Dublin to set up a music business, McCullough Pigott, at Howard Street in March 1921, which was later relocated to Dawson Street. Denis McCullough became the first Chairman of the New Ireland Assurance Company, which had its aspirational origins in Frongoch Camp in North Wales, where he was imprisoned after the Rising. Track 5: Domhnall McCullough recalls his own childhood and the fact that his parents did not discuss their nationalist activities of former days. He remembers occasions when friends from those days would gather at the family home, and the heated debates which would take place. Track 6: Contains memories of Denis McCullough at the 1966 Commemmorations in Dublin and the unveiling of a plaque at the offices of the Irish Times. The love of the Irish language in the McCullough family is discussed, as is Domhnall McCullough’s period of service with the Irish Army during the Emergency (1939-1945), and his later career. Track 7: The funeral of Denis McCullough, and the single piper who played on that occasion are recalled, and a visit by Denis McCullough to the home of Bulmer Hobson in earlier years is discussed.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.66 MB, 6.46 MB, 4.05 MB, 7.30 MB, 11.71 MB, 12.81 MB, 10.58 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Denis McCullough (b. 1948) Denis McCullough (b. 1948)
Interview location: Blackhall Place, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-063
Subject: McCullough, Denis (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 64:53
Track 1: Denis McCullough explains that he was aware of his grandfather Denis McCullough’s place in history from a very young age. The circumstances of his grandfather’s life prior to, and following, the family’s move to Dublin in 1921, and his grandmother Agnes, who was a member of the nationalist Ryan family, are discussed. Track 2: The period in the North of Ireland prior to the 1916 Rising, and his grandfather’s role at this time, are discussed by Denis McCullough. He also explains the less than positive views taken by his grandfather on the Rising, views shared by Bulmer Hobson. The character of Denis McCullough Senior, and the principles he held, are detailed. Track 3: Agnes McCullough (née Ryan) from Wexford is recalled by her grandson, who occasionally spent time in his youth living at his grandparents’ home. The pro-Treaty stance adopted by his grandparents, who would also provide shelter to anti-Treaty personnel during the Civil War at their home in Oakley Road in Ranelagh, and the personal and individual opinions held by his grandparents, are explored. Tracks 4-7: The views of Denis McCullough Senior on his duty to stand for election for the First Dáil are explained. (Dáil Éireann first assembled on 21 January 1919 following the general election of December 1918.) Mention is also made of the setting up of the McCullough Pigott business and of the New Ireland Assurance Company. Contains interviewee’s own memories of going to Croke Park to watch GAA matches with his grandfather and of meeting some of Denis McCullough’s old comrades from the North in Dublin.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 9.53 MB, 8.78 MB, 9.43 MB, 3.08 MB, 8.32 MB, 9.29 MB, 11.03 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Fionnuala MacCurtain (b. 1953) Fionnuala MacCurtain (b. 1953)
Interview location: Wilton, Cork
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-064
Subject: MacCurtain, Tomás and MacCurtain, Tomás Óg (Interviewee’s grandfather and father respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 61:12
Track 1: The Mourne Abbey, Co. Cork, background to the MacCurtain family, which relocated to Blackpool on the north side of Cork city, is described by Fionnuala MacCurtain, who explains that her grandfather, Tomás MacCurtain, became involved in the Gaelic League in Cork where he met his future wife, Bandon-born Éilís Walsh, whom he married in 1908. Fionnuala explains that her father, Tomás Óg, witnessed his father’s murder by the RIC in March 1920. The information she has regarding her grandfather, and his funeral, came from her father. Track 2: The mobilisation of the Irish Volunteers in Cork city and county, the Countermanding Order by Eoin MacNeill, and the total confusion it created, are described. They are also clearly detailed in Fionnuala’s grandfather’s diaries. A letter written to her grandmother by her husband in 1917, setting out his strong convictions and beliefs in his nationalistic ideals, is read by Fionnuala MacCurtain. Track 3: Tomás Óg MacCurtain lost his father and his godfather, Terence MacSwiney, within eight months of one another, explains Fionnuala MacCurtain. (Terence MacSwiney died on 25 October 1920, following a 74-day hunger-strike in Brixton Prison in England.) She also discusses her father’s character, the passing on of the republican baton to him and his entry into the IRA movement, a membership he maintained until 1958. Track 4: Fionnuala’s father’s experiences while a member of the IRA, including his imprisonment in Curragh Camp, his courtmartial, his death sentence and his later reprieve are all discussed. Some of the MacCurtain family archive is displayed and discussed, as are Tomás MacCurtain’s military medals. His great utilisation of his office as Lord Mayor of Cork, is also recalled.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 17.27 MB, 9.79 MB, 13.79 MB, 15.22 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Lucille Redmond (b. 1949) Lucille Redmond (b. 1949)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-065
Subject: MacDonagh, Thomas (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 48:01
Track 1: Barbara Redmond, mother of Lucille Redmond, was the daughter of Thomas MacDonagh. He was an educationalist, born in Cloughjordan, Co. Tipperary. His granddaughter describes him as a socialist and humaninst rather than a radicalist. She describes his involvement in the Howth gun running in 1914. Track 2: Thomas MacDonagh’s friendship with Eoin MacNeill is recalled and Lucille gives her views on the Countermanding Order by MacNeill, together with her grandfather’s determination to nonetheless proceed with the Easter Rising. Track 3: Thomas MacDonagh’s subsequent arrest and death sentence, and the family’s experiences during the period before his execution in Kilmainham are described. Lucille’s grandmother, Muriel, was a sister of Grace Gifford, who married Joseph Plunkett at Kilmainham Jail. She is also discussed. Track 4: The circumstances leading to Muriel MacDonagh’s tragic death in 1917 and its aftermath are recalled by her granddaughter. Track 5: Lucille Redmond’s granduncle, Joe MacDonagh, who took an active role on the republican side during the Civil War, is recalled. Lucille provides her own views on the 1916 revolutionaries, their idealism and the contrast between them and later Irish revolutionaries. She explains that her mother’s godfather was P. H. Pearse. Track 6: Lucille recalls her mother Barbara’s feelings of neutrality following the signing of the Treaty. A discussion ensues on the circumstances of the burial of the executed 1916 revolutionaries. Track 7: Lucille Redmond recalls her maternal grandmother Muriel Gifford’s background and her siblings. Track 8: Contains a discussion on the 1966 Commemorations and a speech given by Lucille’s mother, Barbara, at Cloughjordan (birthplace of Thomas MacDonagh) at that time. Lucille reads from a letter written by her grandmother, Muriel, to her husband, Thomas MacDonagh, in 1915. Lucille mentions a very early recording compiled with her grandmother, Muriel, in 1911, the whereabouts of which are unknown. She discusses her knowledge of the circumstances of the lives of her grandparents prior to 1916.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 11.82 MB, 8.57 MB, 1.59 MB, 7.46 MB, 2.50 MB, 4.99 MB, 3.54 MB, 3.54 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Concepta Butler (b. 1937) Concepta Butler (b. 1937)
Interview location: Loughshinny, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-066
Subject: McEvoy, Thomas (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 50:05
Track 1: The Dublin city background to the McEvoy family, who lived off Moore Street, is described by Cepta Butler, and she explains that her grandfather, Andrew McEvoy, served in the British army and was involved in the Boer War and in WWI. During the Rising, her father, 17 year old Thomas McEvoy, was stationed on the roof of the GPO, and also acted as a runner until James Connolly ordered him to run from the house at 16 Moore Street to his nearby home in Samson’s Lane, after the surrender. Track 2: Thomas McEvoy’s involvement in the plan to spring Kevin Barry from Mountjoy Jail on the night before his execution is described, as is Thomas’s detention in The Curragh during the Civil War. The 1966 Commemorations are also recalled. Track 3: Cepta recalls her childhood, her father’s encouragement of the family to speak Irish, and the strength of her grandmother, Annie McEvoy, whose two young sons, Thomas and Christopher, were out in 1916. Her husband was absent fighting with the British Army during WWI. Guns and munitions for the Volunteers were hidden in the McEvoy family home at this time. Track 4: Thomas McEvoy’s application for a State pension and her recollection of his entry on the application form is recounted, details of which involved the throwing of home-made grenades at British Army lorries at Mount Street Bridge. Tracks 5-6: Thomas McEvoy’s many experiences, and his escapes during the Civil War in Dublin owing to his intimate knowledge of the city, are described, as is the photograph taken of her uniformed father and uncle in the guard of honour at the funeral of Tomás Ashe in 1917.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 5.82 MB, 10.17 MB, 794.45 KB, 11.37 MB, 6.24 MB, 11.53 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Mary McGrath (b. 1948) Mary McGrath (b. 1948)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-067
Subject: McGrath, Joseph (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 50:33
Track 1: Mary McGrath’s earliest memories of her grandfather, Joseph McGrath, on visits to his home in Cabinteely in Dublin, are recalled, and she details his characteristics and his passion for horses. He and his brother, Patrick, were out in the 1916 Rising, and their activities at this time are discussed. Joseph McGrath’s position in Marrowbone Lane is described. His retelling of the story of his escape from prison in England, and his enjoyment in its telling, is also recounted, as is his membership of the First Dáil and his support of the Treaty. Track 2: Joseph McGrath and Michael Collins were close friends. Mary explains that her grandfather warned Collins about the danger of going to West Cork on the eve of his departure from Dublin. He was shot at Béal na Bláth on 22 August 1922. The effect on the military of the death of Collins is articulated. Mary explains that because of his dissatisfaction with the attitude of the government to the Army mutiny at the Curragh, Joseph McGrath resigned from his position in government in 1924. Joseph McGrath maintained friendships in business with people from both sides of the divide in later years, and his granddaughter describes his success in the breeding and training of thoroughbred horses. Track 3: Contains a discussion on the Irish Hospital Sweepstakes and its origins and successes, and the other business ventures in which Joseph McGrath was involved. His wife, Aileen Downes, is also recalled by her granddaughter. Track 4: The funeral of Joseph McGrath and the attendance is described. Mary McGrath discusses the businesses in which her grandfather was involved in his later years. Track 5: Mary’s childhood visits to the McGrath home in Cabinteely are recounted, and she recalls her grandfather speaking of the 1916 Rising. Her feelings of bearing the McGrath name and her pride in her connection to a man of vision and foresight, who fought in 1916, are also described.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 8.25 MB, 7.20 MB, 11.16 MB, 10.84 MB, 8.88 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Fr. Hugh MacMahon Fr. Hugh MacMahon
Interview location: Westland Square , Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-068
Subject: MacMahon, Brian; MacMahon, Peadar; and MacMahon, Sorcha (Interviewee’s father, uncle and aunt respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 44:36
Track 1: The Monaghan background of the MacMahon family is explored and Fr. Hugh MacMahon explains that his father, Brian MacMahon, came to Dublin in 1915 to live in Glasnevin with his sister, Sorcha and brother, Peadar, who had arrived there in 1912 and had lived in Amiens Street in a house close to that of Thomas and Kathleen Clarke. Shortly after Brian’s arrival in Dublin he joined the Irish Volunteers in which his brother, Peadar, was a Section Commander under Thomas MacDonagh. Track 2: The illness suffered by Brian MacMahon in the days prior to the Rising, which led to his hospitalisation at the Fever Hospital for the duration of the conflict, is discussed. His siblings, Peadar and Sorcha, a member of Cumann na mBan, were involved in the Rising. Peader was with Michael Mallin in Stephen’s Green, and later in the College of Surgeons. Sorcha was cycling round the city with guns in her bicycle basket, for delivery mainly to the GPO. She also collected messages from Thomas Clarke and P. H. Pearse for delivery to their families. Fr. Hugh explains that, after the Rising, she smuggled her brother Brian’s Volunteer uniform back to their home in Monaghan. During the War of Independence, Brian MacMahon was Adjutant of the South Monaghan Battalion of the Volunteers, acting as a training officer on the instructions of Michael Collins. Track 3: Sorcha MacMahon’s deep involvement in the Irish Volunteers Dependents’ Fund with Kathleen Clarke, after 1916, is discussed. Fr. Hugh explains that Sorcha did not become involved in the Civil War, due to her deep friendship with people on both sides. She married Tom Rogers and the couple had one child, Peg, from whom Fr. Hugh got much of his information on the family’s involvement in the 1916-1923 period. Track 4: Contains details of Brian MacMahon’s role in the Civil War, as Captain in the Free State Army, based in Dundalk Barracks. The attack on the barracks by republicans, under the command of Frank Aiken, on 14 August 1922, which caused life-long injuries to his father, is described in detail by Fr. Hugh. In 1932, Brian married Rose Finnegan from Killanny, near Carrickmacross. During the War of Independence, Peadar MacMahon stayed with the Daly family in Limerick, where he organised the IRA in the area. During the Civil War, he was Officer in Command stationed at the Curragh, and was promoted to Chief of Staff of the Free State Army. Tracks 5-6: Fr. Hugh MacMahon explains that much of his information on his father’s activities during the War of Independence came from notes made by his father, and kept by Canon Marron in Monaghan on condition that the contents should not be released until recently. In the notes, details are given of the fact that the local parish priest gave permission to the Volunteers on the run to miss Sunday Mass, due to the risk of being spotted by the authorities.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 5.59 MB, 9.43 MB, 5.84 MB, 5.46 MB, 7.61 MB, 6.66 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Séamus McNally (b. 1922) Séamus McNally (b. 1922)
