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Geraldine Wyndham-Quin, Countess of Dunraven and Mount-Earl (b.1942)

Geraldine Wyndham-Quin, Countess of Dunraven and Mount-Earl (b.1942)

Kilgobbin House, Adare, Co. Limerick

2016

 

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Kilgobbin House, built in 1742, became the home of Thady Wyndham-Quin, 7th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl, his wife, Lady Dunraven, and their daughter Lady Ana Wyndham-Quin following the death of his mother, Nancy Countess of Dunraven. The 7th Earl, who was born in 1939, passed away in March 2011 and this sad event marked the extinction of the earldom and the end of an important era. The Dunraven Estates continued to be operated by his wife, Lady Dunraven, and her daughter, Lady Ana, has recently taken over the business. In the garden at Kilgobbin House stands a stone dating back to the 9th century, on which is carved a Cross which is described by Lady Dunraven. The history of the alliance between the Quin and Wyndham families is explained. This alliance created great wealth for the Wyndham-Quin family which owns estates is both Adare and in Wales. The Wyndham Land Purchase Act of 1903, also known as the Landlord and Tenant Act, is discussed and an example of its effect locally is provided. The conferring of the freedom of Limerick City in 1918 on Windham Wyndham-Quin, 4th Earl, and its revoking following the formation of the Free State due to his promotion of conscription, is discussed. A letter written in 2007 from Limerick City Council is read, which advised the 7th Earl and Lady Dunraven that historians locally and in Dublin, having talked about this subject for many years, had been successful in their endeavours to have the revoking overturned. The album of family memorabilia which dates back to the 19th century is displayed and discussed. Photographs of some of the Earls of Dunraven are included, including that of Windham Henry Wyndham-Quin, 5th Earl and his wife, Lady Eva, whose maiden name was Bourke. She came from Co. Mayo and was related to the Gore-Booths of Lissadell House. She came to Adare Manor in 1927 with her husband from Castletown Cox in Co. Kilkenny when, on the death of Windham Wyndham-Quin, 4th Earl, the title went sideways. Lady Olein, daughter of the 5th Earl, also came to live at the Manor. Also included in the album is a photograph of Richard Wyndham-Quin, 6th Earl and his wife, formerly Nancy Yuille, who was of American ancestry and whose family had left Scotland in the 1740s. A photograph of Thady Wyndham-Quin, 7th Earl and Lady Dunraven is also displayed, and she explains the circumstances of their meeting. She also speaks about her husband’s disability and explains that he contracted poliomyelitis in 1956. Images of the interior of Adare Manor from the Lawrence Collection are shown, as are subsequent photographs of the interior prior to its opening in 1967/8 by Nancy, Countess of Dunraven. Initially it was used for formal occasions and for Hunt Balls and parties, and in 1968 the Manor was opened to the general public, being among the first in the State to do so. At its height, 82,000 people passed through the door in its last year, and a newspaper report in the New York Times suggested that it was one of the best places to visit in Ireland. The Manor closed to the public in 1982. A photograph taken on the occasion of the wedding of Thady Wyndham-Quin and Geraldine McAleer in 1969 is among the images displayed, and the years that followed are discussed in some detail as Lady Dunraven reads from some fascinating letters relating to events at the Manor. Mention is made of the many important and well-known guests who arrived at the Manor during what are described as great times. A chest filled with 18th century garments, discovered in the Manor in the 1970s, is described and an image showing in amazing detail a jacket and waistcoat from this chest is pointed out. A letter written on the notepaper of the Society of Saint Patrick when the 4th Earl was created a Knight of Saint Patrick is discussed. The story of the Adare Cigarette Company set up by the 4th Earl at the turn of the 20th century is told, and an advertisement showing a young lady enjoying a cigarette is included in the album. A fire destroyed the factory in 1917 and it never re-opened thereafter. Another advertisement, this one for the ‘Shamrock Coach’, which served Rathkeale, Adare, and Patrickswell to Limerick City is also included. Owing to the petrol rationing during World War II, the 6th Lord Dunraven started up this coach service to facilitate people travelling to Limerick. Another fascinating artefact examined and discussed is the Visitors’ Book from Adare Manor. This dates back to the beginning of the 20th century and contains the signatures of many members of the family and friends who came to stay at the Manor over the years. In 1982, most of the contents of Adare Manor were sold, excluding some paintings and furniture kept by the family, and two years later, the Manor was sold to Irish American Mr and Mrs Thomas Kane. The 7th Earl and his wife moved to Kilcurly House on the Dunraven Estate. The Manor had been offered to the Irish government on two occasions, during the tenure of An Taoiseach Mr Charles Haughey and that of An Taoiseach Mr Garrett FitzGerald, but the offers had not been accepted. In 1996 the Earl and his family moved to live at Kilgobbin House from where the family business is now operated. Thady Wyndham Quin, 7th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl, died on 25th March 2011. R.I.P.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 66.1 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-01
Subject: Lady Dunraven and her life in Adare
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 1:10:36


