Other information

Fionán Lynch (b. 1889)

6.9910.00

Description

Track 1: Fionán Lynch discusses his career in teaching, from his training days beginning in 1909 at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin. His friendship with Gearóid O’Sullivan is also mentioned, as is his joining of the Gaelic League (where he taught Irish), and the Irish Volunteers, F Company, First Battalion. Track 2: Fionán Lynch was Captain of F Company in the week before the Rising, during a period which he describes as “a week of rumours”. Mention is made of the O’Connor brothers, John and Tommy, of Sherrard Street, with whom Thomas Clarke stayed during this week. Track 3: On Good Friday 1916, Fionán Lynch, Shouldice and O’Hegarty were ordered to go to King Street and Church Street, where they were to be positioned during the week, Fionán Lynch explains. He also discusses the unsuccessful plan to bring wireless apparatus from Cahirciveen to Dublin, a trip in which he was initially meant to be involved. Track 4: Fionán Lynch recalls reading, with Gearóid O’Sullivan, the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin MacNeill in the Sunday Independent, following which they brought the newspaper to Seán McDiarmada at 44 Mountjoy Street, who was bitterly disappointed. Meetings of the Irish Volunteer leaders at the headquarters of the Keating Branch of the Gaelic League are recalled, as is the decision later that Sunday that the Rising would begin on the following day. Track 5: The arrival of the men at 44, Mountjoy Street to collect uniforms, guns and ammunition early on Easter Monday, is described. The later assembly at Blackhall Place, then North King Street and along to Church Street is also recalled. The quietness of the first three days of Easter Week are described, as is the heavy fire of Wednesday morning at North King Street, and the house to house fighting, resulting in many civilian casualties. Track 6: The events of Saturday are recalled, including the activities of a British armoured car which was causing much damage, and the retreat to the Four Courts where Fionán Lynch saw many British officers and soldiers being held. Track 7: The march to Richmond Barracks from The Rotunda Rink on the Sunday morning, and their arrival at Kilmainham Jail are recalled by Fionán Lynch. His transfer to Mountjoy Prison, and his later march to the North Wall, are also recalled. Track 8: The handing over of the arms of the Irish Volunteers after the surrender is described, and the character of The O’Rahilly is recalled. Fionán Lynch also details the journey to Portland Prison in England. The gentle nature of Michael Mallin and James Connolly’s lectures in street fighting, prior to the Rising, are discussed. Track 9: Fionán Lynch describes the reception afforded to the Volunteers on their release from prison and return to Ireland. His subsequent work in canvassing with Tomás Ashe in Clare is also recalled, as is his attendance at the first Roger Casement Commemoration in Tralee, Co. Kerry, in 1917. That year, he was arrested and sentenced to two years imprisonment in Mountjoy Jail, where he and others went on hunger strike, resulting in the death of Ashe. Fionán Lynch records the fact that he was the last person to speak to Ashe before his death.

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Description

Track 1: Fionán Lynch discusses his career in teaching, from his training days beginning in 1909 at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin. His friendship with Gearóid O’Sullivan is also mentioned, as is his joining of the Gaelic League (where he taught Irish), and the Irish Volunteers, F Company, First Battalion. Track 2: Fionán Lynch was Captain of F Company in the week before the Rising, during a period which he describes as “a week of rumours”. Mention is made of the O’Connor brothers, John and Tommy, of Sherrard Street, with whom Thomas Clarke stayed during this week. Track 3: On Good Friday 1916, Fionán Lynch, Shouldice and O’Hegarty were ordered to go to King Street and Church Street, where they were to be positioned during the week, Fionán Lynch explains. He also discusses the unsuccessful plan to bring wireless apparatus from Cahirciveen to Dublin, a trip in which he was initially meant to be involved. Track 4: Fionán Lynch recalls reading, with Gearóid O’Sullivan, the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin MacNeill in the Sunday Independent, following which they brought the newspaper to Seán McDiarmada at 44 Mountjoy Street, who was bitterly disappointed. Meetings of the Irish Volunteer leaders at the headquarters of the Keating Branch of the Gaelic League are recalled, as is the decision later that Sunday that the Rising would begin on the following day. Track 5: The arrival of the men at 44, Mountjoy Street to collect uniforms, guns and ammunition early on Easter Monday, is described. The later assembly at Blackhall Place, then North King Street and along to Church Street is also recalled. The quietness of the first three days of Easter Week are described, as is the heavy fire of Wednesday morning at North King Street, and the house to house fighting, resulting in many civilian casualties. Track 6: The events of Saturday are recalled, including the activities of a British armoured car which was causing much damage, and the retreat to the Four Courts where Fionán Lynch saw many British officers and soldiers being held. Track 7: The march to Richmond Barracks from The Rotunda Rink on the Sunday morning, and their arrival at Kilmainham Jail are recalled by Fionán Lynch. His transfer to Mountjoy Prison, and his later march to the North Wall, are also recalled. Track 8: The handing over of the arms of the Irish Volunteers after the surrender is described, and the character of The O’Rahilly is recalled. Fionán Lynch also details the journey to Portland Prison in England. The gentle nature of Michael Mallin and James Connolly’s lectures in street fighting, prior to the Rising, are discussed. Track 9: Fionán Lynch describes the reception afforded to the Volunteers on their release from prison and return to Ireland. His subsequent work in canvassing with Tomás Ashe in Clare is also recalled, as is his attendance at the first Roger Casement Commemoration in Tralee, Co. Kerry, in 1917. That year, he was arrested and sentenced to two years imprisonment in Mountjoy Jail, where he and others went on hunger strike, resulting in the death of Ashe. Fionán Lynch records the fact that he was the last person to speak to Ashe before his death.

Additional information

Type:

Disk, MP3

Audio series:

The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections

Bitrate:

128 kbps

Download time limit:

48 hours

File size(s):

8.45 MB, 4.27 MB, 2.37 MB, 4.36 MB, 5.70 MB, 4.33 MB, 3.89 MB, 7.42 MB, 10.46 MB

Number of files:

9

Product ID:

CD191601-060

Subject:

Lynch, Fionán (recording courtesy of the Lynch family)

Recorded by:

BBC Radio

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