Interview location: Lusk, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-069
Subject: McNally, Jack (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 74:13
Track 1: The McNally family background in Lusk is set out, and Jack McNally’s joining of the Fingal Brigade of the Irish Volunteers and his position at a top window of the GPO during the 1916 Rising, are also described by his son Séamus. The retreat from the GPO, and Jack McNally’s escape, having been close to The O’Rahilly in Moore Street, are discussed. The order given to the men in Ashbourne to come into Dublin early in Easter Week, and their journey there by bicycle, are also recalled. Track 2: Contains an account of the teaching by Tomás Ashe in Corduff National School near Lusk, and his pupil, Jack McNally, who joined Ashe’s band. Also contained is a story of the raid on the McNally home by the Black and Tans, and the stealing by them of Jack McNally’s beloved fiddle. The fact that Jack McNally played at Tomás Ashe’s funeral is also recalled. Track 3: Séamus McNally recalls his mother, Jubilee Nurse Annie Thorne, and her work in the Fingal area. Séamus’s wife, Mary, displays some of the McNally family memorabilia. It is explained that Jack McNally’s testimony was not included in the Bureau of Military History records. Track 4: Mary McNally (née Hogan) recalls stories of her future husband’s family who lived opposite her family home, and being told of the day that Jack McNally left for Dublin early in Easter Week, and his father’s grief at his departure. Track 5: Memories of Tomás Ashe are discussed, including his organisational and leadership skills and his inspirational character. Track 6: The Black Raven Pipe Band, formed by Tomás Ashe and continued after his death, is recalled as it performed locally during the 1930s. Memories are shared of Séamus’s aunt Margaret, who brought him up following the untimely death of his mother, and of her social work in the area. Tracks 7-8: At the end of the 1916-1923 period, Jack McNally settled back into his former farming life in Lusk, loving his card games with friends. His work and leisure times, from then onwards, are recalled by his son.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 9.26 MB, 8.59 MB, 6.36 MB, 4.80 MB, 10.53 MB, 6.02 MB, 16.38 MB, 6.06 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Michael McDowell (b. 1951) Michael McDowell (b. 1951)
Interview location: Blackhall Place, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-070
Subject: MacNeill, Eoin (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 48:50
Track 1: The Antrim background of Eoin MacNeill, along with his Dublin education, are discussed in detail by Michael McDowell. Track 2: Eoin MacNeill’s reaction to the determination of the IRB leaders to go ahead with the Rising in 1916 is described. The 3: The reasons for the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin MacNeill and his actions during Easter Week are explained, as is the fact that he gave himself up to the authorities following the surrender of the leaders of the Rising. His grandson also discusses letters written by Eoin MacNeill while in prison in Dartmoor following the Rising. Track 4: The MacNeill home in Blackrock, Dublin, and its use as an arms dump during the War of Independence, is recalled. Also discussed is the fact that Eoin MacNeill’s three sons joined the IRA at this time. MacNeill’s response to the signing of the Treaty and the loss of one son to the Anti-Treaty side during the Civil War, is explained. Track 5: The Boundary Commission and Eoin MacNeill’s involvement therein from 1924, until his retirement in 1927, is described in detail. Michael McDowell’s realisation of his grandfather’s important role in Irish history during the 1966 Commemorations is recalled. Track 6: Eoin MacNeill’s career in academia following his retirement from public life in 1927 is described. Also discussed is Michael’s feelings about both sides of his family, their involvement in Irish history, and his anxiety that his grandfather’s legacy should be accurately portrayed. He gives his views on the manner in which the centenary of 1916 should be commemorated. Track 7: Michael McDowell’s education at Gonzaga College in Dublin, the teaching staff there, and his consciousness of the fact that some of his peers were descendants of revolutionary figures, are described. His own political career is also mentioned.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 4.52 MB, 5.12 MB, 5.00 MB, 5.75 MB, 5.48 MB, 8.87 MB, 10.03 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Máire Brugha (b. 1918) Máire Brugha (b. 1918)
Interview location: Blackrock, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-071
Subject: MacSwiney, Terence (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2009
Length: 72:08
Track 1: Máire Brugha describes her family background in Cork and her mother Muriel’s close friends, the O’Briens of Blarney and Geraldine Neeson (née O’Sullivan), through whom she met her future husband, Terence MacSwiney, afterwards elected Lord Mayor of Cork in 1920. He was subsequently to die on hunger strike in Brixton Prison in England. Track 2: The difficulties encountered by her mother, Muriel Murphy, due to her family’s opposition to her proposed marriage to Terence MacSwiney, are explained. The couple married in Bromyard Internment Camp in Wales where Terence MacSwiney was held. The best man (and Máire’s godfather) was Richard Mulcahy. Muriel Murphy’s bridesmaid was Geraldine Neeson. Track 3: Memories of Máire MacSwiney’s childhood in Germany are discussed, as is the fact that she knew nothing of events in Ireland at that time. Her return to Ireland in the company of her paternal aunt, and the challenging journey they endured, is recalled. Track 4: The custody case in Dublin, when she was fourteen years old, following her return to Cork to live with her aunts, is discussed. During the case, she stayed at the home of Peadar and Lil O’Donnell. Máire recounts an anecdote about her aunt Mary MacSwiney’s dismissal from her teaching post at St. Angela’s College on St. Patrick’s Hill, Cork. Track 5: Máire Brugha’s response to learning for the first time about her father’s involvement In the Irish fight for freedom is described, and she reverts in memory to a trip at a very young age from Cork to Dublin to stay at the O’Rahilly home. (Michael O’Rahilly was shot dead in Moore Street in Dublin on 28 April 1916, leading the first party out of the GPO.) Máire’s mother Muriel’s unpredictable nature is also recalled. Track 6: Boarding school days at St. Louis Convent in Monaghan and Máire’s education through Irish are discussed. Máire Brugha discusses the circumstances which led to her meeting with Ruairí Brugha and their subsequent marriage in the Honan Chapel in University College Cork. (Ruairí Brugha was the son of Cathal Brugha, who was hugely involved in the fight for independence.) Their decision to rear their children without any reference to the revolutionary period is also explained. The absence of any obvious remembrance of her father, Terence MacSwiney, in Cork in earlier decades is discussed.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 8.86 MB, 5.61 MB, 8.76 MB, 10.03 MB, 5.85 MB, 26.97 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Fr. Joseph Mallin (b. 1913), Part 1 Fr. Joseph Mallin (b. 1913), Part 1
Interview location: Hong Kong
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-072
Subject: Mallin, Michael (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 58:00
Track 1: Fr. Joseph Mallin describes his Mallin and Hickey family backgrounds. Track 2: The activities of his aunts and uncles during the 1916 -1923 period are discussed. The many raids on the Mallin home by the British forces are recalled, as are reminders to Joseph Mallin by his sister, Máire, of their visit to Kilmainham Jail on the night of their father Michael Mallin’s execution. He explains the reasons why he was given his christian name and speaks of his father’s wish that he would become a priest. He recalls his carers in childhood after his mother became unwell, which included Una Gordon (later to become the wife of Austin Stack) and Margaret Pearse, sister of P. H. Pearse, who cared for him and his sister in St. Enda’s. Track 3: Fr. Joseph describes the support of his mother by the White Cross. (The White Cross was a Sinn Féin organisation founded in Dublin in February 1921 to distribute the American White Cross Fund. It was used to assist the men and their families who suffered because of their involvement during the War of Independence.) Track 4: Contains details of Michael Mallin’s involvement in the 1916 Rising. His son gives his views on the surrender. Track 5: Visits by revolutionaries to the Mallin home are recalled. Track 6: Fr. Joseph Mallin reflects on being the only surviving child of an executed leader of the 1916 Rising. He discusses his education and his reasons for becoming a Jesuit priest. Tracks 7-8: Fr. Mallin mentions his brother, Séamus Mallin, and an accident with a gun. He reflects upon his own trip to Kilmainham on a visit to Ireland from Hong Kong, and its effect. His memories of the Black and Tans and of being brought by motor car to a 1916 commemoration event during his childhood, are described. He recalls meeting with Éamon de Valera during a visit home from Hong Kong in 1966, and a previously unrevealed secret told to him by de Valera.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 7.06 MB, 6.07 MB, 3.60 MB, 4.72 MB, 2.36 MB, 5.05 MB, 11.38 MB 9.28 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Fr. Joseph Mallin (b. 1913), Part 2 Fr. Joseph Mallin (b. 1913), Part 2
Interview location: Hong Kong
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-073
Subject: Mallin, Michael (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 73:27
Track 1: Details are provided of Fr. Joseph Mallin’s formation years with the Jesuit community, the outbreak of WWII, the Blueshirts, and Margaret Pearse’s fear of General Eoin O’Duffy. Comparisons are made between the Irish and the Chinese cultures. Track 2: The timing of the 1916 Rising is discussed, as is Jack Lynch’s visit to China while he was Taoiseach. Track 3: Fr. Mallin discusses his brother Séamus Mallin’s membership of the IRA. He recalls accompanying him to the Four Courts where he heard the initial shots fired at the end of June 1922, signalling the commencement of the Civil War. Track 4: Memories of the Eucharistic Congress in 1932 are provided, and visits by the Mallin family to Áras an Úachtaráin are recalled. Fr. Mallin examines the present interest in commemorating the 1916 Rising. Track 5: Details of the Dublin locations in which the family lived are outlined, and Fr. Mallin recalls caring for his mother in the last year of her life, and her funeral. He shares his memories of St. Enda’s and the large republican gatherings there. Track 6: Contains a discussion on the plans put in place for the aftermath of the 1916 Rising and Fr. Mallin’s uncle’s involvement with events on Bloody Sunday. Fr. Mallin’s views are outlined in relation to the treatment of his father (who had soldiered in India) by the leaders of the 1916 Rising, who placed him with the Citizen Army in Stephen’s Green. This proved to be a huge strategical error, overlooked, as it was, by surrounding buildings. The garrison subsequently moved into the College of Surgeons. Track 7: A description is provided of the personnel involved with the White Cross organisation, and a discussion on the letters written by his father to his mother while he was stationed in India with the British Army. An anecdote about Jim O’Shea, Michael Mallin’s bodyguard prior to the Rising of 1916, is told.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 10.21 MB, 11.36 MB, 7.44 MB, 9.44 MB, 6.64 MB, 12.19 MB, 10.05 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Risteard Mulcahy (b. 1922), Part 1 Risteard Mulcahy (b. 1922), Part 1
Interview location: Roebuck, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-074
Subject: Mulcahy, Richard (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 58:20