Caroline Beresford, Marchioness of Waterford (formerly Lady Caroline Olein Geraldine Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1936) and Lady Melissa Brooke (formerly Lady Melissa Eva Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1935), Part 1

Caroline Beresford, Marchioness of Waterford (formerly Lady Caroline Olein Geraldine Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1936) and Lady Melissa Brooke (formerly Lady Melissa Eva Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1935), Part 1

Ballymaigue, Co. Limerick

2016

 

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This initial section of the recording compiled with the Wyndham-Quin sisters, Caroline and Melissa, daughters of the 6th Earl of Dunraven Richard Wyndham-Quin and his American-born wife Lady Nancy (formerly Yuille), brings to the fore their memories of being brought to America with their brother Thady by their nanny at the outbreak of World War II. They left Ireland on the last liner to leave Galway at that time. The siblings were to live In America in the home of their aunt until 1942, when their mother visited and got permission from Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of the American President, to travel back to Adare with her son. They arrived at nearby Foynes on a flying-boat. On their return from America after the war, the children lived with their parents at Kilgobbin House on the Dunraven Estate. The sisters recall their many governesses during their childhood, including Miss Hamilton, Miss Weld (the grandaunt of Irish racehorse trainer Dermot Weld), and Miss Carroll. They recall their prep school days at Heathfield in Ascot, and Caroline discusses her finishing schools in Switzerland and in Paris. Some less than comfortable trips across the Irish Sea on the Innisfallen are remembered. Richard Wyndham-Quin, the 5th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl lived with his wife Eva, Countess of Dunraven, at Adare Manor. She died in 1942 and the Earl continued to make his home there. The sisters’ aunt, Lady Olein, worked with the Red Cross in London during World War II. She did not marry and she was to live on the Dunraven Estate until her death. Horses and hunting were an abiding passion for the Wyndham-Quin sisters, and they recall the wonderful horses bred at Fort Union Stud on the Dunraven Estate, and their successful sales. Details are given about the transportation of the horses to England in those days. Caroline mentions her success in the only point-to-point race she entered in Waterford. Melissa remarks that she was Master of the Limerick Hounds for 26 seasons. Shooting parties hosted on the Estate by their brother, Thady Wyndham-Quin, 7th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl, are fondly recalled. The worrying time when he contracted poliomyelitis in childhood, and the fact that its serious effects never hindered his ability to run the Estate, are discussed. The opening of Adare Manor to the public in the late 1960s is also recalled.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 41.7 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-02
Subject: Remembering childhood days at Adare
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 44:34


Caroline Beresford, Marchioness of Waterford (formerly Lady Caroline Olein Geraldine Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1936) and Lady Melissa Brooke (formerly Lady Melissa Eva Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1935), Part 2

Caroline Beresford, Marchioness of Waterford (formerly Lady Caroline Olein Geraldine Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1936) and Lady Melissa Brooke (formerly Lady Melissa Eva Wyndham-Quin) (b. 1935), Part 2

Ballymaigue, Co. Limerick

2016

 

