Other information

Jimmy Weston (b. 1937) and his son Paul; (in 2nd section) Gladys Weston (née Brown)

6.9915.00

Description

Jimmy Weston recalls and describes his aunts Thomasina and Julia Weston, and their relocation from their farm to a shop on the Main Street in Swords. Thomasina had married Johnny Linders and had become a farmer’s wife, and her sister Julia lived with the couple. She specialised in the rearing of poultry. Jimmy explains that until recent years he did not know much about the sisters’ Cumann na mBan background. As he understands it, women were more able than men to move around freely and carry messages. A story is told about a hidden section in the house, which Jimmy recalls, and a search of the house by the Black and Tans. Julia and Thomasina’s mother Kate kept Michael McAllister hidden in this secret area prior to his emigration to the USA. Jimmy describes how the Black and Tans would position a sniper from a stand of trees near the house so as to catch Bartle or Charlie Weston or Michael McAllister. Both Bartle and Charlie had been imprisoned in Frongoch after the Rising. Jimmy describes a cross carved from bone which was made at Frongoch, and he and Paul discuss schoolteacher Thomas Ashe. It is recalled that Sheila, Jimmy’s sister and Julia’s niece, would make all of Julia’s clothes, and that Thomasina was retiring in her manner, and Julia more forceful and a formidable businesswoman. Bartle Weston’s medals are still in the family, though none of the Cumann na mBan memorabilia is with them. Family photographs are discussed and Paul talks about the old forge and the house. Both Charlie and Bartle Weston were bricklayers. Jimmy recalls the McAllister family who owned some land around the area. Bartle Weston married a McAllister and built the family home. At this time, Julia and Thomasina Weston relocated to Ballymadroch and Charlie lived at Portrane. In the second section of this recording, Gladys Weston (née Brown), widow of Paddy Weston, explains that she is from Westport, Co. Mayo, and on her marriage in 1963, she and Paddy moved to Julia’s shop in Swords which Paddy had inherited. Thomasina’s husband Johnny lived with the young Weston’s at the shop until his death. Thomasina had predeceased her sister Julia. Gladys tells a story, told to her by her husband, about Julia saving Charlie Weston from the Black and Tans. She discusses a story written by Thomas Ashe in The Irish War News, with a handwritten dedication to the two Weston sisters. The Weston family grew up in Turvey, close to the McAllister family, and the respective grandmothers were related. Gladys discusses the help given by the women to the cause by feeding the insurgents. She further discusses the corner shop and the stories she heard about Julia Weston from the local people. Some old papers which had belonged to Paddy Weston are examined and Gladys reads from Charlie Weston’s statement (WS 149) which describes the preparations and training for the Rising. He was a member of Lusk Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal) Dublin Brigade. The statement includes a description of the events at Ashbourne. Gladys says that her late husband was proud of the fact that his father had been a colleague of Thomas Ashe, and proud of the part he played in the Rising.

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Description

Jimmy Weston recalls and describes his aunts Thomasina and Julia Weston, and their relocation from their farm to a shop on the Main Street in Swords. Thomasina had married Johnny Linders and had become a farmer’s wife, and her sister Julia lived with the couple. She specialised in the rearing of poultry. Jimmy explains that until recent years he did not know much about the sisters’ Cumann na mBan background. As he understands it, women were more able than men to move around freely and carry messages. A story is told about a hidden section in the house, which Jimmy recalls, and a search of the house by the Black and Tans. Julia and Thomasina’s mother Kate kept Michael McAllister hidden in this secret area prior to his emigration to the USA. Jimmy describes how the Black and Tans would position a sniper from a stand of trees near the house so as to catch Bartle or Charlie Weston or Michael McAllister. Both Bartle and Charlie had been imprisoned in Frongoch after the Rising. Jimmy describes a cross carved from bone which was made at Frongoch, and he and Paul discuss schoolteacher Thomas Ashe. It is recalled that Sheila, Jimmy’s sister and Julia’s niece, would make all of Julia’s clothes, and that Thomasina was retiring in her manner, and Julia more forceful and a formidable businesswoman. Bartle Weston’s medals are still in the family, though none of the Cumann na mBan memorabilia is with them. Family photographs are discussed and Paul talks about the old forge and the house. Both Charlie and Bartle Weston were bricklayers. Jimmy recalls the McAllister family who owned some land around the area. Bartle Weston married a McAllister and built the family home. At this time, Julia and Thomasina Weston relocated to Ballymadroch and Charlie lived at Portrane. In the second section of this recording, Gladys Weston (née Brown), widow of Paddy Weston, explains that she is from Westport, Co. Mayo, and on her marriage in 1963, she and Paddy moved to Julia’s shop in Swords which Paddy had inherited. Thomasina’s husband Johnny lived with the young Weston’s at the shop until his death. Thomasina had predeceased her sister Julia. Gladys tells a story, told to her by her husband, about Julia saving Charlie Weston from the Black and Tans. She discusses a story written by Thomas Ashe in The Irish War News, with a handwritten dedication to the two Weston sisters. The Weston family grew up in Turvey, close to the McAllister family, and the respective grandmothers were related. Gladys discusses the help given by the women to the cause by feeding the insurgents. She further discusses the corner shop and the stories she heard about Julia Weston from the local people. Some old papers which had belonged to Paddy Weston are examined and Gladys reads from Charlie Weston’s statement (WS 149) which describes the preparations and training for the Rising. He was a member of Lusk Company, 5th Battalion (Fingal) Dublin Brigade. The statement includes a description of the events at Ashbourne. Gladys says that her late husband was proud of the fact that his father had been a colleague of Thomas Ashe, and proud of the part he played in the Rising.

Additional information

Type:

Disk, MP3

Audio series:

The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections

Bitrate:

128 kbps

Download time limit:

48 hours

File size(s):

49.32 MB

Number of files:
Product ID:

CD191602-073

Subject:

Thomasina and Julia Weston (Interviewees’ aunts/grandaunts) and Bartle Weston (Interviewees’ father/grandfather); (in 2nd section) Charlie Weston (3rd Interviewee’s father-in-law)

Recorded by:

Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore

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