Track 1: Risteard Mulcahy recalls his father, Richard (Dick) Mulcahy, and his work in recording his contemporaries from the 1916-1923 period following his retirement from politics in 1961. (These audio recordings now form part of this Irish Life and Lore 1916 Rising Oral History Collection.) Risteard explains his belief that the Rising in 1916 was a great mistake. He discusses his father’s role in Ahsbourne, Co. Meath, and his refusal in the 1950s to attend a memorial ceremony there. Track 2: Risteard Mulcahy’s mother, Mary Ryan, is recalled and a discussion follows on her family who were also involved in the Troubles. Mary Ryan and her sister, Phyllis, were out in 1916 and their roles at that time are explained. Track 3: Richard Mulcahy’s interest in gathering information about the 1916-1923 period from his comrades following his retirement in 1961 is recalled. Track 4: The background to the Mulcahy family in Thurles, Co. Tipperary, is described, and the fact that all the Mulcahy children were educated in the Irish language is discussed. Track 5: The 1966 Commemorations are recalled, along with Risteard Mulcahy’s view that his father’s legacy was overshadowed by that of Michael Collins. The perceived failings of Collins are described. Track 6: The Sinn Féin Dáil and Richard Mulcahy’s determination that the Irish Army would be subservient to parliament are mentioned. Risteard Mulcahy’s childhood memories are recalled. Track 7: Following the Civil War, Richard Mulcahy never carried a gun, nor did he ever need protection, explains his son.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 11.63 MB, 4.51 MB, 6.21 MB, 4.95 MB, 10.71 MB, 9.98 MB, 5.48 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Risteard Mulcahy (b. 1922), Part 2 Risteard Mulcahy (b. 1922), Part 2
Interview location: Roebuck, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-075
Subject: Mulcahy, Richard (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 69:02
Track 1: Risteard Mulcahy discusses the circumstances, as told to him by his father, Richard (Dick) Mulcahy, about the surrender at Ashbourne following the Rising. He also outlines the reasons why his father was not executed in the aftermath. Track 2: The vacuum which existed following the return of the republicans from English prisons after the Rising is discussed, as is Richard Mulcahy’s first job after his return. The reorganisation and regrouping of the Irish Volunteers from 1918 is examined, the attempted conscription in 1918, and details of the split in the Irish Volunteers, are also explored. Track 3: Risteard Mulcahy talks about his father’s skills in organisation and delegation. Richard Mulcahy’s role in attempting to set up the Irish Army on the establishment of the Provisional Government, following the signing of the Treaty is discussed. Negotiations with the IRA, the Curragh Mutiny and its aftermath, and the shooting of Kevin O’Higgins are also discussed. Track 4: Negotiations with Northern Ireland at the time of the Civil War, the frustration felt by Richard Mulcahy, and the great danger of anarchy in Ireland are examined. Track 5: The women of Cumann na mBan who took the anti-Treaty side and his father’s antipathy towards them is recalled. The role taken by Richard Mulcahy in Irish politics in the years following the 1916-1923 period is described. Track 6: Cumann na nGaedheal, its membership and ethos in the 1920s, are discussed. Track 7: The role of Richard Mulcahy in ensuring the co-operation of the Irish Army with the new Fianna Fáil government from 1932 onward is explained. Track 8: The executed leaders of the 1916 Rising are recalled by Risteard Mulcahy, as are his parents. The Mulcahy family’s desire that their father’s historical legacy should be accurately recognised is emphasised.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 4.41 MB, 7.81 MB, 14.82 MB, 2.89 MB, 8.19 MB, 4.62 MB, 8.88 MB 11.70 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Richard Mulcahy (b. 1886) Richard Mulcahy (b. 1886)
Interview location: Mount Merrion, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-076
Subject: Mulcahy, Richard (recording courtesy of Patrick O’Byrne)
Recorded by: Risteárd Mulcahy (Interviewee’s son)
Recording date: 1964
Length: 23:58
Track 1: Contains the recollections of Richard Mulcahy about Holy Thursday 1916, his lack of knowledge of what was about to occur, and his understanding that he was to take charge of the destruction of the rail line telegraph system through Howth Junction, the Belfast line and communication with London. His instructions on the following day from William Pearse at Fr. Matthew Park to assemble at the GPO on P. H. Pearse’s staff at 4 p.m. on Easter Sunday, are outlined. His meeting with James Connolly during his trip to the GPO on Easter Sunday, and his instructions from Connolly to return home, are recalled. Track 2: Contains a description of Richard Mulcahy’s activities in cutting telegraph wires at Howth on Easter Sunday; his noticing Australian troops at Finglas Golf Club, and his accidental meeting with Tomás Ashe who had taken up position with his men in the area. Ashe’s instruction to Mulcahy to remain with them is also described. Track 3: The orders received from James Connolly, later in Easter Week, to send men to Blanchardstown, and the subsequent trip there by bicycle, under cover of night by Richard Mulcahy and others, is described. This track also contains a short outline of the views of Richard Mulcahy relating to the actions of the Irish Volunteers in 1916, and their convictions.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 7.49 MB, 8.58 MB, 5.90 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Liam (Bill) Hutchinson (b. 1940) Liam (Bill) Hutchinson (b. 1940)
Interview location: Tralee, Co. Kerry
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-077
Subject: Mulvihill, Michael (Interviewee’s granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 49:00
Track 1: The Ballyduff, Co. Kerry, background of the Mulvihill family is explored by Liam Hutchinson, who explains that Michael Mulvihill joined the British Civil Service in London, where he became a member the IRB. Adopting the alias Michael O’Connor, he returned to Dublin in 1916 to take part in the Rising. Track 2: Contains a description of the movements of Michael Mulvihill in the GPO during Easter Week, and his fatal shooting at the corner of Moore Lane, as he accompanied The O’Rahilly onto Moore Street, beside the GPO. The late arrival of the tragic news to the Mulvihill family in North Kerry is also described. Track 3: Liam Hutchinson’s father, John, was a member of the Free State Army, based in Limerick, and his mother, a niece of Michael Mulvihill, was an ardent supporter of Fianna Fáil all her life. Liam Hutchinson explains that his mother’s uncle, Tom, was involved in the War of Independence and the Civil War, and that their father was a teacher who lost his job, leaving the family in near destitution, save for the financial support by his son, Michael Mulvihill, from London. He also explains that the Mulvihill family left for England in the years after 1916. Track 4: A descriptive account of Liam Hutchinson’s strong support of civil rights, and of the hunger strikers in the North of Ireland during the recent Troubles. Track 5: The final resting place of Michael Mulvihill in Glasnevin Cemetery is mentioned, and accounts are related of family lore, including the refusal of an offer of help from the White Cross Fund.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 7.21 MB, 9.72 MB, 13.00 MB, 6.17 MB, 8.81 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Sam Oakes (b. 1928) Sam Oakes (b. 1928)
Interview location: Talbot’s Inch, Kilkenny
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-078
Subject: Oakes, William and Oakes, Michael (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 30:41
Track 1: Sam Oakes discusses the mobilisation of the Irish Volunteers in Kilkenny city prior to the Rising, the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin McNeill, and the great confusion which resulted therefrom. Both William and Michael Oakes were present when it was received. Michael Oakes became involved in the War of Independence, spending some time on the run. An account is given of William Oakes, who was involved in the making of explosives prior to the Civil War and was injured as a result. Track 2: The republican stance taken by the Oakes brothers during the Civil War is described, as is an event witnessed by Sam Oakes as a young man while working with the Health Board in Kilkenny, which illustrated the healing of the divisions between two men who had taken opposite sides in the Civil War. Track 3: Sam Oakes describes how he discovered the details of his father’s life during the 1916-1923 period. He recounts an anecdote, told to him by his father, about ‘Ginger’ O’Connell, a Cork-based ex-United States soldier and later Deputy Chief of Staff of the Free State Army, who would come to Kilkenny to drill the Irish Volunteers in the period before the 1916 Rising.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 11.50 MB, 6.83 MB, 9.79 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Colm O’Brennan (b. 1939) Colm O’Brennan (b. 1939)
Interview location: Tullamore, Co. Offaly
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-079
Subject: O’Brennan, Séamus (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 44:35
Track 1: Colm O’Brennan explains that his grandfather, John O’Brennan, served as an RIC officer in Westmeath and Offaly, and he also discusses the O’Brennan family background. Track 2: Contains a description of the room located over a Tullamore retail outlet, where Sinn Féin members would meet. Séamus went to Dublin where he took part in the Rising in the GPO, under the command of P. H. Pearse. Colm describes his uncle Séamus’s arrest and imprisonment in England after the Rising, and his leading role in later years in the formation of Fianna Fáil. Alo O’Brennan, Colm’s father, who was arrested in Tullamore after the Rising and imprisoned in England, is also recalled, as is Colm’s uncle Frank, who was later interned in Ballykinlar in Co. Down. Track 3: The real force behind the republican idealism in the O’Brennan family came from Colm O’Brennan’s paternal grandmother, he explains. Track 4: The staunch republicanism of the three O’Brennan brothers, which remained undimmed through the years, is explored. Séamus O’Brennan’s funeral, attended by Éamon de Valera and Richard Mulcahy, is also recalled. Track 5: The bias towards the Free State shown by Colm O’Brennan’s educators, and the political divisions within the community which he observed in his early years are recalled. Anecdotes are told to illustrate this divide in Tullamore. The State pension, and its abuse by some individuals, is also discussed.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 6.88 MB, 9.19 MB, 6.85 MB, 6.77 MB, 11.17 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Eileen Butterly (b. 1936), Part 1 Eileen Butterly (b. 1936), Part 1
Interview location: Malahide, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-080
Subject: O’Connor, John S. and O’Connor, Tommy (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 51:07
Track 1: Eileen Butterly describes her O’Connor family background. Her Limerick grandfather, Thomas O’Connor, who moved to Dublin, had republican ideals. Her uncle, Tommy O’Connor, was a member of the IRB who worked as a courier bringing messages from Ireland to America. He was aboard the Carpathia when the Titanic sank in April 1912 and he assisted with the rescue of passengers. After the Rising, he settled in America where he subsequently remained. Track 2: Stories told to Eileen Butterly by her father, John S. O’Connor, are recounted. He was based in North King Street during the Rising, with Frank and Jack Shouldice and Piaras Beaslaí. (Beaslaí helped draft the Constitution for the First Dáil. He was also IRA Director of Propaganda at one time. During the Civil War, he was a major-general in the Free State Army.) Track 3: After the Rising, John S. O’Connor and his brother Tommy were imprisoned in Frongoch Camp in North Wales, and on their release they returned to Dublin. John later qualified as a solicitor and he opened a practice in Ormond Quay in 1926. He was election agent for Éamon de Valera and for Seán T. O’Kelly, and Eileen daughter recalls her father’s time as TD for Dublin North Central. John S. O’Connor was also at one time President of the Law Society. Track 4: Eileen Butterly reads from one of the coded messages brought by her uncle, Tommy O’Connor, from Dublin to John Devoy in New York before the Rising. She speaks about the Emergency (1939-1945) and life in Clontarf at that time. Track 5: Her father’s antipathy towards Fine Gael and the Blueshirts is recalled, as are his feelings about the recent Northern Troubles. Track 6: Eileen describes her time working in her father’s practice before her marriage to Pat Butterly. Track 7: Eileen reads from a letter written by her father to the local RIC station requesting the return of his rifle, seized in 1914. She also discusses a recording of her father, compiled in 1966, and she reveals that Kathleen Clarke, widow of Thomas Clarke, was her godmother. (Thomas Clarke was the first signatory to the 1916 Proclamation and he was executed for his part in the Rising.) Eileen also records her deep admiration for the Clarke family.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 9.14 MB, 11.56 MB, 6.31 MB, 4.14 MB, 5.64 MB, 2.22 MB, 7.84 MB
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Interviewee: Eileen Butterly (b. 1936) and John O’Connor (b. 1940), Part 2 Eileen Butterly (b. 1936) and John O’Connor (b. 1940), Part 2
Interview location: Malahide, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-081
Subject: O’Connor, John S. and O’Connor, Tommy (Interviewees’ father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 39:30
Track 1: Provides Eileen Butterly’s views on the parts played by her father, John S. O’Connor, and her uncle, Tommy O’Connor, in the 1916 Rising. Her views on the Civil War, when the family was supportive of de Valera, are explored. John O’Connor, brother of Eileen Butterly, recalls stories about Frank Keogh as told by John S. O’Connor, and the reasons why their uncle, Tommy O’Connor, decided to relocate to America after the Civil War. Old photographs are examined and discussed, as also is the fact that John S. O’Connor financially assisted old comrades in the years after the conflict. John O’Connor recalls his grandfather, Thomas O’Connor, and the family’s close friendship with Seán T. O’Kelly. Track 3: A story is told relating to the Black and Tans passed down to Eileen and John from their mother, Mary Patricia Willis, who came from Gorey, Co. Wexford. Eileen and John speak of their pride in their father’s activities during the 1916 Rising.