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Caroline, Marchioness of Waterford and Lady Melissa Brooke recall and describe happy holidays spent at the family property at Derrynane in South Kerry. The sisters also recall an unforgettable occasion when their grand-uncle, Captain Valentine Wyndham-Quin, brought his Royal Navy vessel into Derrynane Bay during World War II, and the confusion this created amongst the local people. Lady Caroline married the 8th Marquess of Waterford at Adare in 1957, and Adare was also the location of the marriage of Lady Melissa to Major Sir George Brooke in 1959. Photographs of the wedding parties at the Manor are discussed and described. The wedding in 1945 of their cousin, Miss Mollie Wyndham-Quin, to The Hon Robert Cecil, the future Viscount Cranborne and subsequently 6th Marquess of Salisbury at Westminster Abbey, is recalled, and mention is made of the curtain fabric from Adare Manor which was utilised in the making of the bridal dresses for the occasion. The Limerick Show in former years is discussed, as is the input of their mother, Nancy Countess of Dunraven, in the instigation of the Flower Show. Garinish Island in Kenmare Bay, where Windham Wyndham-Quin, 5th Earl Dunraven would spend his summers, holds very fond memories for the sisters. This was a place where many exotic plants flourished. These had been brought back to Kerry following the Wyndham-Quin family’s world tours. Caroline’s husband, Tyrone Waterford, was a relative of the Lansdowne family who owned Derreen House in Lauragh near Kenmare in Co. Kerry, and she remembers her visits to the Lansdowne family there with great fondness. Curraghmore House in Co. Waterford became home to Caroline, Marchioness of Waterford following her marriage to The Marquess of Waterford at the age of 20 in 1957. She outlines the reasons why the house did not suffer the same sad fate as did many of the Big Houses in Ireland which were burnt during the War of Independence in Ireland (1919-1921). Lady Melissa explains why Adare Manor also escaped unscathed at this time. Both sisters describe the period in their lives when their father rented a house in London and they were presented at Court at Queen Charlotte’s Ball in Petworth House in Sussex. An interesting story told to the sisters by their father in relation to “coming out” at Dublin Castle in earlier days is told. In conclusion, the family legacy and the entail are discussed in detail.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 43 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-03
Subject: Holidays, weddings and other family events
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 45:55


Marjorie Olein (Mollie) Cecil (formerly Wyndham-Quin), Dowager Marchioness of Salisbury (b. 1922), Part 1

Marjorie Olein (Mollie) Cecil (formerly Wyndham-Quin), Dowager Marchioness of Salisbury (b. 1922), Part 1

Chelsea Square, London

2016

 

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Happy memories of Adare Manor during the young life of Miss Mollie Wyndham-Quin are detailed at the beginning of the recording. Her grandfather, Windham Henry Wyndham-Quin, 5th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl and his wife Eva, Countess of Dunraven, lived at the Manor during those years. Mollie recalls the many occasions on which she hunted there and took part in point-to-point races. Visits to the Dunraven family summerhouse at Derrynane in South Kerry are also fondly remembered. Mollie’s earliest memories were formed at Castletown Cox in Co. Kilkenny where her grandparents lived before her grandfather inherited the Dunraven title and estates on the death, in 1926, of his first cousin, Windham Thomas Wyndham-Quin, the 4th Earl of Dunraven. The influence of her governess at Castletown Cox, who introduced her to wild flowers and birds, is mentioned. Another strongly positive influence in this respect came through her mother, Marjorie Wyndham-Quin, who was a keen gardener. Mollie admits that she herself was not much interested in study at that early age. Later memories of fishing on the River Maigue which flows through the Dunraven Estate, and wonderful days of fox-hunting are described in detail. Mollie’s aunt, Lady Olein, who also lived on the Estate, and who mentored Mollie in horseriding, is fondly recalled. She was also a keen golfer and she regularly played on the Dunraven Golf Course, established in 1900. It was handed over to the Adare Golf Club trustees in the 1980s. Mollie explains that her father, Captain Valentine Wyndham-Quin, served in the Royal Navy for the duration of both World Wars and, of necessity, spent long periods away from home. The Dunraven Estate on the Glamorganshire coast in South Wales is discussed and the “Blue Lady” who would frequently appear at Dunraven Castle there is mentioned. Sadly, the castle was demolished in the 1960s. Mollie explains that she feels totally Irish, and that her roots are very much in Co. Limerick. The staff at Adare Manor in earlier times, including the chauffeur, the head gardener and the kitchen staff are all fondly remembered. Also mentioned are happy times spent at another family property at Garinish Island in Kenmare Bay. The preferred family holiday property was in Derrynane, also in Co. Kerry. The events which took place at the Limerick Show, established by the Dunravens, are recalled, as is the deep sadness Mollie experienced after the sale of Adare Manor. Much happier memories surface as she recalls her marriage to The Hon Robert Cecil, the future Viscount Cranborne and subsequently 6th Marquess of Salisbury, at Westminster Abbey in 1945. The couple initially lived at Lodge House in Hatfield Park. When her parents-in-law took over Hatfield House in 1948, and due to the inevitable neglect resulting from the war years when the house was used as a hospital, Mollie became very much involved with the work which needed to be undertaken in the house and gardens. The family moved to Cranborne in 1954 when Mollie took charge of major work on the gardens there. They took over Hatfield House, the seat of the Cecil family since 1611, when her husband succeeded to the title on the death of her father-in-law, 5th Marquess of Salisbury, in 1972. Hatfield had at one time been the home of Queen Elizabeth I. This first recording concluded with further memories of Mollie’s aunt, Lady Olein, whom she describes as having been her “guardian spirit”. She also recalls her grandfather, Windham Henry Wyndham-Quin, 5th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl, who was passionate about the running of the Estate, the upkeep of the village, the wellbeing of his workers and of the people of Adare. During the revolutionary period of 1916 to 1923, he would travel by horse and trap to troubled areas to meet with the local IRA leaders in an effort “to talk sense to them”. In conclusion, Mollie speaks about family titles and their importance to her and to her family.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 57.4 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-04
Subject: Early Irish Memories
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 1:01:14


