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Sr. Philomena O’Daly (b. 1935)

6.9910.00

Description

Track 1: Sr. Philomena O’Daly explains that she was the child of her father’s third marriage, and that her mother died ten months after her birth. She was cared for in Inchicore, Dublin, by close family friends, the Hollands. Track 2: Excerpts are read from the testimony of her father to the Bureau of Military History, detailing his entry to the IRB in 1907 to join his two older brothers, Séamus and Frank O’Daly. Séamus O’Daly’s grandson, Tony Roche, also presents the background to Paddy O’Daly’s involvement in, and his injury during, the 1916 Rising. He points out that both Daisy and Brigid, the first and second wives of Paddy O’Daly, had been in Cumann na mBan, and were out in 1916 with his grandmother Nora. Track 3: The injury inflicted on Paddy O’Daly during the Rising is discussed by Sr. Philomena, as is his involvement in the later escape from Mountjoy Jail. She also describes Paddy’s meeting with his son, Paddy, following his release from Frongoch Camp in December 1916, and she recalls the sadnesses her brother Paddy endured during his lifetime and the effects of the Civil War on the family. Track 4: Sr. Philomena O’Daly recalls visitors to the family home during her childhood, including people such as Joe Leonard (one of Collins’s Twelve Apostles/the Squad), Joe McGuinness and Richard Mulcahy (Minister for Defence in the Free State Government). The dislike of Éamon de Valera felt by the O’Daly family, the reasons for this, and their great support of Michael Collins, are recalled. Paddy O’Daly’s work as a carpenter in the Board of Works and the attendance at his funeral in 1957 are also recalled. Track 5: Sr. Philomena discusses her father’s involvement in events in Ballyseedy, Tralee, during the Civil War. Tony Roche states that no order was given by Minister for Defence, Richard Mulcahy, at that time. The effects of this event in Kerry on the wider O’Daly family are discussed. Track 6: A discussion follows regarding an RTÉ documentary on Ballyseedy, first shown in 1997. Track 7: The great pain felt by Paddy O’Daly Junior towards the end of his life is described. Track 8: Paddy O’Daly’s involvement in the Irish Army during the Emergency (1939-1945) is discussed. Track 9: Sr. Philomena recalls her decision to enter the Little Sisters of the Assumption at the age of 22, and her regret at having to lose contact with her family and friends.

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Description

Track 1: Sr. Philomena O’Daly explains that she was the child of her father’s third marriage, and that her mother died ten months after her birth. She was cared for in Inchicore, Dublin, by close family friends, the Hollands. Track 2: Excerpts are read from the testimony of her father to the Bureau of Military History, detailing his entry to the IRB in 1907 to join his two older brothers, Séamus and Frank O’Daly. Séamus O’Daly’s grandson, Tony Roche, also presents the background to Paddy O’Daly’s involvement in, and his injury during, the 1916 Rising. He points out that both Daisy and Brigid, the first and second wives of Paddy O’Daly, had been in Cumann na mBan, and were out in 1916 with his grandmother Nora. Track 3: The injury inflicted on Paddy O’Daly during the Rising is discussed by Sr. Philomena, as is his involvement in the later escape from Mountjoy Jail. She also describes Paddy’s meeting with his son, Paddy, following his release from Frongoch Camp in December 1916, and she recalls the sadnesses her brother Paddy endured during his lifetime and the effects of the Civil War on the family. Track 4: Sr. Philomena O’Daly recalls visitors to the family home during her childhood, including people such as Joe Leonard (one of Collins’s Twelve Apostles/the Squad), Joe McGuinness and Richard Mulcahy (Minister for Defence in the Free State Government). The dislike of Éamon de Valera felt by the O’Daly family, the reasons for this, and their great support of Michael Collins, are recalled. Paddy O’Daly’s work as a carpenter in the Board of Works and the attendance at his funeral in 1957 are also recalled. Track 5: Sr. Philomena discusses her father’s involvement in events in Ballyseedy, Tralee, during the Civil War. Tony Roche states that no order was given by Minister for Defence, Richard Mulcahy, at that time. The effects of this event in Kerry on the wider O’Daly family are discussed. Track 6: A discussion follows regarding an RTÉ documentary on Ballyseedy, first shown in 1997. Track 7: The great pain felt by Paddy O’Daly Junior towards the end of his life is described. Track 8: Paddy O’Daly’s involvement in the Irish Army during the Emergency (1939-1945) is discussed. Track 9: Sr. Philomena recalls her decision to enter the Little Sisters of the Assumption at the age of 22, and her regret at having to lose contact with her family and friends.

Additional information

Type:

Disk, MP3

Audio series:

The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections

Bitrate:

128 kbps

Download time limit:

48 hours

File size(s):

4.16 MB, 7.72 MB, 10.39 MB, 6.71 MB, 10.12 MB, 4.13 MB, 6.48 MB
3.61 MB
6.34 MB

Number of files:

2

Product ID:

CD191601-086

Subject:

O’Daly, Paddy (Interviewee’s father)

Recorded by:

Seán MacRéamoinn

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