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Number of files: 2
File size(s): 10.91 MB, 25.28 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: John S. O’Connor (b. 1896), Tom Sheerin (b. 1896) and Frank Shouldice (b. 1882) John S. O’Connor (b. 1896), Tom Sheerin (b. 1896) and Frank Shouldice (b. 1882)
Interview location: Howth Road, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-082
Subject: O’Connor, John S.; Sheerin, Tom; and Shouldice, Frank (recording courtesy of the O’Connor family)
Recorded by: American Radio Station
Recording date: 1966
Length: 25:13
Track 1: John S. O’Connor recalls hearing the news that German arms had landed in Kerry, which proved to be untrue, and the building of barricades in Church Street and at Jameson’s Distillery early in Easter Week 1916. He also recalls the sound of the British Lancers riding their horses around the centre of the city at this time. The high morale of the Irish Volunteers in places such as Cork and Limerick prior to the Rising is also discussed. Track 2: Frank Shouldice recalls his experiences of Easter Week and explains that the sniping broke out on the Thursday, and on Friday night the great attack on North King Street began. He and his brother, Jack Shouldice, and Tom Sheerin and others, held out with their Enfield rifles until Saturday evening. Track 3: The three interviewees discuss the reasons for the Rising in 1916, and the dawning of the realisation that the Rising would fail. The surrender on Saturday of Easter Week, and the subsequent events, are discussed by the three interviewees. A discussion takes place about reading about the executions of the leaders of the Rising in a copy of the Irish Independent, handed to them by a British soldier.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 4.61 MB, 6.81 MB, 6.49 MB, 5.21 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: John S. O’Connor (b. 1896) John S. O’Connor (b. 1896)
Interview location: Howth Road, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-083
Subject: O’Connor, John S. (recording courtesy of the O’Connor family)
Recorded by: Seán MacRéamoinn
Recording date: 1966
Length: 24:03
Track 1: Contains details of the assembly of the First Battalion, under Edward (Ned) Daly, at Blackhall Place in Dublin on Easter Monday, 1916, at 12 noon. The erection of blockades on Church Street and at Jameson’s Distillery, using sacks of coal and grain, and also horse carts, is described. Track 2: The absence of confrontation with the British Army on the Tuesday of Easter Week is recalled, as is the attempted prevention of looting on that day. Wednesday morning again brought no confrontation with the British, and the men spent the day at Jameson’s Distillery, helping themselves to cigars and flagons of whiskey, which they sent to headquarters. They also ensured that the horses at Jameson’s were cared for. Track 3: The sniper fire which began on the Thursday is described by John S. O’Connor, and the decision by Ned Daly to redeploy some of his men to Fr. Mathew Hall and North King Street due to heavy firing there, is recalled. On the Friday, the wait for the confrontation with the British, which never materialised, is described. The events of the Saturday are recalled, when, not having heard about the surrender, Ned Daly got his men into the Four Courts building through an opening made in the wall of the shoe shop next door. Track 4: John S. O’Connor describes the surrender of his battalion, and he offers great praise to its leaders, including Ned Daly, Fionán Lynch and Jack Shouldice. After the surrender, the men were marched to The Rotunda, where they were kept outdoors overnight. This period is recalled, as is the march to Richmond Barracks early on the following morning. The later march to the North Wall is also described, along with the great uncertainty felt by the men as to their final destination.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 5.45 MB, 8.82 MB, 7.78 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Kitty Murphy (b. 1922) Kitty Murphy (b. 1922)
Interview location: Knocknagree, Co. Cork
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-084
Subject: O’Connor, Patrick (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 55:26
Track 1: The O’Connor family of Rathmore townland in Co. Kerry, is recalled by Kitty Murphy. Her Glenflesk grandmother Mary O’Donoghue’s republican idealism is discussed. Mary’s son, Patrick O’Connor, who took a position with the Civil Service in the post office in London, before returning to Ireland in 1915 to prepare for the Rising the following year, is also recalled. Patrick’s character, his passion and love of his country is also discussed. Track 2: A description is given of the tragedies which befell the O’Connor family in the days prior to the Rising. An excerpt is read from a letter which contains a detailed account of the events prior to the shooting of Patrick O’Connor during the attempted retreat from the GPO with The O’Rahilly. The reaction within the O’Connor family on hearing of Patrick’s death is described, as is the later targeting of the O’Connor home in Rathmore, Co. Kerry, by the Black and Tans. Track 3: Kitty Murphy describes the support of Fianna Fáil by her father, Danny O’Connor, during his lifetime. Track 4: The O’Connor family memorabilia is described and discussed and the insistance by Kitty’s grandmother not to accept the Government pension is explained. Also described is the strength and endurance of her grandmother, Mary O’Donoghue, who lost her husband and her two sons during one week in 1916. Kitty also recalls her own childhood years. Track 5: Mary O’Donoghue lived through the Famine in Ireland in the 1840s and her stories of that dreadful time are recalled by her granddaughter.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 8.98 MB, 13.38 MB, 5.86 MB, 12.17 MB, 10.42 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Marie Mulready (b. 1932) Marie Mulready (b. 1932)
Interview location: Stillorgan, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-085
Subject: O’Connor, Peter; Smith O’Connor, Annie, and O’Connor, Thomas (Interviewee’s father and grandparents respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 67:47
Track 1: Marie Mulready describes her paternal background, explaining that the family came from Harold’s Cross Road in Dublin and that her grandfather, Thomas O’Connor, and her father, Peter O’Connor, were both in the GPO in Easter Week 1916. The aftermath, as it affected the O’Connor family, is also described. Track 2: Former archivist at Kilmainham Jail, Niamh O’Sullivan, assists Marie Mulready in describing the bombing of the Four Courts in 1922. Marie recalls the character of her grandmother and her republican ideals, gleaned from her father’s stories. Track 3: Marie Mulready had ten siblings, and her childhood, living over the family grocery shop in Harold’s Cross, is described, as is her education, through Irish, along with some of her siblings. A copy of her father’s application for a State pension is displayed and its details are described. Track 4: Peter O’Connor’s involvement in the restoration of Kilmainham Jail, and the effect on him of the old building, is described by his daughter. Marie’s uncle, Jimmy Connolly, was recorded by Marie’s late brother, Tom O’Connor, as Jimmy discussed his eyewitness account of the Rising in Dublin. Part of this recording is included in this track. Track 5: Marie Mulready gives her views on her father’s involvement in the Rising as a 16 year old youth, and explains that an original copy of the 1916 Proclamation, together with her father’s rifle, were held in the O’Connor family home for many years. Tracks 6-7: Excerpts from a letter written by Marie’s father to his mother while he was in captivity in Hare Park at the Curragh in 1923 are read. The O’Connor family military medals are discussed and examined by Niamh O’Sullivan, former archivist at Kilmainham Jail.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 9.38 MB, 6.07 MB, 7.43 MB, 13.47 MB, 3.30 MB, 6.82 MB, 15.67 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Sr. Philomena O’Daly (b. 1935) Sr. Philomena O’Daly (b. 1935)
Interview location: Kylemore Road, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-086
Subject: O’Daly, Paddy (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 65:04
Track 1: Sr. Philomena O’Daly explains that she was the child of her father’s third marriage, and that her mother died ten months after her birth. She was cared for in Inchicore, Dublin, by close family friends, the Hollands. Track 2: Excerpts are read from the testimony of her father to the Bureau of Military History, detailing his entry to the IRB in 1907 to join his two older brothers, Séamus and Frank O’Daly. Séamus O’Daly’s grandson, Tony Roche, also presents the background to Paddy O’Daly’s involvement in, and his injury during, the 1916 Rising. He points out that both Daisy and Brigid, the first and second wives of Paddy O’Daly, had been in Cumann na mBan, and were out in 1916 with his grandmother Nora. Track 3: The injury inflicted on Paddy O’Daly during the Rising is discussed by Sr. Philomena, as is his involvement in the later escape from Mountjoy Jail. She also describes Paddy’s meeting with his son, Paddy, following his release from Frongoch Camp in December 1916, and she recalls the sadnesses her brother Paddy endured during his lifetime and the effects of the Civil War on the family. Track 4: Sr. Philomena O’Daly recalls visitors to the family home during her childhood, including people such as Joe Leonard (one of Collins’s Twelve Apostles/the Squad), Joe McGuinness and Richard Mulcahy (Minister for Defence in the Free State Government). The dislike of Éamon de Valera felt by the O’Daly family, the reasons for this, and their great support of Michael Collins, are recalled. Paddy O’Daly’s work as a carpenter in the Board of Works and the attendance at his funeral in 1957 are also recalled. Track 5: Sr. Philomena discusses her father’s involvement in events in Ballyseedy, Tralee, during the Civil War. Tony Roche states that no order was given by Minister for Defence, Richard Mulcahy, at that time. The effects of this event in Kerry on the wider O’Daly family are discussed. Track 6: A discussion follows regarding an RTÉ documentary on Ballyseedy, first shown in 1997. Track 7: The great pain felt by Paddy O’Daly Junior towards the end of his life is described. Track 8: Paddy O’Daly’s involvement in the Irish Army during the Emergency (1939-1945) is discussed. Track 9: Sr. Philomena recalls her decision to enter the Little Sisters of the Assumption at the age of 22, and her regret at having to lose contact with her family and friends.