Marjorie Olein (Mollie) Cecil (formerly Wyndham-Quin), Dowager Marchioness of Salisbury (b. 1922), Part 2

Marjorie Olein (Mollie) Cecil (formerly Wyndham-Quin), Dowager Marchioness of Salisbury (b. 1922), Part 2

Chelsea Square, London

2016

 

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This second recording begins with recollections of the early years in the married life of Mollie, Marchioness of Salisbury at her home in Lodge House in Hatfield Park, where she worked on her first proper garden. In 1947 her grandfather-in-law, James Gascoyne -Cecil 4th Marquess of Salisbury died, and her parents-in-law took over Hatfield House where much work needed to be done to the house and gardens following the long years of war. In 1954, the family moved to Cranborne, where Mollie undertook tremendous work on the gardens, and was very much involved with horses and hunting. She was also kept busy with her young family. In 1972, on the death of her father-in-law, Robert Cecil, 5th Marquess of Salisbury, the family took over Hatfield House, and again, Mollie worked on her wonderful gardens there, while maintaining her interest in the gardens at Cranborne. Reverting back to earlier days, she recalls her wartime work as a VAD nurse in various military hospitals, including at Bath and at Salisbury, where she got to know the Cecil family. She recalls her meeting with her future husband, the Hon. Robert Cecil, and describes his wartime service with the Grenadier Guards during the invasion of Normandy in 1944, and in Malta. Her trip across the Irish Sea for a wartime visit to Adare Manor is described, and her views on Irish neutrality at this time are outlined. She also recalls the formality of dining at the Manor, when she would join her grandfather, Windham Henry Wyndham-Quin 5th Earl of Dunraven, for dinner in the evenings. The Hunt Balls and dinner parties and some of the attendant guests are remembered. She reflects on her memories of the domestic staff, the produce which came to the kitchens from the walled garden and the glasshouses, and shooting parties at the Manor. The wonderful haul of salmon and trout from the River Maigue is also discussed. The beautiful garden she created for George Magan at Castletown Cox in Co. Kilkenny is fondly remembered. While examining some family photographs in the library at her home in London’s Chelsea Square, Mollie speaks about her two sisters, Ursula and Pamela, and explains that the three girls were known as “The Three Graces”. They were famously photographed by Cecil Beaton in 1950. Her real passion in life was hunting, she explains, and she hunted with the Beaufort in Gloucestershire and occasionally in Leicestershire. She continued to hunt until the early 1980s, and she details the reasons why the Irish hunting at Adare was superior, in her view. The Dunraven Estate in Wales, and happy times swimming at Witch’s Point, are recalled. A more challenging time in her young life is reflected upon as she describes driving with a friend to Poland with a lorry load of medical equipment and provisions at a time of great need in that country after World War II. She felt that the British owed the Poles an enormous debt of gratitude and that they had been somewhat forgotten after the war. She was granted an audience with the Pope and was honoured by the Polish authorities in recognition of her great work. Her memories of the house to which her father retired at the end of his naval career are described, and she recounts an anecdote about a visit by President Putin to the Chelsea Flower Show during her tenure as Vice President of the Royal Horticultural Society.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 61.7 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-05
Subject: A passion for gardening and hunting
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 1:05:51


