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Kathleen Brady

6.9910.00

Description

Kathleen Brady’s great-grandfather was born in Co. Westmeath and was employed on the railway. When in their 70s, he and his wife emigrated to the USA where some of their adult children had settled. Kathleen explains that her grandfather married Mary Cox of Dorset Street in Dublin, and her father, Patrick Carroll, was reared by his grandparents in Glasnevin while his parents lived in Henrietta Street. Her father joined Fianna Éireann at the age of 14. At Easter Week 1916, aged 17, he was located at Harcourt Street railway station and also at the GPO. He was detained at the Rotunda, held for a week at Richmond Barracks and eventually released because of his youth. His daughter explains that Patrick was in charge of an arms dump at Capel Street during the Civil War, and was arrested and imprisoned for six months. She recalls that Patrick’s mother attempted to bring food to him at the GPO during the Rising but was dissuaded from doing so by a British soldier. Patrick stated in his witness statement that he was on guard duty on the night on which the 1916 Proclamation was printed. Kathleen describes an occasion when her father returned home from a meeting of old IRA members in 1970. Patrick Carroll had been an apprentice sheet metal worker but his employment was terminated because he took part in the Rising. He later worked at Wills Tobacco Company where Kathleen herself was also employed. Her father bought a Corporation-built house in Cabra in 1936, she explains. She describes her father’s character and behaviour, and recounts an anecdote which illustrates his attitude to life and his reason for fighting for Irish freedom. Patrick Carroll applied for the military service pension and from his application Kathleen has discovered new information in relation to him. Her mother was Christina Mc Affee, and her family and origins are discussed. Kathleen explains that her father would only relate to his children funny stories about his time in the IRA, and she remembers him as an affectionate father. His group of friends included Seán T. O’Kelly and Seán Lemass. Patrick Carroll supported the anti-Treaty side, though Kathleen recalls the fact that he did not wholeheartedly support de Valera later in his life. Through her researches, she has discovered that her father was a marked man during the Civil War. His pension application is long and detailed, she says. The witnesses to the statement were Walter Carpenter, Michael Dwyer and Séamus McGowan. Kathleen tells an anecdote about an incident which occurred during a visit with her mother to Northern Ireland. She examines a document which details the fact that her father was on active service from 1916 through to 1923, and she reads some details about his activities. She recalls her father’s funeral which was very well attended. She explains that while robust exchanges of views may have occurred in their home, she does not remember her father expressing any negative opinions. She reads his obituary which was printed in the Liberty Magazine. The article details Patrick’s activities during the Rising and refers to his detention in Tintown in the Curragh in 1922. Kathleen’s wish is for the government to recognise the men and women of 1916 who never looked for any reward or praise for their loyalty to their country. She speaks about the 4th of July celebrations in America, and recalls her appearance on RTÉ television at the Garden of Remembrance in 2013 during Queen Elizabeth II’s visit. When she watched the old footage filmed in 1966 at the opening of the Garden of Remembrance, she recognised her father in the group.

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Description

Kathleen Brady’s great-grandfather was born in Co. Westmeath and was employed on the railway. When in their 70s, he and his wife emigrated to the USA where some of their adult children had settled. Kathleen explains that her grandfather married Mary Cox of Dorset Street in Dublin, and her father, Patrick Carroll, was reared by his grandparents in Glasnevin while his parents lived in Henrietta Street. Her father joined Fianna Éireann at the age of 14. At Easter Week 1916, aged 17, he was located at Harcourt Street railway station and also at the GPO. He was detained at the Rotunda, held for a week at Richmond Barracks and eventually released because of his youth. His daughter explains that Patrick was in charge of an arms dump at Capel Street during the Civil War, and was arrested and imprisoned for six months. She recalls that Patrick’s mother attempted to bring food to him at the GPO during the Rising but was dissuaded from doing so by a British soldier. Patrick stated in his witness statement that he was on guard duty on the night on which the 1916 Proclamation was printed. Kathleen describes an occasion when her father returned home from a meeting of old IRA members in 1970. Patrick Carroll had been an apprentice sheet metal worker but his employment was terminated because he took part in the Rising. He later worked at Wills Tobacco Company where Kathleen herself was also employed. Her father bought a Corporation-built house in Cabra in 1936, she explains. She describes her father’s character and behaviour, and recounts an anecdote which illustrates his attitude to life and his reason for fighting for Irish freedom. Patrick Carroll applied for the military service pension and from his application Kathleen has discovered new information in relation to him. Her mother was Christina Mc Affee, and her family and origins are discussed. Kathleen explains that her father would only relate to his children funny stories about his time in the IRA, and she remembers him as an affectionate father. His group of friends included Seán T. O’Kelly and Seán Lemass. Patrick Carroll supported the anti-Treaty side, though Kathleen recalls the fact that he did not wholeheartedly support de Valera later in his life. Through her researches, she has discovered that her father was a marked man during the Civil War. His pension application is long and detailed, she says. The witnesses to the statement were Walter Carpenter, Michael Dwyer and Séamus McGowan. Kathleen tells an anecdote about an incident which occurred during a visit with her mother to Northern Ireland. She examines a document which details the fact that her father was on active service from 1916 through to 1923, and she reads some details about his activities. She recalls her father’s funeral which was very well attended. She explains that while robust exchanges of views may have occurred in their home, she does not remember her father expressing any negative opinions. She reads his obituary which was printed in the Liberty Magazine. The article details Patrick’s activities during the Rising and refers to his detention in Tintown in the Curragh in 1922. Kathleen’s wish is for the government to recognise the men and women of 1916 who never looked for any reward or praise for their loyalty to their country. She speaks about the 4th of July celebrations in America, and recalls her appearance on RTÉ television at the Garden of Remembrance in 2013 during Queen Elizabeth II’s visit. When she watched the old footage filmed in 1966 at the opening of the Garden of Remembrance, she recognised her father in the group.

Additional information

Type:

Disk, MP3

Audio series:

The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections

Bitrate:

128 kbps

Download time limit:

48 hours

File size(s):

36.26 MB

Number of files:

6

Product ID:

CD191602-003

Subject:

Patrick Carroll (Interviewee’s father)

Recorded by:

Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore

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