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Number of files: 9
File size(s): 4.16 MB, 7.72 MB, 10.39 MB, 6.71 MB, 10.12 MB, 4.13 MB, 6.48 MB 3.61 MB 6.34 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Áine Caffrey (b. 1939) Áine Caffrey (b. 1939)
Interview location: Dalkey, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-087
Subject: O’Hanrahan, Michael (Interviewee’s great-granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 43:50
Track 1: Áine Caffrey (née Sweeney) explains her relationship to Michael O’Hanrahan, excecuted after the 1916 Rising. The Wexford and Carlow backgrounds to her O’Hanrahan family, and growing up with the awareness of her family’s important part in the Rising, are discussed. Track 2: Áine states the reasons why she feels that the people involved in the 1916 Rising did not generally discuss their experiences, comparing this to the hurt felt in the aftermath of the Irish Famine (1845-1852). Mention is made of her father, Alphonsus Sweeney, who was a runner for the Volunteers in Naas in 1916. She talks of growing up as a member of the O’Hanrahan family and her pride in the name is revealed. Track 3: The 1916 commemorations down through the years, the involvement of her family and the importance to her of the family memorabilia, are all discussed. Men who fought in the trenches during WWI are remembered, along with family members who were involved in the Rising. Tracks 4-5: Three generations of the O’Hanrahan family who fought for their country are discussed. A document received from the Military Archives, bearing the testimony of her father, is examined and discussed by Áine Caffrey, and she also details her family background. Her father Alphonsus Sweeney’s involvement in the antiquarian book trade and in auctioneering is also discussed.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 6.21 MB, 11.65 MB, 6.96 MB, 3.31 MB, 12.03 MB
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Interviewee: Iseult O’Malley (b. 1964) Iseult O’Malley (b. 1964)
Interview location: The Four Courts, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-088
Subject: O’Higgins, Kevin (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 29:09
Track 1: Iseult O’Malley discusses the 1916 period and the later election of her grandfather, Kevin O’Higgins, to the First Dáil. She also discusses O’Higgins` family influences which became evident during this time. Track 2: The signing of the Treaty is recalled, as is the organising by the Treaty Delegation of the purchase of a tea set as a wedding present for Kevin O’Higgins and his new bride in 1921. The establishment of an unarmed Garda force by Kevin O’Higgins, and his pride in this force, is discussed. Also spoken of are the executions of 77 republicans during the Civil War, while Kevin O’Higgins was Minister for Justice. His granddaughter discusses her feelings of the deep hurt and disappointment felt by many people as a result of the Civil War, a wound which she maintains is still not healed. Track 3: Kevin O’Higgins’s role in drafting the Irish Constitution is discussed and the decision to accept the advice of the British on the contents is also mentioned. Kevin O’Higgins helped to steer negotiations on the status of Ireland in the Commonwealth, and this is recalled. Track 4: Contains a discussion about the shooting of Iseult O’Malley’s great-grandfather, Thomas O’Higgins – four years before the shooting of his son, her grandfather, Kevin O’Higgins.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 4.93 MB, 4.61 MB, 5.70 MB, 11.50 MB
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Interviewee: Sr. Kevin O’Higgins (b. 1923) Sr. Kevin O’Higgins (b. 1923)
Interview location: Stillorgan, Co.Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-089
Subject: O’Higgins, Kevin (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 50:53
Track 1: Sr. Kevin (Maeve) O’Higgins describes her entry into the Carmelite Sisters in Blackrock in 1945 and she recalls, through the eyes of a child, a vivid memory of the day her father, Kevin O’Higgins, was shot in 1927. She also recalls the fact that she was placed in the care of her granduncle Tim Healy, first Governor-General of the Irish Free State, during the day of the funeral. During this recording, Sr. Mary Noeleen Slattery may also be heard. Track 2: The story of Sr. Kevin’s mother, Bridget Cole, a teacher from Dundrum in Dublin, is told. Her forgiveness of the assassins of her husband is recalled. An anecdote relating to an event during Sr. Kevin’s childhood involving her father is told. The shooting of her grandfather, Thomas Higgins, and the bravery of his daughter, Patricia, at that time is described, as is the effect of this shooting on Kevin O’Higgins. Track 3: The support of the O’Higgins family by the Irish Government following the death of Kevin O’Higgins is discussed. A photograph taken at the wedding of her parents at Whitefriars Street is examined, and mention is made of the wedding party on that occasion, which included bestman, Rory O’Connor. Her views on the executions during the Civil War are detailed. The demeanour and personality of her mother, Bridget, and the initial meeting of her parents while her father was on the run during the War of Independence, are described. Track 4: Childhood memories of a visit to Dublin Zoo with her father are described, and the artist, Sarah Purser, who painted a portrait of her mother, Bridget Cole, is also recalled. Track 5: Sr. Kevin recalls visits made to her by various interesting people at the enclosed Carmelite convent in Blackrock over the years. She recites the poem “I Vow to Thee my Country,” written by Cecil Spring Rice. Track 6: Contains a description of her mother Bridget’s premonition of the death of Michael Collins, and a discussion about Sr. Kevin’s feelings regarding Éamon de Valera.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 8.13 MB, 8.55 MB, 10.99 MB, 7.12 MB, 5.79 MB, 6.07 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Patrick O’Byrne (b. 1948) Patrick O’Byrne (b. 1948)
Interview location: Phibsboro, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-090
Subject: O’Keeffe, Pádraig (Páidín) (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 40:16
Track 1: Patrick O’Byrne describes the background to the O’Keeffe family of Nohoval in north Cork, his grandfather, Páidín O’Keeffe’s republican ideals and his political career. Also discussed are the recorded conversations between his grandfather and Richard Mulcahy, compiled in the 1960s. (These recordings have been included in this Irish Life and Lore 1916 Oral History Collection.) Track 2: During the week of the Rising, Páidín O’Keeffe was in Clerys in Sackville Street. The events of the week, his subsequent arrest, the sharing of rations by British soldiers and his deportation to Frongoch Camp in North Wales, are described. The 1966 Commemorations are recalled, and the initial reluctance of Páidín O’Keeffe and his daughter, Eithne O’Byrne (née O’Keeffe) to participate, is explained. Track 3: Patrick O’Byrne thinks that it is possible that Páidín O’Keeffe was introduced to the IRB by John Wyse Power of Waterford, who was the brother of his future wife, Cáit de Paor. During the Civil War, Páidín O’Keeffe was Assistant Military Governor at Mountjoy Jail, having previously been a prisoner there in 1919. Mention is made of concerns held by Pádín and his sister-in-law, Jennie Wyse Power, in relation to the Sinn Féin Funds Case. Eithne O’Byrne related this to her son Patrick O’Byrne. Track 4: Patrick O’Byrne does not remember any mention of his grandfather’s role in the 1916 Rising during his schooldays at CBS, Synge Street in Dublin. There were some references to the executed leaders, in 1966, but he does not recall the details. He kept his head down as he did not want to draw attention to himself, but he was very aware of his grandfather’s role. Track 5: Contains a description of the recordings compiled by “The General” Richard Mulcahy in 1964, which include a narrative on the character of Cathal Brugha, a description of the meeting in the home of Dr. O’Kelly on the eve of the Rising, and the execution of Erskine Childers during the Civil War, as told by Frank Holland.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 6.53 MB, 9.10 MB, 10.88 MB, 3.42 MB, 7.00 MB
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Interviewee: Pádraig (Páidín) O’Keeffe (b. 1881) and Richard Mulcahy (b. 1886), Part 1 Pádraig (Páidín) O’Keeffe (b. 1881) and Richard Mulcahy (b. 1886), Part 1
Interview location: Rathmines, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-091
Subject: O’Keeffe, Pádraig (Páidín) and Mulcahy, Richard (recording courtesy of Patrick O’Byrne)
Recorded by: Richard Mulcahy
Recording date: 1964
Length: 22:57
Track 1: Pádraig (Páidín) O’Keeffe explains that he worked as a Post Office clerk in the British Civil Service in London in his youth, having grown up in Nohovaldaly in North Cork. In 1889, he began to read the United Irishman, while still at school. He says that the publication of the United Irishman was the catalyst for the Irish republican movement, prior to the formation of the Gaelic League. Richard Mulcahy explains that, but for his meeting with Seán MacDiarmada on the way into Dublin on one of the days prior to the Rising, he would not have known of any plans. Páidín O’Keeffe explains that he had a similar experience, having met Arthur Griffith. Richard Mulcahy, who was First Lieutenant in C Company, describes the preparations for the Rising at No. 2 Dawson Street, a week prior to Easter Monday 1916. Mulcahy also recounts the instructions from P. H. Pearse, and Con Colbert’s reservations about starting a Rising on Easter Sunday – a Holy day. Track 2: Pádín O’Keeffe describes his acquaintance with Diarmuid Lynch. Richard Mulcahy explains his orders to destroy the telegraphic communications around Dublin, and to London, prior to the Rising. He describes his chance meeting with Tomás Ashe on Monday afternoon, and subsequently remaining with Ashe and his men. O’Keeffe and Mulcahy discuss their dislike of Éamon de Valera, and the conduct of the Irish Delegation to the Treaty negotiations in London in 1921.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 3.72 MB, 5.03 MB, 7.26 MB
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Interviewee: Pádraig (Páidín) O’Keeffe (b. 1881) and Richard Mulcahy (b. 1886), Part 2 Pádraig (Páidín) O’Keeffe (b. 1881) and Richard Mulcahy (b. 1886), Part 2
Interview location: Rathhmines, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-092
Subject: O’Keeffe, Pádraig (Páidín) and Mulcahy, Richard (recording courtesy of Patrick O’Byrne)
Recorded by: Richard Mulcahy
Recording date: 1964
Length: 17:27
Track 1: Contains a description, by Páidín O’Keeffe, of the respect felt by Irish country Volunteers for Michael Collins. Richard Mulcahy recalls his position as Chief of Staff of the Irish Volunteers at the time of the Truce, and his sacking by Cathal Brugha, on two occasions. He also recalls a comment by Michael Collins relating to the aftermath of the Truce. Track 2: Páidín O’Keeffe discusses some individuals in political life in the period following the First Dáil, and their activities. Track 3: Páidín O’Keeffe discusses his own membership of the First Dáil and his General Secretaryship of Sinn Féin from 1917-1922. He also describes his instructions to Jack Sheehan to travel on a fundraising trip to Scotland at this time, which proved to be very successful.