Oswald (Obbie) Waller (b. 1928)

Oswald (Obbie) Waller (b. 1928)

Mount Coote Stud, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick

2016

 

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Obbie Waller’s parents, Bertie Waller and Marjorie Harrison, lived with their family at Beechmount House in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, just a short distance from the Lillingston family at Mount Coote Stud in Kilmallock where this recording was compiled. Obbie and the late Alan Lillingston were great friends, and Obbie would often visit Mount Coote from his home in London. Obbie explains that he worked as an interior decorator in London for much of his life. His father, Bertie Waller, was a North Tipperary man and his mother Marjorie was a member of the Harrison family who own T. & J. Harrison shipping line in Liverpool. Bertie Waller joined the Royal Flying Corps in World War I and served in the RAF during World War II. Obbie has memories of his early life when his family lived initially on the shores of Lough Derg in North Tipperary, moving to Croom House where they lived for three years before finally relocating to Beechmount House in Rathkeale. He discusses his early education and his first prep school at Castle Park in Co. Dublin, followed by his studies at Charterhouse School in Surrey. His memories of the Emergency period (1939-1945), when his mother ran the farm while his father was on active service, are described. He spent a lot of time at Adare Manor during his childhood and teenage years, and memories of these years are also recalled, which include details of fine entertainment at the many parties held there. He speaks about his first kiss with Fred Astaire’s sister Adele. The characters of the sisters Ursula, Pamela and Mollie Wyndham-Quin are also recalled and described. Nora Lyons was Obbie Waller’s nanny and she is remembered as being a great person. She married James Lyons who worked for the Dunraven Estate. Obbie recalls the family holiday home in Sneem in Co. Kerry where he spent many wonderful summers with the Dunraven family who were holidaying at their summerhouse in nearby Derrynane. These days hold very happy memories for him, and he has some fascinating stories to tell, including the occasion when, shortly after they married, Mollie (formerly Wyndham-Quin) and Lord Robert Cecil, future Marquess of Salisbury, visited Derrynane and were hounded by the press. Obbie now turns his attention to the years of World War II and his family’s involvement in that conflict. He explains that his brother suffered from depression as a result of his experiences. His father was assigned to Foynes in 1943 to run British Airways, and Obbie explains that this was a most interesting time, which he describes in detail. The occasion when Winston Churchill travelled by flying-boat from Southampton to Foynes on his way to Lisbon is recalled, as is his father’s entertaining of visitors who travelled to Foynes on the flying-boats. Obbie also recalls a trip he made with Alan Lillingston from Paris to Shannon on a Pan Am flight. He himself joined the National Service in 1947 and served in Tripoli for two years. In the 1950s his parents moved to the Old Rectory in Rathkeale. Obbie explains that his mother was visually impaired, though this did not detract from her enjoyment of fox-hunting with Lord and Lady Adare. Also mentioned is the wonderful assistance afforded to his mother by Robert Leech, butler to the Earl. Obbie’s father would often fish on the River Maigue with Lady Olein Wyndham-Quin, daughter of the 5th Earl. Obbie set up his business in London in 1957, and he remembers the great assistance given to him in the early days by Lady Nancy, wife of Richard Wyndham-Quin, 6th Earl of Dunraven, as she made introductions to potential clients. He says that the most interesting house he worked on was Mount Juliet in Kilkenny, then owned by the McCalmont family.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 58.7 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-06
Subject: Memories of Adare Manor and the Waller family
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 1:02:38


Milo Spillane (b.1936), Part 1

Milo Spillane (b.1936), Part 1

Adare Manor Golf Club

2016

 

