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Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth (b. 1950), Part 1

6.9910.00

Description

Track 1: Details of the 400 years of life at Lissadell, as lived by the Gore-Booth family, are set out. Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth’s first visit to Lissadell House in Co. Sligo, at the age of 17, is described. Track 2: Sir Josslyn describes his first meeting with his father at Lissadell. He also reflects on being Anglo-Irish and what this means to him. Track 3: Sir Josslyn’s grandfather, who was similarly named, is described. He was a reforming landlord who felt a strong obligation to his tenants. Track 4: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth provides his views on Constance Gore-Booth’s republican beliefs and revolutionary ideals. Her sister Eva’s involvement in the suffragette movement in England, and its effects on the family, are mentioned. Track 5: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth speaks about the arrest of Countess Markievicz following the surrender in 1916, and her correspondence of that time, which he later discovered at Lissadell. Track 6: Sir Josslyn’s views on the Countess’s involvement in the Rising are explained, together with the effect of this involvement on him personally. (Countess Markievicz was second in command to Michael Mallin at St. Stephen’s Green and in the College of Surgeons. She was initially sentenced to death.) Track 7: The Gore-Booth papers connected to the Countess, and Sir Josslyn’s deposit of those with the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland in Belfast are discussed. A set of handcuffs, probably given to the Countess following one of her arrests and retained by Sir Josslyn, are also mentioned. The reasons why the Countess chose not to return to Lissadell House during her lifetime are also explored.

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Description

Track 1: Details of the 400 years of life at Lissadell, as lived by the Gore-Booth family, are set out. Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth’s first visit to Lissadell House in Co. Sligo, at the age of 17, is described. Track 2: Sir Josslyn describes his first meeting with his father at Lissadell. He also reflects on being Anglo-Irish and what this means to him. Track 3: Sir Josslyn’s grandfather, who was similarly named, is described. He was a reforming landlord who felt a strong obligation to his tenants. Track 4: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth provides his views on Constance Gore-Booth’s republican beliefs and revolutionary ideals. Her sister Eva’s involvement in the suffragette movement in England, and its effects on the family, are mentioned. Track 5: Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth speaks about the arrest of Countess Markievicz following the surrender in 1916, and her correspondence of that time, which he later discovered at Lissadell. Track 6: Sir Josslyn’s views on the Countess’s involvement in the Rising are explained, together with the effect of this involvement on him personally. (Countess Markievicz was second in command to Michael Mallin at St. Stephen’s Green and in the College of Surgeons. She was initially sentenced to death.) Track 7: The Gore-Booth papers connected to the Countess, and Sir Josslyn’s deposit of those with the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland in Belfast are discussed. A set of handcuffs, probably given to the Countess following one of her arrests and retained by Sir Josslyn, are also mentioned. The reasons why the Countess chose not to return to Lissadell House during her lifetime are also explored.

Additional information

Type:

Disk, MP3

Audio series:

The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections

Bitrate:

128 kbps

Download time limit:

48 hours

File size(s):

6.61 MB, 8.66 MB, 5.01 MB, 6.88 MB, 4.38 MB, 4.18 MB, 4.73 MB

Number of files:

3

Product ID:

CD191601-039

Subject:

Gore-Booth, Constance – Countess Markievicz (Interviewee’s great-aunt)

Recorded by:

Unknown

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