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Number of files: 2
File size(s): 12.68 MB, 8.35 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Pádraig (Páidín) O’Keeffe (b. 1881) Pádraig (Páidín) O’Keeffe (b. 1881)
Interview location: Rathhmines, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-093
Subject: O’Keeffe, Pádraig (Páidín) (recording courtesy of Patrick O’Byrne)
Recorded by: Richard Mulcahy
Recording date: 1964
Length: 61:39
Track 1: Páidín O’Keeffe describes meeting Arthur Griffith in Paddy Gleeson’s drapery shop in O’Connell Street, Dublin, on Holy Saturday of Easter Week. He was told to attend a meeting of leaders of the Irish Volunteers at the home of Dr. Séamus O’Kelly in Rathgar that night. Having told his wife and family, he left home and when the meeting began, he was instructed to go and get Cathal Brugha, who was not in attendance. He was also instructed to deliver a dispatch to de Valera, which he later gave to Simon Donnelly with instructions to hand it to de Valera. Track 2: Contains a description of Páidín O’Keeffe’s order from Eoin MacNeill to cycle to the offices of the Sunday Independent that night, to alert the staff there of an important notice to be delivered before 3 a.m. on Sunday morning by Eoin MacNeill. Details are provided about meeting journalist Fred Cogley who agreed to delay printing until 3 a.m. Mention is made of his good friend, Pat O’Connor from Rathmore, Co. Kerry, who sent word to him that he would be coming to Dublin to take part in the Rising. On Good Friday, Páidín O’Keeffe, Pat O’Connor and some others met a journalist from Listowel named O’Sullivan, who told them that a wire had come from Tralee to say the Aud and her shipment of arms had been captured. O’Keeffe explains that O’Sullivan was anxious to meet Piaras Beaslaí so that this information could be publicised. Track 3: Contains a further discussion on the meeting of the leaders of the Irish Volunteers on the Saturday night at Dr. O’Kelly’s house, and a description is provided of the feeling of excitement at the prospect of an imminent Rising, though a lot of confusion still reigned. A detailed account of a second gun-running incident on the coastline at Kilcoole in Co. Wicklow, is provided. Track 4: An account is given of hearing the first shots of the Rising being fired, while Páidín was walking with his friend, Thomas Shine Cuffe, in the golf course in Churchtown on Easter Monday morning. Páidín O’Keeffe travelled to the GPO with Séan Hales and was instructed to go to Clearys, where he came under the command of W. J. Brennan-Whitmore. The surrender at the end of the Rising is recalled by Páidín O’Keeffe, along with his capture and the subsequent march to the Rotunda grounds, where they spent the night. He mentions that the British military shared their rations with their prisoners that night. The march to Richmond Barracks on the following morning is described. The subsequent arrival there of Richard Mulcahy, Tomás Ashe and Jim and Frank Lawless, is recalled. The later march to the North Wall is also recounted. Track 5: Contains a discussion on Arthur Griffith, his brief membership of the IRB and the antipathy towards him within that organisation. A brief discussion on Cork republicans follows. Páidín recalls a meeting with Liam Deasy while Deasy was awaiting execution at Mountjoy and he himself was the Assistant Military Governor. Track 6: Páidín O’Keeffe recalls his first meeting with P. H. Pearse in London in 1902, at a Cumann na nGaedheal meeting. He also met North Kerrymen Mick, Paddy and Jack Mulvihill in London at this time, and he describes them as being very bright and intelligent men.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 8.87 MB, 8.80 MB, 15.10 MB, 11.51 MB, 4.78 MB, 7.44 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Con O’Neill (b. 1936) Con O’Neill (b. 1936)
Interview location: The National Library of Ireland, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-094
Subject: O’Neill, Laurence and Gibney, May (Interviewee’s parents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 56:25
Track 1: The Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, background of the O’Neill family, Laurence O’Neill’s apprenticeship as a coach-builder there, his joining of the Irish Volunteers in 1913, and his activities prior to Easter Week 1916, are all discussed by Con O’Neill. The Gibney family of Co. Meath, Con’s maternal grandfather’s service with the RIC in Tralee, and the family’s move to Temple Street in Dublin following his death, are also discussed. Con describes his mother’s walk from Temple Street to the nearby GPO at the beginning of Easter Week 1916, where she remained until the surrender. Track 2: Contains a description by Con O’Neill of his father, Laurence O’Neill, in Carlow during the War of Independence and the Civil War, including details of his shooting and wounding during a fire fight with a combined British Army and Black and Tan force. His father’s incarceration in Mountjoy Jail and then in Dartmoor is also described. Track 3: Con O’Neill recalls his mother, May Gibney, her part in the work of Cumann na mBan in the years following the 1916 Rising and her incarceration in Kilmainham Jail. Also described is the meeting of his parents in Carlow, and their subsequent marriage. Tracks 4-5: The disappointment felt by his parents at the outcome of the Treaty, and the loss of the Six Counties, is discussed by Con O’Neill. He recalls the 1966 Commemorations and the pride he felt at the awarding of the Commemorative Medal to his mother at that time. He also discusses the great efforts of his mother, May Gibney, in the Cumann na mBan Benevolent Society, as she worked, for very many years, for the welfare of her comrades after the 1916-1923 period. He recounts how his father, Laurence O’Neill, joined the Irish Army at the outbreak of WWII.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 10.67 MB, 10.81 MB, 5.67 MB, 6.27 MB, 18.30 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Proinsias Ó Rathaille (b. 1949) Proinsias Ó Rathaille (b. 1949)
Interview location: National Library of Ireland, Dublin.
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-095
Subject: O’Rahilly, Michael Joseph (The O’Rahilly) (Interviewee’s grandfather)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 53:26
Track 1: Proinsias Ó Rathaille describes his father Niall Ó Rathaille’s early life, his time in America and his return to set up his medical practice in Herbert Park in Dublin, in the O’Rahilly home where Proinsias was born. He provides his own views on events of the weeks before the Rising in 1916. Track 2: Proinsias describes the responsibilities of his grandfather, Michael Joseph O’Rahilly (The O’Rahilly) in the GPO during Easter Week. He also recounts the attempted retreat from the GPO, and the shooting and death of The O’Rahilly in Sackville Lane. The note he wrote to his wife, Nancy, as he lay dying is also detailed. Track 3: Michael Joseph O’Rahilly’s Kerry connections and the home he built in Ventry, still used by the family, are described, as also is Dillon Lodge in the Dublin Mountains. This was a present given to Proinsias’s mother, Bridie, by Joe McGrath. Track 4: The O’Rahilly family’s response to the death of The O’Rahilly and their political stance over the years are explored. Track 5: Proinsias Ó Rathaille recalls his mother, Bridie Clyne, originally from Leitrim, who was involved in the 1916-1923 period. Bridie was on hunger strike in Kilmainham in 1923 under the alias Annie Hardwicke, along with her friends, Sighle Humphreys and Elgin Barry, who later married a member of the O’Rahilly family. The O’Rahilly family memorabilia and military medals are examined and discussed.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 11.47 MB, 8.77 MB, 7.48 MB, 5.90 MB, 15.35 MB
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Interviewee: Eda Sagarra (b. 1933) Eda Sagarra (b. 1933)
Interview location: Rathgar, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-096
Subject: O’Shiel, Kevin (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 46:54
Track 1: The Omagh, Co. Tyrone, background to the O’Shiel family, Kevin O’Shiel’s education in England and his career at the Bar, are outlined by Eda Sagarra, as is his membership of Sinn Féin and the Irish Nation League. His writing for several Sinn Féin newspapers and his letters to the Irish Independent are also discussed. His brief membership of the Irish Volunteers is recalled. Track 2: In Omagh, Kevin O’Shiel began a publicity campaign against conscription in 1918, and this is discussed. Track 3: Eda Sagarra outlines the activities of her father, who was a member of the Standing Committee of Sinn Féin, following the arrest of many of the leaders as a consequence of the “German Plot” in 1918. Kevin O’Shiel became Special Commissioner for the Sinn Féin Courts in 1920. He acted for Countess Markievicz during one case. Track 4: The conducting of cases before the Sinn Féin Courts is described, as is the enormous amount of work involved, the large number of cases settled, and the location of these Courts. Possible intimidation, and fear of raids and/or attack on the Courts is also explored. Track 5: Eda Sagarra speaks of the signing of the Treaty. Kevin O’Shiel’s convictions at this time are explained – he took the Treaty side. His daughter explains that he was very reluctant to ever discuss the events of the Civil War. Kevin O’Shiel became a Director of the North Eastern Boundary Bureau in September 1922. The death of Michael Collins in 1922 is discussed, as is its effect on his great friend, Kevin O’Shiel, who had acted for him in the North. The gift sent to Kevin O’Shiel by Seán Collins, brother of Michael Collins, and its present location, is described. Track 6: Eda Sagarra discusses her father’s first marriage to Miss Montgomery on the day following the shooting of Collins, the death of his wife, and his second marriage to Miss Smiddy, Eda’s mother. Her father’s contact with his comrades of earlier turbulent days later in his life is recalled, as is his anger at much of what he regarded as de Valera’s self-seeking politics. The writing of Kevin O’Shiel’s memoir in the 1960s is also discussed.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 5.60 MB, 6.83 MB, 6.18 MB, 5.06 MB, 7.26 MB, 12.04 MB
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Interviewee: Laura O’Sullivan (b. 1924) Laura O’Sullivan (b. 1924)
Interview location: Limerick City.
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-097
Subject: O’Sullivan, James and Daly, Laura (Interviewee’s parents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 68:00
Track 1: Laura O’Sullivan recalls the close friendship between her father, James O’Sullivan, and her uncle, Ned Daly, who was executed after the 1916 Rising. She recalls the circumstances which led to her parents’ initial meeting, and their marriage. She gives an account of the events of the week of the Rising and the subsequent arrests of her father and her uncle. Track 2: Laura O’Sullivan describes the trip to Dublin made by her mother, Laura Daly, and her sister Madge in the immediate aftermath of the Rising. They met in Dublin with another sister, Kathleen, wife of Thomas Clarke, and the sisters’ subsequent farewell visit to Kilmainham Jail is discussed. A cousin of the interviewee, Mairéad Dore, is present and she describes the visits to Kilmainham on two occasions, first prior to the death of Thomas Clarke and subsequently prior to the death of Ned Daly. Track 3: The personality of Tom Clarke is described, particularly his sense of humour and good nature, and his deep friendship with Thomas MacDonagh. Track 4: Laura O’Sullivan’s granduncle, John Daly, is recalled and his inspiring passion for Irish freedom is described, as are the visits by Tom Clarke to the Daly home prior to his marriage to Kathleen Daly. Track 5: Contains an explanation of the fact that Tom Clarke was the first signatory to the 1916 Proclamation, abiding by Thomas MacDonagh’s wish. Laura’s memories of canvassing with her father in Limerick during mayoral elections are recalled, as are the family’s feelings towards Éamon de Valera. The three Clarke children, John (known as Daly), Tom and Emmet, were brought from Dublin to the Daly home in Limerick to be reared, and Laura O’Sullivan discusses their lives. Tracks 6-7: Hand written notes by Laura’s father, James O’Sullivan, which include mentions of Michael Collins, are discussed. Further detail is provided of the visit of her mother and her mother’s sister to Dublin after the Rising, together with their impressions at that time.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 8.22 MB, 11.01 MB, 7.12 MB, 3.93 MB, 3.18 MB, 21.36 MB, 7.50 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Edward Daly O’Sullivan (b. 1919) Edward Daly O’Sullivan (b. 1919)
Interview location: Limerick City
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-098
Subject: O’Sullivan, James and the Daly Sisters (Interviewee’s father and aunts)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 48:23
Track 1: Edward Daly O’Sullivan recalls his early memories of life in Limerick city where his father, James O’Sullivan, was the manager of the Bakehouse. He describes his father’s background. The prison sentences served by his uncle, John Daly, and his brother-in-law Thomas Clarke, in Fenian times, are recalled. Track 2: The involvement of his father in the funeral of O’Donovan Rossa in 1915 is described, as is his mother Laura Daly’s journey to Dublin in the immediate aftermath of the surrender in 1916. The harassment of the Daly family by the Black and Tans in Limerick is also recalled. Track 3: The eldest Daly sister, Madge, the business woman of the family who supported her uncle, John Daly, is recalled. Edward also recalled his childhood and youth shared with the Clarke children in Limerick, and the strong republican beliefs of his parents. Track 4: Edward Daly O’Sullivan discusses his own working life and the support given to him by his aunt, Madge Daly, in his business affairs. Track 5: As young men, Edward and his brother, Seán, joined the IRA because of their strong republican background. This, and their later leaving of the organisation, is discussed. Edward further discusses the monument at Sarsfield Bridge in Limerick and explains its importance to him. His mother’s views on P. H. Pearse are detailed and his visits to the Mansion House in Dublin, during the tenure of his aunt, Kathleen Clarke, as Lord Mayor, are remembered. Track 6: The family memorabilia is described and its importance to the family is emphasised.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 6.24 MB, 6.81 MB, 14.00 MB, 4.34 MB, 9.76 MB, 3.19 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Alf MacLochlainn (b. 1926) Alf MacLochlainn (b. 1926)
Interview location: Salthill, Galway
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-099
Subject: Pearse, P. H. (Interviewee’s half-granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 25:00