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Scottish-born Ben Sayers designed the Dunraven Golf Links in 1896. The Golf Club was set up in 1900 and affiliated to the Golfing Union in 1932. Over the decades the links had its resident golf professional who lived close to the present clubhouse. Pat Smith was the last professional to live there in the 1950s. The golf links was set up as a private club by Windham Wyndham-Quin, the 4th Earl of Dunraven. It became an open club in 1932. The land was leased to the members in 1978 when five trustees were appointed, and sold to the club in 1982. Milo Spillane became a member of the club in 1964, and he is now the longest serving member. He has served as Club Captain and President and is now one of the Adare Manor Golf Club trustees. His father came originally from Rathcormac in Co. Cork, and he became a member of the Garda Síochána after the formation of the Irish Free State. Following postings to several areas he was appointed to Adare as Garda Sergeant and he lived in the village from 1953 to 1959. This recording was compiled on site. At the entrance to Adare Manor Golf Club Milo explains that the Manor walls were built in 1865, and it was at this time that the borders for the golf course were formed. While walking towards the Desmond Castle, close to the 1st green, he explains that the castle was occupied by the Earls of Desmond for approximately 50 years, and was built around the early 13th century. Later, the castle was occupied by the Fitzgeralds. Moving towards the 2nd green, he outlines the history of the Dunravens, explaining that the Quins first came to the area and settled in Kilmallock before relocating to Adare in c.1740. The Quins acquired their lands in Adare firstly by leasing. As the Kildare Fitzgeralds moved to Maynooth, the Quins later purchased the freehold of the lands. The Earldom of Dunraven and Mount-Earl was created in 1822, and the family alliance between the Quins and the Wyndhams is described. Work on the construction of Adare Manor was begun in 1852 and the building was completed in 1860. There are two ruins in St. Nicholas Old Graveyard which is now approached - the old parish church, Catholic until the Reformation, and a smaller ruin, sometimes called the Earl of Desmond’s Chapel of Ease, but in reality a Chantry Chapel. Earlier members of the Quin family were buried in or around the ruined Franciscan Convent and later in the altar area of the by then Protestant Church (Valentine Quin conformed to the Established Church in 1739). The church was abandoned after 1809, and in c. 1822 the burial place was removed to the cloister of the former Augustinian Monastery, the Protestant parish church of today. From c.1850, subsequent Earls were buried adjacent to the Estate Church. In 1969, the Estate Company added a new section to the old graveyard in the golf club and that became the family burial ground. The 6th and 7th Earls of Dunraven are buried here. Milo recounts a fascinating story about the nearby grave of the first cousin of Lord Kitchener. The Connolly family, which was involved in the building of the Manor, are recalled and an explanation of the American origin of the Fort Union name of the stud farm on the Estate is provided. This was one of the first sections of the Estate to be sold, Milo explains. Close to the 5th hole on the golf course, the place where once stood the old Methodist preaching house, built in 1797, is pointed out, and the fairway which follows the old turnpike road leads in the direction of the next historical sighting.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 78.2 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-07
Subject: Adare Manor Golf Club traversed
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 1:23:25


Milo Spillane (b.1936), Part 2

Milo Spillane (b.1936), Part 2

Adare Manor Golf Club

2016

 

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In this section of the recording, Milo Spillane, while walking towards the Franciscan Friary, explains the origin of the name Southwell’s Cross on the turnpike road. A man named Southwell was the occupier or tenant of the gate lodge at the cross, according to the Tithe Applotment Books. This was possibly the main entrance from the turnpike road to Adare House. The road to the left leads to Lantern Lodge and the old entrance to Adare Manor, and the old road to the right leads to Croom. The Franciscan monks who came to Adare in 1460 are remembered, and while walking through the ruins of the Friary Milo indicates the library, the common room, the sacristan’s room, the Great East window, the effigys, the cloisters and the tomb of the Earl of Kildare. Moving outside the ruins, he indicates the monument to John Wesley, founder of the Methodist Church, who delivered a speech at this spot in 1756 while on his way to Limerick, having visited Palatine settlements around Rathkeale. Milo discusses this story and has his own theory relating to that event. Moving onwards, the Augustinian Priory appears in the distance, and it is explained that in 1814 the rectory was roofed and converted into a school. In 1817 it was renovated and in c.1852 Caroline, Lady Dunraven, the widow of Windham Henry Quin, 2nd Earl of Dunraven, was involved in its renovation. While heading towards the River Maigue, Milo indicates the road bridge over the river which was built by the Earls of Kildare around the 1300s. A very narrow bridge, in the last century when it was being widened, the Earl of Dunraven ensured that the original and interesting pedestrian refuges at the south side of the bridge were retained, and the work was undertaken at the north side. Today, it stands as an eight-arch bridge. The River Maigue was always a busy passageway from the Shannon Estuary to the Abbeys, down through the centuries. The source of the river is near Milford in Co. Cork. Milo Spillane, a secondary schoolteacher who worked in Limerick city until his retirement in 1997, declares that no other golf course in the British Isles can compare with that at Adare because of the extraordinary historical context in which it is set.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 43.1 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-08
Subject: Adare Manor Golf Club traversed
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 46:04


