Other information

Peg Doyle (b. 1933)

6.9915.00

Description

Raheen in Ventry was the childhood home place of Peg Doyle (née Kavanagh). Her grandparents were Kate Hickson of Lispole and Daniel Kavanagh, and they had ten children. Peg’s mother Nora married Joseph Kavanagh, and they had seven children. Her brother, who inherited the farm, had seven children, so the house was always filled with life. Daniel Kavanagh and his brother Sean were bonesetters, and people came to the family home from all over the country for treatment at that time. Peg has a clear memory of the smell of seal oil permeating the house. This was used by her grandfather and granduncle in their treatment of patients. She recalls cooking over an open fire in the 1940s and 50s, barking the fishing nets, bringing the pigs to Tralee on a horse and creel, and other farming practices. Emigration when one reached the late teenage years was the norm, and Peg left for Springfield in the U.S., along with her siblings. She recalls in detail her experiences there and meeting her future husband, Stanley Doyle, who was a traditional musician who performed in bars across America. Her memories of travelling by train between cities in her adopted country are compared with travelling on the narrow-gauge railway line between Dingle and Tralee. She and her husband later returned to her family home in Ballinacourty in Annascaul, and she recounts many stories of the area.

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Description

Raheen in Ventry was the childhood home place of Peg Doyle (née Kavanagh). Her grandparents were Kate Hickson of Lispole and Daniel Kavanagh, and they had ten children. Peg’s mother Nora married Joseph Kavanagh, and they had seven children. Her brother, who inherited the farm, had seven children, so the house was always filled with life. Daniel Kavanagh and his brother Sean were bonesetters, and people came to the family home from all over the country for treatment at that time. Peg has a clear memory of the smell of seal oil permeating the house. This was used by her grandfather and granduncle in their treatment of patients. She recalls cooking over an open fire in the 1940s and 50s, barking the fishing nets, bringing the pigs to Tralee on a horse and creel, and other farming practices. Emigration when one reached the late teenage years was the norm, and Peg left for Springfield in the U.S., along with her siblings. She recalls in detail her experiences there and meeting her future husband, Stanley Doyle, who was a traditional musician who performed in bars across America. Her memories of travelling by train between cities in her adopted country are compared with travelling on the narrow-gauge railway line between Dingle and Tralee. She and her husband later returned to her family home in Ballinacourty in Annascaul, and she recounts many stories of the area.

Additional information

Type:

Disk, MP3

Audio series:

Tralee-Dingle Narrow Gauge Railway Collection

Bitrate:

128 kbps

Download time limit:

48 hours

File size(s):

69.99 MB, 61.1MB

Number of files:

1

Product ID:

CDTDR01-03

Subject:

A Way of Life

Recorded by:

Maurice O'Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore

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