Track 1: Alf MacLochlainn explains his relationship to P. H. Pearse and William Pearse: his grandmother was Emily Pearse, half-sister of the Pearse brothers who were executed after the 1916 Rising. Alf recalls his grandmother Emily’s personality and demeanour and the assistance provided by the White Cross following the death of his photographer father, Alfred MacLochlainn, while Alf was in his infancy. The awareness of the historical family connection, and its importance to them is described. Track 2: Alf MacLochlainn’s mother was Marcella Dowling. Alf explains that her brothers, Frank, Seán and Michael, were involved in the 1916-1923 period. A fascinating story is told about an occasion when Alf MacLochlainn was employed by the National Library of Ireland and a draft of the surrender at the end of the Rising, handwritten on cardboard by P. H. Pearse, was brought to him for inspection. This is now on display in the library. Track 3: The fact that the gates to Leinster House in Kildare Street, Dublin, were manufactured by the MacLochlainn foundry in Pearse Street, is mentioned, as are the details of Alf’s brother Pearse’s involvement in the 1966 Commemorations and in the conversion of Kilmainham Jail into a museum. Alf declares himself to be a “left-wing socialist” and a good friend of President Michael D. Higgins. He recalls his two older siblings, Pearse and Jimmy, and their involvement in Fianna Éireann in their youth.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 5.67 MB, 8.37 MB, 9.15 MB
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Interviewee: Noel Scarlett (b. 1928) Noel Scarlett (b. 1928)
Interview location: Glasnevin, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-100
Subject: Pearse, P. H. (Interviewee’s half granduncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 36:13
Track 1: The Scarlett family connection to the Pearse family is described: Noel Scarlett’s mother was Florence Pearse, daughter of James Vincent Pearse and grand-daughter of James Pearse Senior, who was the father of P. H. Pearse. Florence Pearse’s marriage to William Scarlett, who joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, fought in WWI and later joined the Irish Army, is described. The importance of the family connection to P. H. Pearse is explored, as is Noel’s father’s service in WWI with the British Army. Track 2: Noel Scarlett’s mother Florence’s siblings and their lives are recalled, and he is assisted in this by his son, Ciaran Scarlett. Noel recalls the kindness of Margaret Pearse, sister of P. H. Pearse, and the holidays spent at St. Enda’s during his childhood. An explanation is given on the family relationships; to Noel’s great-grandfather, James Pearse Senior, who married twice: James and Emily were children of the first marriage, and P. H. and William Pearse (and their two sisters) were children of the second marriage. James Pearse Senior was a stonemason who came to Dublin from Birmingham with his family and set up his business in the 1850s. Track 3: Noel Scarlett describes his experiences in the FCA (the Irish Army Reserve) in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, the responsibility of the Pearse family connection, and the lack of an official Irish recognition of that connection. The family memorabilia is discussed and the equal importance to him of his father’s British Army memorabilia is emphasised. Track 4: The accommodation provided by Margaret Pearse to the young Scarlett couple on their marriage in the 1950s is described, as is the family resemblance, and the eye defect shared by P. H. Pearse and Noel Scarlett’s grand-aunt and godmother, Margaret Pearse. The 1966 Commemorations are recalled, during which the interviewee was a corporal in the Presidential Guard.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 7.26 MB, 10.66 MB, 6.83 MB, 8.45 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Count Eoghan Peter Plunkett (b. 1929) Count Eoghan Peter Plunkett (b. 1929)
Interview location: Dundalk, Co. Louth
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-101
Subject: Plunkett family
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 76:30
Track 1: Eoghan Peter Plunkett was born in 1929, not long after Kevin O’Higgins was shot, a shooting of which his father, George Plunkett, was accused. The great distress caused to his mother at that time and also her ill health following the death of his father in 1944, is discussed. Eoghan speaks of his grandfather, George Noble Plunkett, who had a great interest in the arts and who was created a Papal Count in 1884. Track 2: The women of the Plunkett family are recalled, and details of Grace Plunkett (née Gifford), who married Joseph Mary Plunkett just prior to his execution, are provided. The wonderful library collected by George Noble Plunkett, a library now sadly lost to the family, is discussed, as is the character of Count Plunkett’s father, George, and his connection with John J. O’Kelly (‘Sceilg’). Track 3: A discussion follows on Joseph Mary Plunkett’s execution and its legacy in relation to the Plunkett family and the Plunkett name. Track 4: Count Plunkett’s introduction to Éamon de Valera on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the Irish Press is discussed. Track 5: The Civil War is recalled, along with the repercussions which may still be felt. The wider Plunkett family is described, and Count Eoghan Plunkett’s father’s decision to leave the IRA is recalled. Tracks 6-7: The bitterness felt by the Plunkett family following the execution of Joseph Mary Plunkett is discussed, and the death sentences imposed on his two brothers, George and Jack, are recalled. Count Eoghan Plunkett gives his views on the 1966 Commemorations and the material published at that time. His first visit to Kilmainham Jail, together with his response, is described, and two members of the IRA are recalled – Jim Donovan and Seán Russell. Tracks 8-9: The revolutionary zeal of the Plunkett family in former times, and its origins, are explored. The great book collection owned by the family, the death of Eoghan’s elder brother, and his mother’s suffering following his father’s death, are recalled. The assistance provided by his uncle, Jack Plunkett, and by his maternal McCarthy family from Dunmanway, Co. Cork are described. Eoghan mentions his mother’s membership of Cumman na mBan prior to her marriage, and the fact that she shared a flat in Dublin with two other members of the organisation, while Michael Collins simultaneously occupied another part of the house during the War of Independence.
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Number of files: 9
File size(s): 7.58 MB, 5.44 MB, 5.97 MB, 4.78 MB, 9.98 MB, 12.18 MB, 11.62 MB, 6.10 MB, 6.49 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Seóirse Plunkett (b. 1933) Seóirse Plunkett (b. 1933)
Interview location: Donnybrook, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-102
Subject: Plunkett, George and Plunkett, Joseph Mary (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 65:10
Track 1: Seóirse Plunkett lives in Marlborough Road in Dublin, the same street on which his maternal grandmother’s home was situated, and a street where Joseph Plunkett lived prior to his execution. Seóirse describes his father, George Plunkett’s leadership of his men as they marched up Sackville Street to the GPO at Easter 1916. He also discusses his father’s death sentence, later commuted. Seóirse’s uncle, Joseph Plunkett, engineered the plans for the Rising, and this is discussed. Track 2: Seóirse recounts some stories about 1916 and the years to 1923, passed down to him by his mother, Corkwoman Mary McCarthy; a member of Cumann na mBan who shared a house with Michael Collins and others during the War of Independence. Seóirse also recalls his uncle Joseph Plunkett’s great interest in wireless and he provides details of an important message broadcast in 1916. Track 3: The various homes the Plunkett family occupied after the Rising and the visitors there are recalled, including George Gilmore. Whistles given to the Plunkett children by their father to be used for the warning of unwelcome visitors to their home in the 1940s are recalled, as is Seóirse’s story of his father’s signing of a Declaration of War against the British in 1939. Track 4: Seóirse Plunkett’s uncle Jack Plunkett, whose health suffered as a result of his hunger strike, is recalled. The decline of the Plunkett family fortunes is also discussed. Track 5: Contains details of Seóirse Plunkett’s education, of being on the “wrong side” of the political divide and the difficulties encountered by the family in making a living. Track 6: Seóirse’s views on the stand taken by his family in former times are set out; the fact that his father was on the run or imprisoned for many years, the sacrifices made by his mother, the non-acceptance of military medals by the Plunkett family. The family papers and records are all discussed. Track 7: Seóirse recalls the Civil War and his uncle Jack Plunkett’s part in the occupation of the Four Courts.
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Number of files: 7
File size(s): 9.66 MB, 9.37 MB, 5.05 MB, 7.89 MB, 5.27 MB, 14.33 MB, 8.17 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Micheline Sheehy Skeffington (b. 1953) Micheline Sheehy Skeffington (b. 1953)
Interview location: Clarinbridge, Co. Galway
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-103
Subject: Sheehy Skeffington, Francis and Sheehy Skeffington, Hanna (Interviewee’s grandparents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 63:47
Track 1: Micheline Sheehy Skeffington describes the fundraising trips to America made by Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, the first in December 1916-June 1918, when she was accompanied by her son Owen, then aged 7. The early life of Micheline’s grandfather, Francis Sheehy Skeffington, as a journalist and educator, is also recalled. Track 2: The reasons why Micheline’s grandparents decided that they would be named “Sheehy Skeffington” and the importance of the name itself is explained. An anecdote is told about Hanna, who was a suffragette and a demonstrator. The initial support of Home Rule by her grandparents, (abandoned c. 1911), their pacifist beliefs at that time, and an event during Easter Week 1916 when her grandfather attempted to save the life of a British soldier, are discussed. Micheline explains that his pacifism involved an abhorrence of death in others, not his own. Track 3: The arrest of Frank Sheehy Skeffington by Captain Bowen-Colthurst and Frank being summarily shot by the Captain at Portobello Barracks are recalled, as is the offer of compensation by the British Government to his widow, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, which she refused. Track 4: Contains a discussion on the passion and drive of Hanna Sheehy Skeffington in her efforts to be allowed into the United States to raise awareness of the Irish fight for freedom (a ‘small nation’ being ignored by the great powers involved in WWI to save ‘small nations’ e.g. Belgium). Her work behind the scenes at the outbreak of the Civil War, in an attempt to halt the conflict, is also discussed. Track 5: Fr. Eugene Sheehy, an uncle of Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, was involved in the Land League. He is recalled by his relative Micheline, who inherited the desk he gave to Hanna to encourage her to study. Her father Owen Sheehy Skeffington’s education in the United States is described. Track 6: Family papers and memorabilia are discussed, as is the Government pension awarded following the Civil War. Micheline reflects on the legacy handed down to her and her feelings of responsibility to that legacy.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 7.02 MB, 13.40 MB, 8.22 MB, 11.53 MB, 10.16 MB, 8.14 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Mary Johnson (b. 1930) Mary Johnson (b. 1930)
Interview location: Blennerville, Tralee, Co. Kerry
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-104
Subject: Shortis, Paddy (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2012
Length: 42:40
Track 1: Mary Johnson discusses her Shortis uncles and aunts of Ballybunion, Co. Kerry, her own childhood days in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick and Tralee, Co. Kerry, and her mother, Annie, who ran the public house business in Ballybunion. The great fear of tuberculosis which prevailed in Ireland in earlier days is also described. Track 2: Contains a description of the views of Mary’s mother at the way in which Ireland was being governed later in the 20th century, bearing in mind the enormous sacrifice made by her brother, Paddy Shortis, in 1916. Track 3: The appointment of Mary Johnson’s father, Richard Johnson, to the position of District Judge by Kevin O’Higgins in 1923 is recalled. Stories of threats to Richard Johnson’s life are recounted, as are some of the cases in which he was involved. His work as a playwright is also mentioned. Track 4: Richard Johnson’s involvement in the Sinn Féin Courts in Co. Limerick, prior to his appointment as a District Judge, is described. The attempted burning of Ballyard House, Tralee, owned by the Leeson family, by the IRA in 1926, and the restoration carried out by her parents when they later occupied the house, is recalled by Mary Johnson. Mention is also made of an O’Donnell man from Tralee who allegedly sent a radio message relaying instructions to the Volunteers who tragically drowned at Ballykissane Pier at Killorglin, Co. Kerry, in 1916.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 13.60 MB, 7.47 MB, 5.32 MB, 12.71 MB
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Interviewee: Richard Johnson (b. 1939) Richard Johnson (b. 1939)
Interview location: Ballsbridge, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-105
Subject: Shortis, Paddy (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 32:41
Track 1: Richard Johnson outlines the background to the Shortis family business in Ballybunion, Co. Kerry. He explains that as a young man, his uncle Paddy Shortis, joined the British Civil Service and worked with the post office in London, while Paddy’s two brothers, Archie and Arnold, emigrated to America. Another brother, Bill, who remained in Kerry, became active in the Civil War. Track 2: Richard Johnson recalls his father Richard, who was involved in the Sinn Féin Courts during the War of Independence. He further recalls the Shortis public house business in Ballybunion and the fact that both his grandparents died in their thirties, leaving their children to be cared for by their aunts. He also discusses his views on events during the 1916-1923 period, and the breaking down of law and order in Ireland. Track 3: Richard Johnson details events involving his father, Richard, in the aftermath of the 1916 Rising, when he was asked by the O’Rahilly family to search for the body of The O’Rahilly. While doing so, he discovered the body of Paddy Shortis in the morgue. Some years later Richard Johnson Senior married the younger sister of Paddy Shortis. Track 4: The connections between the Barry, Shortis and O’Rahilly families are discussed, as also is the career of Richard Johnson Senior as a District Court judge in Kerry. Track 5: The Treaty, Partition in Ireland, and the arrest of Roger Casement near Tralee in 1916, are discussed. Richard Johnson mentions that he was personally acquainted with the county surgeon, Dr. Michael Shanahan, who had attended Casement in the RIC barracks in Tralee following his arrest.