Michael Ryan (b.1938), Part 1

Michael Ryan (b.1938), Part 1

Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick

2016

 

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The Ryan family lived at the gatekeepers cottage which was situated opposite the gates of Adare Manor, and Mike Ryan was one of eleven children born to the family. His mother, Margaret Burns from Corcamore, Clarina, Co. Limerick came to Adare village at the age of 16 to work as a housemaid initially for local general practitioner Dr Costello. After her marriage to Jack Ryan, the couple moved to the Gatekeepers Cottage. She was paid five shillings a week and she needed to be constantly available to open and close the gates to Adare Manor. Jack Ryan was the Groundskeeper who maintained the driveways in the demesne which were always beautifully edged and gravelled. His son Mick now recalls the village thatcher, Jack McMahon, who was known as ‘The Gealt’, and his character is described. In the 1960s he thatched the gazebo in the Adare village park. On finishing his schooling, Mick Ryan worked as an apprentice plumber in the Dunraven Arms Hotel. He names the staff members at that time in the late 1940s. He also mentions Mrs Fossett who was a long term guest at the hotel, and the deputy manageress, Miss O’Halloran. Mrs Fossett had a Rolls Royce and a driver, Matt Hayes, at her disposal. Both ladies left the hotel in the early 1950s when Miss O’Hehir took over. Mick explains that when he worked there during the years of World War II, when fuel was scarce, he would bring the unburnt coals from the hotel fires across the road to his mother’s cottage in the evenings. When a shoot was organised at the Manor, Mick would caddie for Commander Valentine Wyndham-Quin, and he describes all aspects of activities during a day’s shooting. He also mentions the fact that the Manor would pay him for his work, and so also would the Commander. He recalls the annual occurrence when he would go to the grounds of the Manor to round up the hares for the Clounanna Coursing meeting. The game of pitch and toss, which was a popular pastime in Adare village in earlier days, is described, and some of the characters and tradesmen in the village are recalled, including Paddy O’Shea the shoemaker, the blacksmiths, Sonny Brennan and his father, the carpenters, the wheelwright, Jimmy Kelly, and the stonemasons. The travelling performers and entertainers who would visit Adare in bygone years are also recalled.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 58.5 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-09
Subject: Bygone days in Adare village
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 1:02:14


Michael Ryan (b.1938), Part 2

Michael Ryan (b.1938), Part 2

Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick

2016

 

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Michael Ryan recalls the many crews which worked on the Dunraven Estate in earlier days, including the foresters, the agricultural crew, the fishery crew, the gardening crew and the groomsmen at Fort Union Stud. He explains that the Estate included over one thousand acres of wooded lands and he recalls the names of many of the forestry crew who worked there in earlier days. He mentions the real importance of timber as fuel during the ‘Emergency’ period (1939-1945). The dairy at the Manor produced milk for the villagers and for the surrounding areas. The herdsmen took care of the prized cattle. The garden crew which worked under the direction of Mr Pullman are all recalled, as are the kitchen staff, the butler, the footman and the drivers. The individual buildings on the Estate, and their inhabitants, are remembered. Mike Ryan served on the committee and worked at collecting advertisements for the periodical Past Pupils Union C.B.S. Adare, first produced in 1983, and he discusses its content and mentions some of the articles written for the publication. In conclusion, he describes the unique manner in which the residents of Adare Manor and the people of the village lived and worked in gentle harmony down through the generations.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 47.8 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The Adare Manor and Village Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDAD01-10
Subject: Earlier days in Adare village
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 51:01


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