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 5.71 MB, 9.09 MB, 5.38 MB, 6.59 MB, 3.22 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
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Interviewee: Chris Shouldice (b. 1931), Part 1 Chris Shouldice (b. 1931), Part 1
Interview location: Knocklyon Castle, Templeogue, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-106
Subject: Shouldice, Jack and Shouldice, Frank (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 68:24
Track 1: The Palatine background of the Shouldice family is described, as is the introduction of Jack Shouldice into the IRB in England by Sam Maguire, after whom the famous GAA cup is named. The involvement of Jack Shouldice with the Gaelic League and with the Gaelic Athletic Association is explained. Track 2: Contains a discussion on the escape plan put in place should the 1916 Rising in Dublin fail, and Chris Shouldice’s father Jack’s respect for John Redmond as a man. Track 3: Jack Shouldice fought in North King Street during the Rising and his brother, Frank, was a sniper on the roof of Jameson’s Distillery. In the years following the 1916 Rising, Jack Shouldice would meet his comrades from the conflict at Meagher’s Pub in Richmond Road after Sunday GAA matches, to discuss their memories of the Rising and the War of Independence. Chris Shouldice recalls these Sunday afternoons. His father’s sentence of death after the Rising, its subsequent commuting, and his imprisonment in Dartmoor and Lewes Jails are recalled. Tracks 4-5: Jack Shouldice’s written evidence to the Bureau of Military History in 1947 is discussed. Jack’s less than positive impression of Éamon de Valera as a military leader, his memories of P. H. Pearse and of Thomas Clarke, who was his idol, are described, as is his part in the preparation for the Rising. Track 6: Memories of the funeral of Jack Shouldice in 1965, and the attendance of people from both Treaty and anti-Treaty backgrounds is recalled. Jack Shouldice’s involvement as a Justice in the Sinn Féin Courts is described, as is his later work in administration with the GAA. His decision following the signing of the Treaty to take no part in the ensuing conflict is discussed. Track 7: Contains a discussion on Chris Shouldice’s own education and the reaction of his schoolmates to stories about those involved in the 1916 Rising. An anecdote told to him by his father about keeping the bakeries operating during Easter Week 1916 is recounted. Track 8: Chris Shouldice is the proud owner of the captain’s table from the Helga (later the Muirchú) and he describes how he came to acquire this interesting piece. (Helga was a British ship which fired 24 rounds at Liberty Hall, headquarters of the Irish Citizen Army, and further rounds at various occupied positions in Dublin during the 1916 Rising.) Chris details his father’s career as Secretary of the GAA Leinster Council from 1917 to 1927, and subsequently in the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.
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Number of files: 8
File size(s): 8.75 MB, 6.16 MB, 6.35 MB, 4.47 MB, 6.64 MB, 11.74 MB, 8.30 MB 10.30 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Chris Shouldice (b. 1931), Part 2 Chris Shouldice (b. 1931), Part 2
Interview location: Knocklyon Castle, Templeogue, Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-107
Subject: Shouldice, Jack (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 66:00
Track 1: The feelings of Jack Shouldice in later life, with regard to the concept of being European, following his very active role in nationalism in Ireland, are explored. His involvement as a Justice in the Sinn Féin Courts, his membership of the Gaelic League and of the Irish Volunteers, along with being secretary of the GAA, is discussed. Track 2: The Celtic Revival, which touched every area of life in Ireland in the early part of the 20th century, and Jack Shouldice’s great interest in this movement, is recalled by his son. Track 3: Jack Shouldice was elected as First Lieutenant in F Company, 1st Battalion, and was positioned in North King Street during the Rising, where savage fighting occurred. Chris Shouldice recalls his father’s assertion that the success of this engagement resulted partly from the training undertaken by the Volunteers in the same area prior to the Rising. Jack Shouldice’s court martial and death sentence is discussed, as is his location in a cell adjoining that of Éamon de Valera in Kilmainham Jail. Also recalled is the handshake between Frank Shouldice and Michael Mallin, prior to the latter’s execution. Track 4: Contains a discussion on the high principles of the people involved in the Rising, and Jack Shouldice’s reasoning why he could not take part in the Civil War. He used his position as full-time Secretary of the Leinster Council of the GAA as a reason for his non-involvement, combined with his revulsion of the fratricide on both sides, especially the killing of his close friend, Harry Boland. Track 5: Chris Shouldice recalls a casual meeting between his father and Éamon de Valera, and another with Richard Mulcahy, at both of which he was present as a child, and which demonstrated for him his father’s acceptance of the views of both men. The memory of close conversation between de Valera and W. T. Cosgrave at his father’s funeral in 1965 is also still vivid. Chris’s opinions on Home Rule and on the effects of the threat of conscription in Ireland prior to the Rising, are provided. Track 6: The friendships which existed between the children of 1916 revolutionaries are recalled. Chris Shouldice explains that he joined, for a brief period, the local Fianna Fáil Cumann on his return from America in 1960, where he had lived for some years, and his resultant friendship with George Colley. The circumstances surrounding the purchase of Knocklyon Castle are explained.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 6.34 MB, 8.50 MB, 7.87 MB, 16.21 MB, 8.58 MB, 12.98 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: William McGuire (b. 1943) William McGuire (b. 1943)
Interview location: Cappagh, Co. Limerick.
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-108
Subject: Vaughan’s Hotel, Parnell Square, Dublin
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 62:26
Track 1: The McGuire family’s ownership of the Cork Examiner in the 19th century is explored, as is the family background. William (Billy) McGuire describes the origins of the Irish Republican Brotherhood and the membership of his grandfather, William McGuire, and his brothers, Tom and James, in the organisation, all of whom were involved in fundraising for the purchase of Vaughan’s Hotel in 1917, and the setting up of Dáil Éireann. Tom McGuire fought in WWI with the British Army, and he was involved in intelligence for the IRB in Calcutta. He sent the intellegence gathered to Sam Maguire in London. Track 2: Contains a discussion on the purchase of Vaughan’s Hotel by the McGuire family, to provide headquarters for the IRB and to facilitate the printing of the newspaper, An tÓglach. The whereabouts of the McGuire brothers and William’s wife, Brigid Ryan from Newport, Co. Tipperary, prior to and during the Rising is explained, and the many visits made to Vaughan’s Hotel by revolutionary figures at this time are discussed. Track 3: The sale of Vaughan’s Hotel is recalled, as is the relocation of the McGuire family to “Willowbank” in Castletroy in Limerick, today the location of the University of Limerick. Track 4: The fate of the IRB Archive is discussed, as is the gutting of the interior of Vaughan’s Hotel, which is a great loss to history, Billy maintains.
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Number of files: 4
File size(s): 9.81 MB, 8.52 MB, 16.66 MB, 22.19 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Molly Waldron (b. 1895) Molly Waldron (b. 1895)
Interview location: Castlebar, Co. Mayo
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-109
Subject: Waldron, Molly (recording courtesy of the Geraghty family)
Recorded by: Peggy Geraghty
Recording date: 1980
Length: 30:26
Track 1: Molly Waldron speaks of her siblings, and recalls her brother who joined the North Irish Horse, and was stationed at The Curragh during the 1916 Rising. He later joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, and was killed in action in WWI. Schooldays in Aghamore are recalled, as is Molly’s mother’s work to help with family finances. The Lenten “Black Fast”, while Molly was attending boarding school in Sligo and in Drogheda, where she was a student teacher, is also explored. Tracks 2-3: Molly Waldron discusses her recollections of witnessing disturbances in Dublin during Easter Week 1916, when she was scheduled to undergo an examination in Westland Row. She recalls the difficulties encountered because of the suspension of transport. Refugees from France, who were housed at a Dalkey school during WWI are recalled, and Molly recites “A Soldier of the Legion”.
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Number of files: 3
File size(s): 10.66 MB, 9.98 MB, 7.24 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Sheila Healy (b. 1931) Sheila Healy (b. 1931)
Interview location: Douglas, Cork
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-110
Subject: Walsh, Batt (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 51:58
Track 1: Contains an explanation of the strongly republican Walsh family background in Glashbee, near Bweeing in North Cork, where Sheila Healy’s grandmother, Julie Walsh (née O’Hanlon), was the driving force. Sheila describes the mobilisation of the Irish Volunteers of North Cork at Bweeing village at Easter 1916. Track 2: The Walsh home at Glashbee was used as a safe house, and republican figures such as Éamon de Valera, Erskine Childers and Liam Lynch would stay there, explains Sheila Healy. She also mentions that her father, Batt Walsh, always kept in his wallet a photograph of Liam Lynch, autographed by de Valera and Lynch. She points out that a neighbour of the Walsh family was one of those executed by the Free State authorities during the Civil War. Sheila’s father and his family were forced to emigrate to America after the Civil War to find work, having taken the “wrong” side during the conflict. Track 3: Sheila Healy’s aunt, Mary Walsh, is recalled, as is her involvement in the War of Independence. Sheila reads from notes written by her father during those years. The funeral of Éamon de Valera is recalled and discussed and also recalled is Sheila’s uncle, Tom Walsh, and his treatment by the Black and Tans. Track 4: The disappointment and distress felt by Batt Walsh in relation to the Northern Troubles is described. Sheila explains how the financial position of republicans after the Civil War was very precarious. Also recalled is the collecting of guns from republicans in local towns and villages after the Civil War. Track 5: A story is recounted relating to the presence of Éamon de Valera in Glashbee, on the evening of the shooting of Michael Collins, 22 August 1922, and his response to this event: “I came south to meet Collins. There’s no hope for it now.”
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Number of files: 5
File size(s): 7.03 MB, 7.23 MB, 1.42 MB, 12.45 MB, 19.47 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


Interviewee: Paddy Weston (b. 1927) Paddy Weston (b. 1927)
Interview location: Lusk, Co. Dublin
Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collection
Product ID: CD191601-111
Subject: Weston, Charles (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Recording date: 2013
Length: 62:23
Track 1: Contains a discussion on Charles Weston’s early education, joining the IRB, and being involved, with his siblings, in the 1916 Rising. Charles Weston was a Section Leader. Paddy points out that the Lusk Brigade was well prepared for battle. Track 2: Paddy Weston gives an account of the battle of Ashbourne, and he explains his father Charles’s later decision to join the Free State Army. He was stationed in Kerry as a Captain in the Engineers during the Civil War. In 1923, he resigned from the army and his son explains the reasons for this decision. Track 3: In 1939, due to ill-health, Charles Weston refused an offer to be reinstated, explains Paddy Weston. He further explains that his father spoke little about his experiences during the 1916-1923 period, though Paddy was informed, by two survivors of the battle of Ashbourne, that his father’s responsibilities were in the area of explosives. Track 4: The decision by Charles Weston to refuse a military funeral, due to the perceived abuses of the pension system, is described by his son. He did get involved in the setting up of the Fingal Old IRA Men’s Welfare Society, the purpose of which was to assist the families of those involved in the Rising. Charles Weston and his sisters, Julia and Thomasina, were awarded military medals, and the women carefully saved their Cumann na mBan badges. These are retained by Paddy Weston, who describes his pride in his ownership of them. Track 5: The background to the Weston family, their arrival in Fingal, and Charles Weston’s working life following his resignation from the army, are all described. The reign of the Black and Tans in the Fingal area is recalled, as is Charles Weston’s escape from his home during a Black and Tan raid at that time. Track 6: The band set up by Tomás Ashe – The Black Raven Pipe Band – and its influence in bringing together a large group of young men, who would later become involved in the Rising, are discussed.
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Number of files: 6
File size(s): 9.30 MB, 5.69 MB, 11.06 MB, 9.30 MB, 6.40 MB, 15.43 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours
 


 

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